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By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2011
Anne Arundel County's highway bureau will receive $1.5 million in federal aid to reimburse local taxpayers for money spent clearing snow from last February's snowstorms. The assistance from the Federal Emergency Management Agency represents 75 percent of the county's expenditures. It is part of more than $82 million that FEMA has provided for Maryland following federal disaster declarations during last year's severe winter weather. Maryland weather blog: Frank Roylance on meteorology Sign up for FREE mobile weather alerts
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NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski joined a bipartisan chorus of lawmakers Monday calling on the Obama administration to speed up the implementation of a law intended to mitigate increases in flood insurance premiums. In a letter to Craig Fugate, administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, Mikulski wrote that families on the Eastern Shore whose homes are located in the state's floodplain are facing "astronomical increases in their flood insurance premiums. " President Obama signed bipartisan legislation last month to stop those premium increases but several lawmakers have raised concerns that FEMA is not moving quickly enough to implement the law. "Without immediate implementation ... my constituents face enormous increases in their flood insurance premiums which could cause serious financial hardship and even the loss of their homes," the Maryland Democrat wrote.
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NEWS
December 7, 2005
The planned overhaul of the beleaguered Federal Emergency Management Agency is a welcome move, and not just because of the agency's glaring shortcomings in its handling of the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Its service to disaster victims had been lacking before the storm. Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff said on Monday that his revamping of FEMA would result in changes in every area. One would hope this means the bureaucratic obstacles, the bad planning, and the mismanagement and miscommunication on display in the wake of Katrina - and still occurring today - will be tackled aggressively.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
Maryland will receive federal disaster funding to help pay for snow-clearing efforts from a February storm that left a foot and a half of accumulation across parts of the region in a single day, the Federal Emergency Management Agency announced Thursday. No cost estimate from the storm has been released by the state, so it isn't clear how much funding Maryland could get. The funding, distributed through the state, will assist eligible local governments and nonprofits "on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work in Baltimore, Carroll and Howard counties," according to FEMA.
NEWS
December 7, 2012
As much as I respect Dan Rodricks ' work as a columnist, his recent article castigating President Barack Obama for FEMA's decision to deny relief to Worcester and Dorchester counties was curiously conspiratorial ("No hurricane relief, and no good reason," Dec. 6). One would expect Mr. Rodricks to be knowledgeable about the Federal Emergency Management Agency's mandate and the damage thresholds that trigger eligibility for relief. For him to suggest that President Obama would personally direct or deny relief to any community based on political considerations is disappointing and uncharacteristic of Mr. Rodricks' body of work.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2011
Baltimore County will receive more than $4 million in federal funds to help cover the costs of snow cleanup after the back-to-back blizzards in February last year. The assistance, approved Wednesday by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, will cover 75 percent of the county's spending on snow removal, including labor and overtime, road salt and contractor services. It represents a 75 percent federal share of the county's spending. FEMA officials said they had also approved more than $1 million in weather disaster assistance to the State Highway Administration, and almost $6.5 million to Montgomery County.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski joined a bipartisan chorus of lawmakers Monday calling on the Obama administration to speed up the implementation of a law intended to mitigate increases in flood insurance premiums. In a letter to Craig Fugate, administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, Mikulski wrote that families on the Eastern Shore whose homes are located in the state's floodplain are facing "astronomical increases in their flood insurance premiums. " President Obama signed bipartisan legislation last month to stop those premium increases but several lawmakers have raised concerns that FEMA is not moving quickly enough to implement the law. "Without immediate implementation ... my constituents face enormous increases in their flood insurance premiums which could cause serious financial hardship and even the loss of their homes," the Maryland Democrat wrote.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2010
Maryland will receive more than $15.4 million in federal disaster funds to help state and local governments and some private, non-profit organizations replenish funds expended during last winter's snow storms. The Federal Emergency Management Agency has obligated $14.1 million for costs incurred during the Dec. 18-20 blizzard, and another $1.3 million for expenditures during the Feb. 5-11 storms. Three-quarters of the funds will be made available right away, the agency said. The rest will follow as paperwork is processed.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2012
A Maryland woman pleaded guilty Tuesday to embezzling more than $143,000 from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, where she worked as a human resources analyst, according to the Maryland U.S. attorney's office. Sheila Ann Howard, 56, of Capitol Heights in Prince George's County, began working for FEMA — which responds to disasters across the country such as the recent devastation from superstorm Sandy — as a disaster assistant in 1986, and later served as a staffing clerk and personal assistant, among other positions, prosecutors said.
NEWS
By Nicole Gaouette and Ann Simmons and Nicole Gaouette and Ann Simmons,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 30, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Condemning the bureaucracy at the Federal Emergency Management Agency as "Kafkaesque," a federal judge ordered the government yesterday to immediately resume housing payments to Gulf Coast residents who lost their homes to Hurricane Katrina. Six months after Katrina ravaged the region in August last year, FEMA began ending benefit payments to several thousand families still in temporary housing and unable to return to their homes. U.S. District Judge Richard J. Leon said the agency had violated the evacuees' rights by not adequately explaining why it was ending the benefits, making it difficult for storm victims to appeal the decisions.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2014
Joseph W. McLeary, who served with the city Police Department, Maryland State Police and the Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency during a more than four-decade career, died Sunday of a massive stroke at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 73. "Joe loved the state police, and he carried that into retirement," said state police spokesman Greg Shipley. "It was obvious that being a state police officer was something that never left him. He even still wore the state police haircut," he said.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
Hurricane Sandy blew the waters of the Little Annemessex River into living rooms across the Somerset County town of Crisfield one year ago, displacing hundreds of families, some still homeless a year later. Their numbers began to shrink Monday when charity workers dedicated the first two houses to be rebuilt since the storm. Many others have been repaired. Across the state, thousands in Garrett County endured days without electricity after Sandy dumped more than two feet of unusually wet, heavy snow, and emergency officials managed rescue efforts from a courthouse basement with a slow Internet connection.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2013
Torrey Kurtzner sees the 10 months he signed up to spend at disaster sites across the United States as a springboard into adulthood. The work could take him to the next Moore, Okla., devastated three months ago by a tornado, or the next New Jersey coastline, ravaged last year by Hurricane Sandy. Kurtzner, 20, is one of 162 young people inducted last week into the federal government's newest service opportunity: the FEMA Corps, a partnership between the Federal Emergency Management Agency and AmeriCorps.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2013
President Barack Obama has named an Annapolis man to head the multibillion-dollar grant program through which the Federal Emergency Management Agency helps local governments prepare for disasters. Brian Kamoie, 41, will oversee a vast portfolio of federal grants used by states and cities to prevent and respond to terrorism and other disasters, the White House said. Kamoie was most recently senior director for preparedness policy on the White House national security staff. Kamoie takes control of the FEMA grant program as the Obama administration pursues a controversial consolidation of $2 billion in preparedness funding it says will streamline a system that grew unwieldy following the attacks of Sept.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2013
Members of Maryland's congressional delegation asked the Obama administration Thursday to reconsider its decision to deny federal disaster aid to Garrett County residents walloped by an October snowstorm. In a letter to Federal Emergency Management Agency administrator W. Craig Fugate, the lawmakers said the weather system — produced by Hurricane Sandy — cut power to the county for a week and damaged 23 homes. "Garrett County was hit extremely hard by Hurricane Sandy, and the people of Western Maryland will remember this storm and the damage it did for a long time," said Rep. John Delaney, a Montgomery County lawmaker who signed the letter, along with Sens.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2013
The Federal Emergency Management Agency will grant Baltimore County disaster aid to help pay for damage from Superstorm Sandy, officials announced Thursday. Under the grant program, the federal government will reimburse the county for expenses, including storm preparation, debris removal and damage to public facilities related to the October storm. Officials estimate that storm preparations and damage cost the county $3.4 million, said county public safety spokeswoman Elise Armacost.
NEWS
April 30, 2006
Old-timers in the emergency management game have seen all these pledges of reform and restructure many times before -- every decade or so when a natural or man-made disaster catches the nation flat-footed. Then, memories of the disaster fade, and the Federal Emergency Management Agency once again becomes an afterthought. Its budget is cut; its status is reduced. Top jobs become sinecures for inexperienced hacks. Unless that pattern is broken, an ambitious new package of recommendations by leaders of the Senate Homeland Security Committee, offered last week in the wake of the nation's "bumbling response" to Hurricane Katrina, will have as little effect as similar reform proposals offered a dozen years ago and a dozen years before that.
NEWS
September 2, 2011
Whether it's a hurricane, a flood, a tornado or an earthquake, Americans count on the Federal Emergency Management Agency to be among the first responders. As the recent example of Hurricane Irene shows, only government can marshal the vast resources needed to quickly bring relief to victims of major disasters, then oversee cleanup and reconstruction efforts in the aftermath. That's why a looming partisan fight in Congress over whether to replenish FEMA's disaster relief account must not be allowed to cripple the agency's ability to carry out its life-saving mission.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | December 26, 2012
The federal government has sent more than $1 million in aid to the Eastern Shore to help victims of Hurricane Sandy and continues to process requests, emergency management officials said Wednesday. The Federal Emergency Management Agency has received 619 applications for assistance since the Obama administration reversed its initial denial and agreed to provide disaster aid to individuals in Somerset County affected by the storm. The city of Crisfield was particularly hard hit by heavy flooding that damaged hundreds of homes.
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