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By Michael Sragow and By Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 10, 2002
In thrillers from Carrie (1976) and Dressed to Kill (1980) to Snake Eyes (1998) and Femme Fatale, which opened in Baltimore Wednesday, director Brian De Palma has taken Carl Jung's definition of movies as his credo. "The cinema," Jung wrote, "makes it possible to experience without danger all the excitement, passion and desirousness which must be repressed in a humanitarian ordering of life." In Femme Fatale, De Palma reaches new peaks of "excitement, passion and desirousness." And he does so while analyzing the femme fatale -- the woman who seduces and kills -- with all the relish of Jung taking apart a favorite archetype.
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By Los Angeles Times | February 28, 2009
Series Color Splash: : A living room is transformed in the Hollywood Regency style. (9 p.m., HGTV) Storytellers:: Kanye West is profiled. (9 p.m., VH1) 48 Hours Mystery: : A family with four children set out to sail around the world and met with catastrophe. (10 p.m., WJZ-Channel 13) Rissi Palmer's Country: : The country singer explores the streets of Chicago and visits blues joints like Rosa's Lounge and Buddy Guy's Legends in the new travel series. (10 p.m., Travel) Movies Cast Away: : Tom Hanks reteamed with director Robert Zemeckis for this 2000 drama about a man stranded by a plane crash on an island for four years.
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NEWS
November 25, 1993
* Dorothy Revier, 89, known as "The Queen of Poverty Row" for her work in a string of low-budget silent films and early talkies, died Nov. 19 at Queen of Angels-Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center in Los Angeles, Richard Lamparski, a film historian, said. She was born Doris Velegra in San Francisco. She was mostly cast as a femme fatale, including the villainous Milady DeWinter opposite Douglas Fairbanks in "The Iron Mask" in 1929. She was dubbed "The Queen of Poverty Row" for her work with Columbia Pictures, then a low-budget studio.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Swift | November 2, 2008
FILM 'I.O.U.S.A.': Talk about good timing. This documentary about the dangers of bad debt couldn't be more relevant amid a global financial meltdown. Inspired by the work of Baltimore-based publisher Agora Financial, the film made a splash at this summer's Maryland Film Festival and is now getting a well-deserved theatrical release. In theaters Friday. TV 'The Simpsons': : After 20 seasons, The Simpsons is hardly must-see-TV anymore. But there is one exception every year: "The Treehouse of Horror."
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 6, 2002
If you liked Mulholland Drive, you'll love Femme Fatale: It's the most uninhibited piece of moviemaking to open in Baltimore since Y Tu Mama Tambien. Brian De Palma, the director of Carrie and Dressed to Kill and those under-attended masterpieces, Blow Out and Casualties of War, hasn't lost the bad-boy glint in his lens. This darkly funny story about a cold-blooded, Paris-based con woman named Laure Ash (Rebecca Romijn-Stamos) and the most charming dupe in the world, a photographer named Nicolas Bardo (Antonio Banderas)
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 28, 2009
Series Color Splash: : A living room is transformed in the Hollywood Regency style. (9 p.m., HGTV) Storytellers:: Kanye West is profiled. (9 p.m., VH1) 48 Hours Mystery: : A family with four children set out to sail around the world and met with catastrophe. (10 p.m., WJZ-Channel 13) Rissi Palmer's Country: : The country singer explores the streets of Chicago and visits blues joints like Rosa's Lounge and Buddy Guy's Legends in the new travel series. (10 p.m., Travel) Movies Cast Away: : Tom Hanks reteamed with director Robert Zemeckis for this 2000 drama about a man stranded by a plane crash on an island for four years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Josh Mooney | November 15, 1991
GUILTY BY SUSPICIONWarner Home Video$92.99Producer Irwin Winkler here turns to what is obviously a story near and dear to his heart -- the Hollywood Communist witch hunts in the '40s and '50s. His passions, though, don't guarantee a winner, and "Guilty By Suspicion" ends up being an earnest, by-the-numbers telling of a fairly familiar story.Fortunately, this hero is played by Robert De Niro, so strong acting is assured. He plays David Merrill, a director in Hollywood during the years that the House Un-American Activities Committee engaged in their digging to find "Communists" and their ilk.Called to testify, Merrill faces the ultimate nightmarish dilemma: If he names his friends who are left-leaning, the committee will go easy on him. Merrill struggles throughout the film to find the courage to do the right thing, while the film struggles to keep us interested.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 19, 2007
SWEET LAND [Fox] $28 Sometimes movie gems come out of left field. Case in point is this independently made romantic drama by Minnesota-based, first-time feature writer-director Ali Selim. The critically acclaimed tale revolves around a German-born mail-order bride (Elizabeth Reaser) who arrives in rural Minnesota in the 1920s to marry a taciturn Norwegian immigrant farmer (Tim Guinee). Alan Cumming, who was also a producer, Lois Smith and Paul Sand also star in the film, which was made for a mere $1 million.
FEATURES
October 30, 2004
One-eyed Mike Wazowski and James P. "Sulley" Sullivan are professional scarers, with the screams they generate powering Monsteropolis. They punch the clock, scare some humans, go home. It's a living. But, when a little human girl follows the (to her) teddy-bearish Sulley back to his world, and a co-worker's envy boils over, workplace turmoil ensues. Monsters, Inc. (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) features the voices of Billy Crystal and John Goodman. ABC. At a glance Brokedown Palace (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WUTB, Channel 24)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | May 6, 1994
Is there any older, creakier, deader movie bit than . . . amnesia? Really, not even Carbon-14 dating methods could unearth the first time this ancient stroke was employed by a desperate storyteller. Surely it was sometime in the Jurassic.Now here's "Clean Slate," which builds a whole movie around amnesia. Talk about despair! It's a festival of strained, grasping, sweaty almost-gags and near-jokes.Dana Carvey, as wan a screen presence as he is dynamic a tube presence, plays a Los Angeles private detective named Maurice Pogue who has received a brain injury in the middle of a case.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 19, 2007
SWEET LAND [Fox] $28 Sometimes movie gems come out of left field. Case in point is this independently made romantic drama by Minnesota-based, first-time feature writer-director Ali Selim. The critically acclaimed tale revolves around a German-born mail-order bride (Elizabeth Reaser) who arrives in rural Minnesota in the 1920s to marry a taciturn Norwegian immigrant farmer (Tim Guinee). Alan Cumming, who was also a producer, Lois Smith and Paul Sand also star in the film, which was made for a mere $1 million.
FEATURES
October 30, 2004
One-eyed Mike Wazowski and James P. "Sulley" Sullivan are professional scarers, with the screams they generate powering Monsteropolis. They punch the clock, scare some humans, go home. It's a living. But, when a little human girl follows the (to her) teddy-bearish Sulley back to his world, and a co-worker's envy boils over, workplace turmoil ensues. Monsters, Inc. (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) features the voices of Billy Crystal and John Goodman. ABC. At a glance Brokedown Palace (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WUTB, Channel 24)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 5, 2003
PBS begins a summer season of its celebrated Mystery! series tomorrow night, and the best way to describe its theme might be: When it comes to murder, there is nothing like a dame. Dame Diana Rigg not only serves as host of the series, but returns July 13 in The Mrs. Bradley Mysteries as Adela Bradley, the ultra-chic psychologist-sleuth in the chauffeur-driven Rolls-Royce. Any lineup with Rigg in it is a winner, but she's not the only lady of high style who will be gracing the public airwaves this summer in Mystery!
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 25, 2003
Since MTV has just announced its intention to produce an update of Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights, it's a relief that you can see the classic William Wyler version this Sunday at 6 on Turner Classic Movies. (It's part of TCM's series The Essentials, with director-actor Sydney Pollack as host.) Wyler's peerless romance from 1939 doesn't need a contemporary angle to tug the audience immediately into a romantic, haunted vision of the Yorkshire moors. Its melancholy pull isn't a matter of special effects; until the end, the ghosts remain offscreen.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | January 5, 2003
It's hard to say what's most striking about Chicago showgirl Velma Kelly -- the bright red lips, the smoky eyes, the short dresses with sequined strands that seductively dust her behind, or the fact that she shot her husband with no regrets. The combination of elements, however, makes for a stirring, dangerous beauty that men want to touch and women want to possess. Velma (played by Catherine Zeta-Jones) and her Chicago showgirl-inmate counterparts are the latest permutations of femme fatales on the American big screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and By Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 10, 2002
In thrillers from Carrie (1976) and Dressed to Kill (1980) to Snake Eyes (1998) and Femme Fatale, which opened in Baltimore Wednesday, director Brian De Palma has taken Carl Jung's definition of movies as his credo. "The cinema," Jung wrote, "makes it possible to experience without danger all the excitement, passion and desirousness which must be repressed in a humanitarian ordering of life." In Femme Fatale, De Palma reaches new peaks of "excitement, passion and desirousness." And he does so while analyzing the femme fatale -- the woman who seduces and kills -- with all the relish of Jung taking apart a favorite archetype.
FEATURES
By Moira Macdonald and Moira Macdonald,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 10, 2002
Denzel Washington will be there. Michelle Pfeiffer will be there. So will Salma Hayek, Susan Sarandon, Colin Farrell, Julianne Moore, Robert Duvall, Heath Ledger and an international lineup of star directors (Pedro Almodovar, Todd Haynes, Mike Leigh, Hayao Miyazaki, Catherine Breillat, David Cronenberg, and Neil Jordan, to name just a few). The 27th annual Toronto International Film Festival, which opened Thursday and runs through Saturday on 20 screens in downtown Toronto, features 343 films from around the world.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 10, 2002
Enigma, named for the Nazi secret-coding machine, has everything going for it except a pulse. The real-life subject of the brilliant misfit Brits who broke the Nazis' codes couldn't be more compelling. The fictional story of a genius mathematician (Dougray Scott) who carries the torch for a femme fatale (Saffron Burrows) also working at the code-breakers' headquarters, Bletchley Park, brings home the risky excitement of life during wartime. Kate Winslet emerges once again in all her fleshy, brainy glory as another toiler at Bletchley Park and the woman of mystery's roommate.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 6, 2002
If you liked Mulholland Drive, you'll love Femme Fatale: It's the most uninhibited piece of moviemaking to open in Baltimore since Y Tu Mama Tambien. Brian De Palma, the director of Carrie and Dressed to Kill and those under-attended masterpieces, Blow Out and Casualties of War, hasn't lost the bad-boy glint in his lens. This darkly funny story about a cold-blooded, Paris-based con woman named Laure Ash (Rebecca Romijn-Stamos) and the most charming dupe in the world, a photographer named Nicolas Bardo (Antonio Banderas)
FEATURES
By Moira Macdonald and Moira Macdonald,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 10, 2002
Denzel Washington will be there. Michelle Pfeiffer will be there. So will Salma Hayek, Susan Sarandon, Colin Farrell, Julianne Moore, Robert Duvall, Heath Ledger and an international lineup of star directors (Pedro Almodovar, Todd Haynes, Mike Leigh, Hayao Miyazaki, Catherine Breillat, David Cronenberg, and Neil Jordan, to name just a few). The 27th annual Toronto International Film Festival, which opened Thursday and runs through Saturday on 20 screens in downtown Toronto, features 343 films from around the world.
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