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By Knight-Ridder News Service | May 12, 1991
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- Feng shui is the Chinese geomantic art of arranging your surroundings -- your home, your business -- in a way that is balanced and harmonious.According to this belief, everything in the universe has its own essential spirit, energy or chi'i, and when feng shui is practiced correctly at home, say, our lives and destinies will improve and flow naturally and at ease with the cosmos.Feng shui literally means "wind and water" -- calm wind and still water.In her book "Interior Design With Feng Shui" (E. P. Dutton, 1987)
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By McClatchy-Tribune | June 24, 2007
SHENZHEN, China -- The life of an official in China's closed political system can be anxious and uncertain. Anyone who doubts that should stride up the initial flight of nine steps leading into the courthouse in Shenzhen. The courthouse used to have 11 steps. Two were removed. Workers also broadened the stairway and placed two fierce ceremonial stone lions at another entrance. The reasons for the redesign haven't been made public. But news reports suggest that agitated officials wanted to halt a run of bad luck, including the jailing of three judges for corruption.
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By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 15, 1998
"Mild wind, warm sun, clear water, lush vegetation" -- essential ingredients for a site with good feng shui-- Professor Lin YunThe desire of every gardener is to create a beautiful outdoor space and view from every window. But, how would you like to be able to use design in your garden to improve your health, wealth and love life, too? With feng shui, practitioners say you can.Feng shui is a system of landscape evaluation, building and object placement designed to put us in harmony with the earth and our surroundings -- surely a subject ever more on our minds as the millennium approaches.
NEWS
By STEPHANIE SHAPIRO and STEPHANIE SHAPIRO,SUN REPORTER | November 6, 2005
By classical standards, Homewood House, completed early in the 19th century on what became the Johns Hopkins University campus, is a masterpiece. If you apply the ancient principles of feng shui to its interior, it is also a beautiful home, but one that, facing south and southeast, admits an excess of "fire energy." For Homewood's ill-fated builder, Charles Carroll Jr., who spent profligately on his house and struggled with alcoholism, that energy may have been too much of a good thing.
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By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | July 6, 1997
Curative objects for the houseThe interest in feng shui, the almost mystical Chinese art of interior design, is growing faster than sources for the "cures" (as feng shui decorative accessories are known). Now Boomerang Words & Gifts (Padonia Village, 410-666-4410) has started carrying some of the most important ones.These include wood flutes, wall hangings, crystals, ba-qua mirrors (octagonal in shape), wind chimes -- even fresh flowers. (Artificial and dried just don't work with feng shui's principles of design.
FEATURES
May 12, 1996
With the millennium will come a greater spirituality in home design, according to a trend analyst at the recent New York Home Textiles Show.Elissa Moses, managing director of a trends think tank, the BrainWaves Group, predicts that feng shui will go mainstream, with consultants at Bloomingdale's to help us select our wind chimes and fish tanks. (Feng shui is the ancient Chinese art of design to achieve harmony and happiness.) Color analysis will expand from makeup and wardrobe to our homes for mood control.
BUSINESS
By Denise Haddix-Niemiec and Denise Haddix-Niemiec,Los Angeles Daily News | December 9, 1990
Real estate agent Angela Wong showed a suburban Los Angeles home to prospective buyers from Taiwan last month, but after one quick look, the deal was off.The drawbacks, as Ms. Wong explained it, were in the lot's triangular shape and the home's exposed ceilings. And it was more than just a matter of taste. The couple adheres to the tradition of "feng shui" and triangular shapes and exposed ceilings signify bad luck.The couple consulted a wise man who looked at the house, its location and even the direction of the wind before rendering their verdict.
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By Karin Remesch | November 29, 1998
Mission: To serve as a bridge between the cultures of East and West, encourage an understanding between these cultures, and provide programs for the state's growing Asian-American community to help preserve its cultural heritage and pride in tradition. The center highlights Asian arts and culture through its permanent collection, exhibitions, performances and educational programs. Started in 1971 when Frank Roberts donated a collection of Chinese and Japanese ivory carvings to the university, the center is the only campus-based organization for the presentation and preservation of Asian arts in Maryland.
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By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | October 20, 1996
It took a certain amount of daring for Susan Daniel to close down Tabrizi's, her successful Mediterranean restaurant in Federal Hill, and in its stead open Daniel's, an upscale but quirky seafood restaurant.Certainly Baltimore can use more restaurants dedicated to good seafood. And Daniel's offers good seafood. The question is whether it makes good business sense in this neighborhood to replace the mid-priced Tabrizi's with a restaurant where entrees average $20.Very little of the original Tabrizi's remains except for the open kitchen at the entrance.
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By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | July 26, 1998
Lawrence Weisgal had never really thought much about wind chimes until his sister sent him one as a gift. He was so intrigued by its melodic sounds and the decorative look of its dangling metal pieces he decided to make his own."The next thing I knew I had 74 of them all over the house," the Hampden resident says. "I couldn't even walk around."Such is the lure of wind chimes, those (usually) small mobiles that ring with a gentle tinkling sound when a breeze stirs them. Weisgal now makes wind chimes, often out of silverware, for a living.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2005
Baby, you're hot. So hot that we're getting more interested in buying stuff for you before you're born than when you're here. So lucrative that struggling Toys "R" Us will soon convert two of its Manhattan stores to Babies "R" Us, with blankets, bouncers and bottles more geared to the still-spitting-up. So intriguing that we are now applying feng shui principles to nursery design and trying to figure you out with astrology. At the same time, we are trying to make you more like us. Your bedding and borders are no longer so cutesy, not just pink or blue.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 13, 2003
How we sell real estate is determined by cultural influences. For more than 50 years, the market assumed that the typical new-home buyers would be the Cleavers: people of European ancestry; a mother, a father and two children who saw themselves pretty much as Madison Avenue saw them. And, accordingly, builders and real estate agents came up with ways to deal with these "traditional" buyers that served them well for decades. The culture of the marketplace has changed, however, with the entry of millions of immigrants from Asia and Latin America, as well as an increase in black buyers during the past dozen years.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | February 4, 2001
Thousands of years ago, the Chinese invented the philosophy of Feng Shui to figure out furniture arrangements at home that would give them positive energy flow and harmony in their lives. Today, Feng Shui is enjoying increasing popularity in America -- but not just as a decorating tool. In the grand American tradition of repackaging an age-old practice for marketing to the masses, image consultants have begun using the ancient philosophy to determine what clothes a person should wear to bring them luck and happiness.
FEATURES
By Karin Remesch | November 29, 1998
Mission: To serve as a bridge between the cultures of East and West, encourage an understanding between these cultures, and provide programs for the state's growing Asian-American community to help preserve its cultural heritage and pride in tradition. The center highlights Asian arts and culture through its permanent collection, exhibitions, performances and educational programs. Started in 1971 when Frank Roberts donated a collection of Chinese and Japanese ivory carvings to the university, the center is the only campus-based organization for the presentation and preservation of Asian arts in Maryland.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | July 26, 1998
Lawrence Weisgal had never really thought much about wind chimes until his sister sent him one as a gift. He was so intrigued by its melodic sounds and the decorative look of its dangling metal pieces he decided to make his own."The next thing I knew I had 74 of them all over the house," the Hampden resident says. "I couldn't even walk around."Such is the lure of wind chimes, those (usually) small mobiles that ring with a gentle tinkling sound when a breeze stirs them. Weisgal now makes wind chimes, often out of silverware, for a living.
FEATURES
By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 15, 1998
"Mild wind, warm sun, clear water, lush vegetation" -- essential ingredients for a site with good feng shui-- Professor Lin YunThe desire of every gardener is to create a beautiful outdoor space and view from every window. But, how would you like to be able to use design in your garden to improve your health, wealth and love life, too? With feng shui, practitioners say you can.Feng shui is a system of landscape evaluation, building and object placement designed to put us in harmony with the earth and our surroundings -- surely a subject ever more on our minds as the millennium approaches.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | February 5, 1995
Greenspring Inn, 10801 Falls Road, Lutherville, (410) 823-1125. Open every day for lunch and dinner. AE, MC, V. No-smoking area: yes. Prices: appetizers, $3.25-$9; entrees, $7.95-$21. ***Chinese restaurants have always seemed willing to modify their cuisine to suit American tastes.I don't notice it so much in other Asian eating places. Japanese restaurants have gotten their American diners to eat raw fish and seaweed -- and not only eat them but like them. I'm not sure why the Chinese can't wean their customers from fried foods and thick sauces.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | November 12, 1995
The mainstream interest in feng shui just keeps growing. More and more people are applying feng shui (pronounced FUNG shway), the ancient Chinese art of placement to achieve harmony and balance, to the interior design of their homes.Check out the selection of paperback books on the subject at Borders (the first two are new this fall): "The Feng Shui Kit" ($29.95), "Feng Shui Made Easy" ($15), "The Elements of Feng Shui" ($9.95), "Interior Design with Feng Shui" ($15.95) and "Living Color" ($18)
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | July 6, 1997
Curative objects for the houseThe interest in feng shui, the almost mystical Chinese art of interior design, is growing faster than sources for the "cures" (as feng shui decorative accessories are known). Now Boomerang Words & Gifts (Padonia Village, 410-666-4410) has started carrying some of the most important ones.These include wood flutes, wall hangings, crystals, ba-qua mirrors (octagonal in shape), wind chimes -- even fresh flowers. (Artificial and dried just don't work with feng shui's principles of design.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | October 20, 1996
It took a certain amount of daring for Susan Daniel to close down Tabrizi's, her successful Mediterranean restaurant in Federal Hill, and in its stead open Daniel's, an upscale but quirky seafood restaurant.Certainly Baltimore can use more restaurants dedicated to good seafood. And Daniel's offers good seafood. The question is whether it makes good business sense in this neighborhood to replace the mid-priced Tabrizi's with a restaurant where entrees average $20.Very little of the original Tabrizi's remains except for the open kitchen at the entrance.
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