Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFeltsman
IN THE NEWS

Feltsman

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | October 21, 1992
This season's Naval Academy Distinguished Artists Series got off to a distinguished start Friday with a masterful recital by Vladimir Feltsman, the Soviet pianist whose emigration to the United States was a cause celebre in the 1980s.Mr. Feltsman's career in the West began bumpily amid Cold War hype, intense critical scrutiny and the artist's frenetic concert schedule, but it has weathered the storm and he remains very much in demand as one of the world's top-ranked pianists.That certainly was the message of his performance at Alumni Hall.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 4, 1995
When he was a student at the Moscow Conservatory, his teacher used to call Vladimir Feltsman a "white crow.""It meant I was different," Feltsman says.The teacher, Jacob Flier (1912-1977), was not only one of modern Russia's greatest pianists and pedagogues; he was also a shrewd judge of character. Feltsman, who performs tonight at Chizuk Amuno Congregation, is indeed a world-famous piano virtuoso. But he resembles not a whit the image those words connote.Instead of living in Manhattan, the center of America's classical music business, Feltsman chooses New Paltz, N.Y., an upstate community in the Catskills where the chief industries are catering to rock-climbers and cross-country skiers and selling crafts to tourists.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | December 6, 1992
Vladimir Feltsman has escaped from prison twice: the first time was from suffering eight years of indignities as a refusenik in the former Soviet Union; the second was from the celebrity that surrounded him five years ago when he was finally permitted to leave Russia for the United States.Well-publicized efforts by human rights organizations, Jewish groups and politicians such as Sen. Edward Kennedy and former Rep. Jack Kemp to free Feltsman made the pianist famous in the United States before anyone had heard him play a note.
NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | June 11, 1994
Russian pianist Vladimir Feltsman reportedly is preparing to open a new public elementary school for musically gifted children in New York City modeled on the Soviet teaching system. If the plan comes to fruition it would be the first school of its type in the United States.The former Soviet Union was famous not only for the caliber of its performing artists but also for the rigorous programs and excellent facilities it provided for the training of budding talents. The country's enviable record in this area was largely due to a system that stressed early identification and nurturing of musically gifted children -- particularly important for violin and piano players, for whom the development of fine motor skills in early childhood is essential to success in later life.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 4, 1995
When he was a student at the Moscow Conservatory, his teacher used to call Vladimir Feltsman a "white crow.""It meant I was different," Feltsman says.The teacher, Jacob Flier (1912-1977), was not only one of modern Russia's greatest pianists and pedagogues; he was also a shrewd judge of character. Feltsman, who performs tonight at Chizuk Amuno Congregation, is indeed a world-famous piano virtuoso. But he resembles not a whit the image those words connote.Instead of living in Manhattan, the center of America's classical music business, Feltsman chooses New Paltz, N.Y., an upstate community in the Catskills where the chief industries are catering to rock-climbers and cross-country skiers and selling crafts to tourists.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | July 25, 1991
Beethoven's Fourth Piano Concerto is filled with improvisational energy that tests the bounds of form. Last night in Meyerhoff Hall with the Baltimore Symphony and its music director, David Zinman, the pianist Vladimir Feltsman played the piece in a daringly improvisational way.For most of the first movement, however, the Russian-born pianist seemed lost in a maze of his own making: His opening sounded sleepy rather than meditative, his runs wooden rather...
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | October 16, 1992
The late, unlamented Cold War certainly left its mark on the world of music.A lanky Texan pianist named Van Cliburn achieved immortality when he became the first American to win the Tchaikovsky International Competition in 1958.When a Richter, Gilels or Oistrakh came to the United States in periods of diplomatic thaw, the air was as redolent of international summitry as it was of music.And when the Soviets tried to sabotage the career of a young, highly regarded Russian pianist named Vladimir Feltsman because he applied to emigrate to Israel, the Western publicity machine trumpeted the tale of the "the latest Russian lion of the piano" brutally silenced by Communist authorities.
FEATURES
By J.Wynn Rousuck | July 21, 1991
'Wizard of Oz' will mark Theatre on the Hill's 10th seasonAs part of its 10th anniversary summer season, Theatre on the Hill will present "The Wizard of Oz" for three weekends beginning Friday. Curtain times are Fridays and Saturdays at 8 ++ p.m., with matinees Aug. 3 and 10 at 2 p.m., in the Alumni Hall Theatre at Western Maryland College in Westminster. Tickets are $12.50 for adults and $8.50 for children.According to co-director Ira Domser, the production combines material from the L. Frank Baum novel and the 1939 movie musical, and it also features a number -- "The Jitterbug" -- that was cut from the movie.
NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | June 11, 1994
Russian pianist Vladimir Feltsman reportedly is preparing to open a new public elementary school for musically gifted children in New York City modeled on the Soviet teaching system. If the plan comes to fruition it would be the first school of its type in the United States.The former Soviet Union was famous not only for the caliber of its performing artists but also for the rigorous programs and excellent facilities it provided for the training of budding talents. The country's enviable record in this area was largely due to a system that stressed early identification and nurturing of musically gifted children -- particularly important for violin and piano players, for whom the development of fine motor skills in early childhood is essential to success in later life.
FEATURES
By Ernest Imhoff and Ernest Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | May 3, 1991
THE BALTIMORE Symphony Orchestra will play eight outdoor concerts of mixed classical music at Oregon Ridge from June 23 to August 3 and six Summerfest concerts of Beethoven and Barber music at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall July 11-27, leading off with Beethoven's majestic Symphony No. 9.In one change this year, dancing to live bands outside the Meyerhoff will follow every Summerfest concert rather than just the Vienna night. And outside food and drink will be sold after, rather than before, the concerts when it is cooler.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | December 6, 1992
Vladimir Feltsman has escaped from prison twice: the first time was from suffering eight years of indignities as a refusenik in the former Soviet Union; the second was from the celebrity that surrounded him five years ago when he was finally permitted to leave Russia for the United States.Well-publicized efforts by human rights organizations, Jewish groups and politicians such as Sen. Edward Kennedy and former Rep. Jack Kemp to free Feltsman made the pianist famous in the United States before anyone had heard him play a note.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | October 21, 1992
This season's Naval Academy Distinguished Artists Series got off to a distinguished start Friday with a masterful recital by Vladimir Feltsman, the Soviet pianist whose emigration to the United States was a cause celebre in the 1980s.Mr. Feltsman's career in the West began bumpily amid Cold War hype, intense critical scrutiny and the artist's frenetic concert schedule, but it has weathered the storm and he remains very much in demand as one of the world's top-ranked pianists.That certainly was the message of his performance at Alumni Hall.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | October 16, 1992
The late, unlamented Cold War certainly left its mark on the world of music.A lanky Texan pianist named Van Cliburn achieved immortality when he became the first American to win the Tchaikovsky International Competition in 1958.When a Richter, Gilels or Oistrakh came to the United States in periods of diplomatic thaw, the air was as redolent of international summitry as it was of music.And when the Soviets tried to sabotage the career of a young, highly regarded Russian pianist named Vladimir Feltsman because he applied to emigrate to Israel, the Western publicity machine trumpeted the tale of the "the latest Russian lion of the piano" brutally silenced by Communist authorities.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | July 25, 1991
Beethoven's Fourth Piano Concerto is filled with improvisational energy that tests the bounds of form. Last night in Meyerhoff Hall with the Baltimore Symphony and its music director, David Zinman, the pianist Vladimir Feltsman played the piece in a daringly improvisational way.For most of the first movement, however, the Russian-born pianist seemed lost in a maze of his own making: His opening sounded sleepy rather than meditative, his runs wooden rather...
FEATURES
By J.Wynn Rousuck | July 21, 1991
'Wizard of Oz' will mark Theatre on the Hill's 10th seasonAs part of its 10th anniversary summer season, Theatre on the Hill will present "The Wizard of Oz" for three weekends beginning Friday. Curtain times are Fridays and Saturdays at 8 ++ p.m., with matinees Aug. 3 and 10 at 2 p.m., in the Alumni Hall Theatre at Western Maryland College in Westminster. Tickets are $12.50 for adults and $8.50 for children.According to co-director Ira Domser, the production combines material from the L. Frank Baum novel and the 1939 movie musical, and it also features a number -- "The Jitterbug" -- that was cut from the movie.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | May 3, 1991
The most important guest soloists in the six-year history of Summerfest will participate in the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's six-concert series in Meyerhoff Hall this July.The orchestra announced yesterday that soloists in the festival, which takes place between July 11 and July 27, will include violinist Joshua Bell, whom many critics consider today's finest young American violinist and who will play Beethoven's Violin Concerto; the somewhat controversial Soviet emigre pianist Vladimir Feltsman, who will play Beethoven's Fourth Piano Concerto; and the great Brazilian pianist Nelson Freire, who will play Beethoven's "Emperor Concerto."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | October 1, 1993
Here's a prediction: Within the next 10 years, conductor Hans Vonk will be as famous in this country as Kurt Masur or Wolfgang Sawallisch.That opinion is based on the superb Brahms Fourth Symphony the Dutch conductor gave with the Baltimore Symphony two years ago and the even better Tchaikovsky Sixth Symphony he delivered last night with the same orchestra in Meyerhoff Hall.Vonk is well-known in Europe -- he's currently chief conductor of the Cologne Radio Symphony and a former music director of the Dresden State Orchestra -- but the United States is always slow in these matters because we tend to listen to hype more closely than we do to music.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.