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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 5, 2001
Bad taste has its standards, and as far as John Waters is concerned, they weren't being met for Female Trouble until he assembled the version of the film now being shown at the Senator Theatre and released in a two-pack DVD with Pink Flamingos, complete with full-length director's commentaries. Back in 1974, Maryland censor Mary Avara made him cut a shot of a nude girl's hips moving and tried to make him cut any shot where she thought that the "womanhood" of his star, Divine, was showing - never mind that Divine was a man. Right before the film was released, "a nameless executive" declared the movie too long and cut the scene of Divine swimming across a river in full drag, even though, in terms of a performer's daring, it was the cult-film equivalent of Lillian Gish floating among the ice floes in D.W. Griffith's Way Down East.
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By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mcCauley@baltsun.com | January 21, 2010
In John Waters' new gallery show, "Versailles," the cult filmmaker demonstrates his uncanny knack for having it both ways. Over the past half-century, Baltimore's favorite bad boy has carefully constructed an image as a provocateur. But he somehow manages to needle gently, without giving too much offense. "I travel in two completely different worlds," Waters says, "and I love them both. To me, there is no tension between the different realities. I find the contrast delightful." For instance, the title image in his new show, which runs through Feb. 27 at C. Grimaldis Gallery, is split in half.
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FEATURES
By Sun Staff | October 3, 2001
Female Trouble, the 1975 cult extravaganza from Baltimore's most notorious favorite-son filmmaker, John Waters, opens today at the Senator Theatre in a print that Waters promises is spiffier than ever and fuller than any available before, unless you bought six different video versions in various foreign countries and spliced them together. Female Trouble was Waters' follow-up to the outrageous 1972 film Pink Flamingos. The story is one of crime, beauty, and the depths of tragedy and comedy to which both can lead.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | March 6, 2007
If only she'd asked. There'll be no "Female Trouble" on the CD by Hustler magazine cover girl Candye Kane, after director-songwriter-sleaze raconteur John Waters denied her permission to include an update of the title song from his 1974 movie of the same name. Kane recorded the song last year. But Waters, who co-wrote the song with Bob Harvey, said he didn't know about it until he received her e-mail saying it was going to be on her CD. "She never asked ... permission," he said yesterday from his Baltimore home, "and you don't get permission by writing new lyrics and changing the whole thing."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | March 6, 2007
If only she'd asked. There'll be no "Female Trouble" on the CD by Hustler magazine cover girl Candye Kane, after director-songwriter-sleaze raconteur John Waters denied her permission to include an update of the title song from his 1974 movie of the same name. Kane recorded the song last year. But Waters, who co-wrote the song with Bob Harvey, said he didn't know about it until he received her e-mail saying it was going to be on her CD. "She never asked ... permission," he said yesterday from his Baltimore home, "and you don't get permission by writing new lyrics and changing the whole thing."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mcCauley@baltsun.com | January 21, 2010
In John Waters' new gallery show, "Versailles," the cult filmmaker demonstrates his uncanny knack for having it both ways. Over the past half-century, Baltimore's favorite bad boy has carefully constructed an image as a provocateur. But he somehow manages to needle gently, without giving too much offense. "I travel in two completely different worlds," Waters says, "and I love them both. To me, there is no tension between the different realities. I find the contrast delightful." For instance, the title image in his new show, which runs through Feb. 27 at C. Grimaldis Gallery, is split in half.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 20, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The federal government said yesterday that it plans to conduct the most sweeping study of women's health problems ever attempted, with hundreds of thousands of women participating in a research effort expected to cost $500 million over 10 years.The project is the brainchild of the new director of the National Institutes of Health, Dr. Bernadine Healy, who said that it would be "the most definitive, far-reaching study of women's health ever undertaken in the United States, if not the world."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Knight Ridder Newspapers | May 5, 2002
Female Trouble: Stories, by Antonya Nelson. Scribner. 249 pages. $24. Nearly all of Nelson's 13 stories are satisfying because she is able to limn from the banality of domestic comfort insistent little truths that linger like incense. First among these revelations is how women are just as capable as men of stirring up a perfectly comfortable life until it is subverted and forever changed. It is in "Palisades" that one finds Nelson at her most challenging. Here, a woman in comfortable circumstances feels compelled to topple the bourgeois good fortune of her predictable life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | October 21, 2001
My Son Divine, by Frances Milstead with Kevin Hefferman and Steve Yeager (Alyson Books, 256 pages, $18.95, paper). It would be both inhumane and inaccurate to say that that consummate Baltimore filmmaker, John Waters, invented the character Divine -- hugely prominent and entertaining star in Waters' Female Trouble, Pink Flamingos, Polyester and Hairspray. Until Waters took him up and named him, however, Divine was Harris Glenn Milstead, angelic choirboy and then somewhat effeminate and troubled teen-ager.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2012
If you're looking for a great new alter ego, try joining Charm City Roller Girls. That's what Silver Spring native Lily Bradford did after frequently attending their events. "I had been living in Baltimore for a few years, and felt disengaged from the city," she said. "I decided to put myself outside my comfort zone and challenge myself to learning a new skill set late in life. " The Bolton Hill resident rolls on two local teams - during the home-team season, she's with the Mobtown Mods fighting for the Donaghy Cup, and right now she's hitting the road with Female Trouble.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 5, 2001
Bad taste has its standards, and as far as John Waters is concerned, they weren't being met for Female Trouble until he assembled the version of the film now being shown at the Senator Theatre and released in a two-pack DVD with Pink Flamingos, complete with full-length director's commentaries. Back in 1974, Maryland censor Mary Avara made him cut a shot of a nude girl's hips moving and tried to make him cut any shot where she thought that the "womanhood" of his star, Divine, was showing - never mind that Divine was a man. Right before the film was released, "a nameless executive" declared the movie too long and cut the scene of Divine swimming across a river in full drag, even though, in terms of a performer's daring, it was the cult-film equivalent of Lillian Gish floating among the ice floes in D.W. Griffith's Way Down East.
FEATURES
By Sun Staff | October 3, 2001
Female Trouble, the 1975 cult extravaganza from Baltimore's most notorious favorite-son filmmaker, John Waters, opens today at the Senator Theatre in a print that Waters promises is spiffier than ever and fuller than any available before, unless you bought six different video versions in various foreign countries and spliced them together. Female Trouble was Waters' follow-up to the outrageous 1972 film Pink Flamingos. The story is one of crime, beauty, and the depths of tragedy and comedy to which both can lead.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 20, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The federal government said yesterday that it plans to conduct the most sweeping study of women's health problems ever attempted, with hundreds of thousands of women participating in a research effort expected to cost $500 million over 10 years.The project is the brainchild of the new director of the National Institutes of Health, Dr. Bernadine Healy, who said that it would be "the most definitive, far-reaching study of women's health ever undertaken in the United States, if not the world."
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee | November 28, 1999
When Mary Bo Quoit, the filly otherwise known as Miss Piggy and whose life is being chronicled in The Sun, finished the fourth race of her career yesterday at Laurel Park, her jockey, Mario Verge, was splattered with pasty dirt thrown up by the other horses who passed her."She was just upset and didn't want to run," said Verge, who had been encouraged by Mary Bo Quoit's performance a month ago, when she recovered from a bad stumble and raced to the finish."Today, she didn't try," Verge said.
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