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By Gail Forman | January 27, 1991
If your love life seems dull or your eyesight is failing, eat fennel. It's good for what ails you, according to legends associated with this plant, which was used as a medicine in ancient times and first mentioned in a papyrus historians date to 1500 B.C.The ancient Greeks enjoyed fennel, Charlemagne planted it in his domains, the great chef Taillevant served it to his employer, Charles VI, and it continues today to play an important role in the cuisines of...
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By Kit Waskom Pollard | October 2, 2014
At Lib's Grill in Perry Hall, Chef Daniel Chaustit welcomes the summer months with bright colors and the fresh flavors of seasonal fruits. This salad celebrates a variety of flavors and textures, combining crunchy fennel, meaty pistachios, tangy goat cheese, sweet strawberries and earthy beets. On the plate, the riot of color “screams summer,” says Lib's Grill manager Nick Liberatore. Great flavors, fun colors and wild textures? That's definitely something to shout about. Roasted Beets and Goat Cheese with Pomegranate Molasses & Fennel Salt Serves 4 2 pounds assorted beets 2 tablespoons neutral oil, such as vegetable oil Salt to taste ¼ cup toasted pistachios 1 tablespoon roasted fennel seeds ¼ cup strawberries, hulled 1 cup baby arugula 1 bulb baby fennel ¼ cup sherry vinegar ¿ cup kosher salt ¼ cup goat cheese Pomegranate molasses (available at most Middle Eastern or Asian markets)
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By JOE GRAY and JOE GRAY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 17, 2006
My Italian-born mother instilled in me a love for many foods of her homeland, especially the fresh fruit and vegetables hard to find here in the States when I was growing up in the '60s and '70s. Chief among them was fennel. The crisp, slightly sweet, gently licorice-flavored vegetable was a favorite snack eaten raw. Nowadays I use it most often in cooking. Its aromatic properties and mellowed flavor when cooked are the basis of this dish. Added are other fragrant vegetables - leeks and onions - and white beans and chicken sausage for heft.
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By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
I'm tired of planting tulip bulbs for voles to eat. What bulbs won't they eat? Squirrels, voles and chipmunks can all be the bane of bulb gardeners, but there are lots of rodent-proof choices - including daffodils, which now come in shades from pink to white with orange highlights, as well as many fascinating forms and fragrances. Other options include hyacinths (Hyacinthus orientalis), grape hyacinth (Muscari spp.), ornamental alliums, snowdrop (Galanthus spp.), summer snowflake (Leucojum spp.)
NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | December 27, 2006
Sausage, fennel, onion and tomatoes make a robust pasta topping. I adapted the recipe here from Tom Colicchio, award-winning chef of Craft and Gramercy Tavern in New York and judge on Bravo's Top Chef. Italian turkey sausage often is seasoned with fennel seed. Also called sweet anise, fennel is a large white bulb with celerylike stems and feathery green leaves. It has a mild licorice flavor and can be eaten raw or cooked. Wine suggestion --A perfect match for this fennel-scented dish is a big rich red that has a hint of licorice itself - syrah.
NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 22, 2004
Fennel is one of those overlooked vegetables. It's time to bring it out of its hiding place. This main dish pairs the mild, licorice-flavored plant with equally mild fish steaks and the salty deliciousness of parmesan cheese. Altogether, they create an elegant but quick meal. Then add a simple cherry-tomato salad, some bread and, for dessert, ice cream with a favorite topping from a jar. Butterscotch is my favorite. Tips Choose any mild fish, steaks or fillets, including halibut, snapper, trout or whitefish.
NEWS
By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,Chicago Tribune | March 26, 2008
The bulb and seeds of fennel are well-known in Mediterranean cooking, but you may not know that they generally are harvested from different varieties. Foeniculum dulce, also know as Florence fennel, produces the largest bulbs. F. vulgare, also known as common fennel, is generally grown for the seeds - used to flavor sausage or baked goods, among other foods - according to A Cook's Guide to Growing Herbs, Greens, & Aromatics, by Millie Owen. Mostly white but tinged with green, the bulbs have tightly overlapping layers that can be tough and stringy on the outside, but tender closer to the core.
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By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | August 2, 1998
Mesquite, maple, hickory - the aromatic woods that give barbecued meats their robust character - can overpower fish. A more subtle method of flavoring the fire for grilled fish pairs it with fennel.Bulb fennel does double duty at a fish grill: Tossed onto the coals, the trimmings - the tough outer ribs and feathery-tipped stalks - release flavorful smoke into the fish while the edible bulb grills alongside it. Fennel's crunchy texture softens and its anise flavor mellows as it cooks.Grilling times for both fennel and fish depend on the size and thickness of the portions and the heat of the coals.
NEWS
By JOE AND TERESSA GRAEDON | November 17, 2008
In India, we offer fennel seeds after meals. This helps avoid flatulence. Fennel is also good for sore throat and sinus problems. I use the following recipe for my sinus trouble: Combine 1 tablespoon fennel seeds, 1/4 teaspoon powdered ginger, 1 clove, 1/2 -inch piece of stick cinnamon and 1 teaspoon brown sugar in 2 cups of water. Boil it until there is 1 1/2 cups of liquid left, strain it and drink it hot with a little milk. You can substitute honey for the brown sugar. In India, we use many such home remedies from our grandmothers to avoid overusing antibiotics.
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By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2001
Fennel sounds funny, looks funny and tastes a bit like an old-fashioned candy, but its unmistakable, somewhat licorice-like flavor and crisp texture are seriously pleasing in lots of dishes. It looks, as writer Tamar Haspel comments, "like celery that swallowed a baseball." But it's all edible, from the bulb (as a vegetable, often sauteed, steamed or baked) to the leaves (as an herb, for flavoring soups and broth) to the seeds (as a spice, lending a piquant note to salads, dressings and sausage, among other things)
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
Chris Fennell has made every start this season for Navy, but the freshman defenseman's 11th start is in question. Fennell injured his right leg in the second half of the team's 7-6 double-overtime loss to No. 1 and Patriot League foe Loyola on Saturday and was sidelined for the remainder of the game. Coach Rick Sowell said it's too early to determine whether Fennell - who ranks second on the Midshipmen (4-6 overall and 3-4 in the conference) in caused turnovers with 13 and has collected 17 ground balls - can play at No. 13 Army (7-3, 5-1)
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By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2014
I ordered some trees from North Carolina and the nursery wanted to send them in February. What is a good time to have them delivered? You can't put the trees into the ground until the soil is workable, meaning it's dry enough so a clump crumbles in your hand when squeezed. That time varies from year to year depending on weather. April is a good bet. Sandy soils are ready earlier than clay soils. If the soil is unworkable when your plants arrive, keep them outside in a cool, shady area.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2011
Fall arrived a little early at the Dogwood. Galen Sampson's autumn menu is up and running. Here's what's making me hungry right now: A starter of radishes served open-face on a baguette with herbs, butter and red sea salt; Simmer Rock Farms beets and honeycrisp apples with honey-lime vinaigrette with toasted fennel seeds; escargot in roasted baby pumpkin with fennel and leeks; North Carolina rainbow trout with four-grain pilaf and a side...
NEWS
January 13, 2009
On January 3, 2009, CLEMMIE T.; devoted husband of Valerie L. Fennell. He is also survived by four children, four grandchildren and a host of other relatives and friends. Friends may visit the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME EAST, 1101 E. North Avenue on Tuesday after 8 A.M where the family will receive friends on Wednesday at 11:30 A.M. Funeral services will follow at 12 noon.
NEWS
By JOE AND TERESSA GRAEDON | November 17, 2008
In India, we offer fennel seeds after meals. This helps avoid flatulence. Fennel is also good for sore throat and sinus problems. I use the following recipe for my sinus trouble: Combine 1 tablespoon fennel seeds, 1/4 teaspoon powdered ginger, 1 clove, 1/2 -inch piece of stick cinnamon and 1 teaspoon brown sugar in 2 cups of water. Boil it until there is 1 1/2 cups of liquid left, strain it and drink it hot with a little milk. You can substitute honey for the brown sugar. In India, we use many such home remedies from our grandmothers to avoid overusing antibiotics.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | November 5, 2008
In the fall, when the magical landscapes of New England prove irresistible, our house turns into a bed and breakfast. A friend and her teenage grandson are traveling through our area to look at colleges, so we asked them to come for appetizers. The next day, a couple who live in Paris will stop by as they make their way through the Northeast on a leaf-peeping tour. Oh, and just to keep the phrase "the more the merrier" relative for us, our 6-year-old granddaughter and 3-year-old grandson will be coming out from Boston for an overnight stay while their parents attend a wedding close by. You get the idea!
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By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | March 11, 1992
Fragrant fennel is often said, unfairly, to taste like licorice. In fact the taste is light and delicate, elusive rather than persistent, and a perfect complement to salads, soups and stews.Fennel is closely associated with Italian cuisine and, according to Elizabeth Schneider's "Uncommon Fruits & Vegetables, A Commonsense Guide," ancient Romans used fennel to season pork, lamb, seafood and beans. Modern Italians still make a fennel and pork sausage. Fennel is available from early fall through late spring.
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By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | April 12, 2008
A few weekends ago, a good friend and I, along with our husbands, hosted a dinner party for eight. I love "co-entertaining" like this because it means that all the planning, the grocery shopping, the cooking and even the frenzied last-minute worrying are shared. For our gathering, my pal and I first chose a menu. It would begin with store-bought blinis garnished with smoked salmon and dollops of creme fraiche. For the main course there would be roasted Cornish hens served atop roasted fennel and fingerling potatoes.
NEWS
By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,Chicago Tribune | March 26, 2008
The bulb and seeds of fennel are well-known in Mediterranean cooking, but you may not know that they generally are harvested from different varieties. Foeniculum dulce, also know as Florence fennel, produces the largest bulbs. F. vulgare, also known as common fennel, is generally grown for the seeds - used to flavor sausage or baked goods, among other foods - according to A Cook's Guide to Growing Herbs, Greens, & Aromatics, by Millie Owen. Mostly white but tinged with green, the bulbs have tightly overlapping layers that can be tough and stringy on the outside, but tender closer to the core.
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