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Susan Reimer | June 5, 2013
I think Edith Bunker did more to liberate the caged American housewife than Betty Friedan ever did. The author of "The Feminine Mystique" is the one who identified the nameless dissatisfaction of women at home with the kids and the kitchen chores. But it was Archie Bunker's wife, Edith - so memorably portrayed by Jean Stapleton, who died last week at 90 - who brought it home, literally. "All in The Family" was the most popular show on network television for years in the 1970s - back in the days of appointment television, when families gathered together to watch their favorite shows.
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | September 29, 2014
Last Friday, the White House announced an "It's On Us" initiative aimed at combating sexual assaults on college campuses. I'm all in favor of combating sexual assault, but the first priority in combating a problem is understanding it. That's not the White House's first priority. Roughly six weeks before Election Day, its chief concern is to translate an exciting social media campaign into a get-out-the-vote operation. Accurate statistics are of limited use in that regard because rape and sexual assault have been declining for decades.
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NEWS
By Susan Jacoby | August 13, 2002
ANYONE WHO denigrates the feminist movement of the 1970s -- including young women who declare, "I'm no feminist" -- should take a look at a tape of an interview with two teen-age heroes who appeared together last week on the Today show. Tamara Brooks, 16, and Jacqueline Marris, 17, were abducted at gunpoint from a lover's lane in Lancaster, Calif., driven to a remote location, raped and held captive for 12 hours before sheriff's deputies shot and killed their kidnapper. The young women, who did not know each other before they were taken from separate cars, kept their wits and worked together, communicating by tracing letters in each other's palms, to distract the kidnapper.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2014
One artist began to paint after her mother was murdered by her brother when she was 14 years old. As an adult, she's obsessed with drawing circles, a infinite shape that begins but never ends. Another woman, also a painter, depicts barrier after barrier: wooden fences and chain-link fences, closed doors and shutters. But she also depicts the air pockets between those metal links and the holes in the slabs, rendering not just the impediments but a way through them. A third thinks of herself as a builder, someone who makes things.
NEWS
By SANDY CLOSE | October 15, 1991
San Francisco. - Women climb the steps of Capitol Hill with a heady stride these days -- but at what price? The empowerment feminist politicians promise comes at the cost of human relations as sterile and bloodless as those of the male power structure they once hoped to transform, not merely replace.2 Sandy Close is editor of Pacific News Service.
FEATURES
By ALICE STEINBACH | March 26, 1992
Before we venture too far into this column, it seems appropriate to say a few words about Hillary Clinton and the fallout from her recent "I could have stayed home and baked cookies" remark.So, here are a few words. I didn't say them, but they express my sentiments exactly:"I think it proves that even smart people can say dumb things," is the way political consultant Ann Lewis, in a recent television appearance, summed up the much overblown cookie flap.Of course, Hillary Clinton needs no one to defend her when it comes to supporting the causes of women and children.
FEATURES
By Henry Scarupa | March 10, 1991
You won't find radical feminist Robin Morgan cheering the troops in the Persian Gulf.Noting she would have preferred prolonged diplomacy to war, however swift and victorious for American forces, she said, "I don't support the people in the Middle East as troops, don't support them being killers and forced to do what they had to do."If that weren't enough in this time of fervent patriotism, this 5-foot woman with short, sculpted salt-and-pepper hair and soft, brown eyes fired away at Pentagon generals with smart weapons from her personal arsenal -- scathing wit and satire.
NEWS
By Newsday | October 9, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Prominent feminists reacted in triumph and conservatives in dismay to the Senate's one-week delay in voting on Judge Clarence Thomas' nomination to the Supreme Court."
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | February 10, 2008
Brace yourself. I'm going to use a word that offends folks. I'm talking the F-word. Feminist. This woman sent me an e-mail Monday and it got me thinking. See, in describing herself, she assured me she was not a "women's libber" - the late 1960s equivalent of feminist. She also said she was retired from the Navy. There was, it seemed to me, a disconnect there: She doesn't believe in women's liberation, yet she is retired from a position that liberation made possible. Intrigued, I asked my 17-year-old daughter if she considers herself a feminist.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2000
Chick flicks, chick literature, whiny chick music ... You can tell from the labels that society doesn't take female-focused entertainment all that seriously. But the real question is, how seriously are women portrayed in movies, books, songs and pop culture? To determine whether these female characters and vehicles are feminist, merely female-oriented or simply foul, we asked five feminist speakers from the Feminist Expo 2000, starting today at the Baltimore Convention Center, to sound off. They are: filmmaker, author and lecturer Jean Kilbourne; comedian Rene Hicks; Feminist Majority Foundation Board Chair Peg Yorkin; and Nicole Yorkin and Dawn Prestwich, co-executive producers of "Judging Amy."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
As the lead singer of the Baltimore feminist punk band War On Women, Shawna Potter occasionally encounters brash harassment from men in the crowds. Some might internalize or bury the anger that results from such sexism, but the 31-year-old has no problem addressing an agitator head-on, as she did in Los Angeles in February. Make comments about Potter's body, and prepare to be embarrassed. “When things like that happen, I'm still shocked,” Potter said last week from a love seat in Big Crunch, the Johnston Square instrument repair shop she manages.
NEWS
By Jill Hummer | December 16, 2013
Relieved by Michelle Obama's recent foray into higher education policy, Politico Magazine last month dubbed her soft focus first ladyship up to that point a "feminist nightmare. " On the surface, there may be something to this claim. For example, Mrs. Obama's Let's Move website currently features her gardening with school children and cooking with Elmo from Sesame Street. But feminists are wrong to say that Michelle Obama has not been active in policy. Just because her policy activism has more to do with children - and less to do with abortion rights and birth control access and paycheck fairness - does not mean she has been a retro throwback to the Mamie Eisenhower era. In fact, when I teach courses on public policy, I regularly use Michelle Obama as a case study to highlight important aspects of the policy making process.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | June 5, 2013
I think Edith Bunker did more to liberate the caged American housewife than Betty Friedan ever did. The author of "The Feminine Mystique" is the one who identified the nameless dissatisfaction of women at home with the kids and the kitchen chores. But it was Archie Bunker's wife, Edith - so memorably portrayed by Jean Stapleton, who died last week at 90 - who brought it home, literally. "All in The Family" was the most popular show on network television for years in the 1970s - back in the days of appointment television, when families gathered together to watch their favorite shows.
NEWS
By Matt Schudel, The Washington Post | March 28, 2012
Adrienne Rich, one of the country's most honored and influential poets, whose finely tuned verse explored her identity as a feminist, a lesbian and an agent for political change, died Tuesday at her home in Santa Cruz, Calif. She was 82. She died of complications from rheumatoid arthritis, said her son, Pablo Conrad. In more than 60 years as a published poet, Ms. Rich examined the evolving lives of women in modern society and embodied many of those changes herself. She was a precocious child of a privileged Baltimore family, then a young wife and mother, and later dedicated herself to the ideals of feminism.
NEWS
February 8, 2012
I'm beginning to wonder if there is a connection between the Super Bowl and heightened feminist frenzy. Last year, it was the Tebows' commercial celebrating life and the gift of children that had feminists all in a lather. This year it revolves around the Susan B. Komen Foundation's decision (and then the retraction of that decision) to stop funding Planned Parenthood. My wife and I are contributors to the Komen Foundation, and our decision to continue or discontinue contributing will depend on whether the foundation remains true to its mission.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | June 23, 2011
Maybe you've heard of the group Conscious Men, a new movement asking men to sign a document that "acknowledges many thousands of years of dominance of masculine power, and offers an apology for the suppression of women, in the spirit of a fresh start"? The group feels that "balance and equal respect for both energies will allow for a new wave of evolution on our planet. " They released a YouTube video called "Dear Woman" that has more than 650,000 views. Yesterday, the group picked up two high-profile actors to join its cause.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Sun staff writers Thomas W. Waldron and Liz Bowie contributed to this article | April 1, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Known for a fearsome and feisty style punctuated by a broad-brimmed hat, former New York congresswoman and feminist pioneer Bella Abzug died yesterday of complications after heart surgery. She was 77.Ms. Abzug, who died at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in Manhattan after having been hospitalized for three weeks, was often considered the mother of the women's political movement, and she championed liberal causes and civil rights throughout her life.Making conservatives shudder with her dovish ideals and gravelly, Bronx-laced voice -- a voice that Norman Mailer said "could boil the fat off a taxicab driver's neck"-- Ms. Abzug fought against the Vietnam War and the draft, and for the Equal Rights Amendment and federally funded child care while in Congress between 1971 and 1977.
NEWS
By ELAINE WOO and ELAINE WOO,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 5, 2006
Betty Friedan, the visionary, combative feminist who launched a social revolution with her provocative 1963 book, The Feminine Mystique, died yesterday, her 85th birthday. She died of congestive heart failure at her home in Washington, said Emily Bazelon, a cousin speaking for the family. She said Ms. Friedan had been in failing health for some time. Her best-selling book identified "the problem that has no name," the unhappiness of post-World War II American women unfulfilled by traditional notions of female domesticity.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2010
For its next-to-last show of the 2009-2010 season, Colonial Players is presenting Doris Baizley's "Mrs. California," which depicts a televised contest of 1950s homemaking skills. Although the play is a better choice than the previously scheduled "Kitchen Witches," it lacks the substance of CP's first five shows of the season. Baizley, who wrote the play in 1986, sets the action in 1955, a decade after millions of veterans had returned to their careers and their wives had left their wartime jobs for full-time home and family care duties.
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