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By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2010
Randy Lancaster was at his desk when the computer monitor began to wobble and the floor of his Bowie office building started to sway. He and his colleagues jumped from their seats, scanning hallways and peering out fourth-floor windows. They suspected furniture movers or high winds, but the cause was more unusual: an earthquake. Had they known, Lancaster said, the group of ITT Corp. engineers "probably would have run out of the building." Lancaster was among the many Marylanders to report feeling the effects of a 5.0-magnitude quake with an epicenter near Ottawa that sent shockwaves along the East Coast on Wednesday.
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NEWS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
Even before they signed it, a handful of Major League Baseball owners expressed deep misgivings about a 2005 agreement negotiated by Orioles owner Peter Angelos establishing conditions under which the Montreal Expos would move and become the Washington Nationals. The owners, all members of baseball's executive council, sounded like customers having second thoughts after buying something from an aggressive salesman. They questioned whether Major League Baseball ceded too much to the Orioles for their agreement to share the club's exclusive television territory, according to the minutes of a March 28, 2005, conference call released last week as an exhibit in a court case.
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NEWS
October 17, 2004
DORR EUGENE FELT TIPPENS of Baltimore and Gibson Island, age 80, on Saturday, October 16, 2004. Survived by his wife Doris Willsey Tippens; his children, Rebecca Anne Tippens, Constance Felt Tippens, Dorr Felt Tippens; and his grandchildren, Dmitri Tippens Krushnic and wife Victoria Vantoch, Sasha Collins Krushnic, Madeleine Willsey Tippens, Georges Felt Tippens and Savery Maire Hinton. Memorial Service details will be announced. Instead of flowers, contributions may be made to Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins Hospital or any Hospice.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2014
CHICAGO -- Right-hander Ubaldo Jimenez said his transition to the bullpen was made easier Saturday when the Orioles brought him in following their three-hour, nine-minute rain delay. The delay allowed Jimenez to make his first relief appearance since his major league debut in 2006 with the same routine to which he has been accustomed as a starting pitcher over the past eight seasons. “It's pretty much the same because I had time to get loose,” said Jimenez, who allowed one run in four innings during the Orioles' 7-2 loss.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 3, 2005
WASHINGTON - How ironic it is that just when the use of anonymous news sources was the hot journalistic topic over Newsweek's story about alleged Quran desecration, the most famous such source in American history has now blown his own cover? The revelation by retired FBI official W. Mark Felt that he was the storied "Deep Throat" who helped Washington Post sleuths Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein trigger the resignation of President Richard M. Nixon is a timely reminder of the value of such sources in unearthing government misconduct.
SPORTS
By From Sun staff reports | April 7, 2010
How it happened: Clinging to a 3-2 lead, the Orioles brought in new closer Michael Gonzalez to ice the game. He did not, giving up a game-winning two-run double to Carl Crawford. He said it: "I felt the best I felt all spring. I just didn't get the job done, man. ... I am disgusted by the whole thing." -- Gonzalez on blowing a save opportunity in his first game with the Orioles You said it: "Just great...new season, same result. I had a feeling [ Adam Jones] and [Matt Wieters]
SPORTS
By John Zenor and John Zenor,Special to The Sun | April 8, 1994
COLUMBUS, Ga. -- Sid Fernandez's first stop on the road to Baltimore when without a hitch -- and without a hit.Fernandez, pitching for the Single-A Albany Polecats, held Columbus hitless over three innings. He allowed only two walks, and 28 of his 46 pitches were strikes.The left-hander, recovering from bursitis in his pitching shoulder, struck out four, including the side in the third inning. Fernandez, who was clocked between 83-88 mph through the first two innings, was superb in the first and third innings as he retired the side both times.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | November 9, 1995
Vince Bagli's new book on our old football team arrives just in time for the new football team. The old team was called the Baltimore Colts. The new team is called anything Art Modell wants.Bagli's book, written with Norman L. Macht, is titled "Sundays at 2:00 with the Baltimore Colts." All it does is evoke a 30-year love affair. Can love be lovelier the second time around? Before we consider that, Bagli and Macht remind us how sweet it felt the first time around, when everybody was so much younger.
NEWS
By Dick George | April 15, 1994
IT'S been a year since my near-death computer experience. In that time I've grown as a human being. Sunsets are more beautiful. I notice stars. I'm nicer to dogs.Like many Americans, I use a computer software program to do my income taxes. Last April 14 around 11 p.m. I was finally finished after weeks of work. I felt a little relieved.I had to send in some money, but at least it was done. All I had to do was print it out.Then I noticed a "Final Review" command. The program would check the return for inconsistencies and offer tax-saving ideas.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | May 27, 1991
I hear in Gabriel O'Doherty's voice the faint trace of a brogue his parents brought from Ireland long, long ago. It gives his voice a kind of gentle lilt that soothes and charms. You can understand why young men would open up to him, as if speaking to a kind-hearted uncle, and shed tears on his carpet.This goes back some years, to when we were still burying our dead from Vietnam.O'Doherty, who survived the Korean War, felt special affinity with the boys who returned to the United States in the 1970s as war-fried veterans.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Baltimore County Police Chief Jim Johnson says officers in his department should not have asked to meet with two Dundalk activists after they testified at a County Council work session in Towson this month. The Dundalk residents — a community association president and a former state lawmaker — have said it felt like police intimidation when officers met them at a local library to go over rules for public meetings after they had testified against county plans to redevelop the North Point Government Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
Producers and artists are quick to mythologize their roles in history.  J. Robbins would rather work.  As the frontman of the '90s post-punk band Jawbox, J. Robbins was a self-described “gung-ho touring maniac.” To the Silver Spring native, signing to the major label Atlantic Records and having the group's video for “Savory” played on MTV were accomplishments, but none were as rewarding as seeing the world. “I just loved to tour because I'd be like, 'Look where the band took me - we made it to the West Coast!
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2014
By virtue of having a higher seed, sixth-seeded Notre Dame was considered the home team in Saturday's NCAA tournament semifinal against seventh-seeded Maryland and wore its white jerseys at M&T Bank Stadium. But with the Terps playing about 45 minutes away from their campus in College Park, the stadium had a decided “Fear the Turtle” vibe to it, and the feeling was not lost on Fighting Irish coach Kevin Corrigan. “We were up at Hofstra last week [for the quarterfinals], and I think there were 37 people cheering for us in a sellout crowd of 13,000,” Corrigan quipped, referring to fans pulling for Albany. “I wanted to come to the press conference afterwards and say I apologize to all those people who wanted to see Albany here right now because it was clear that there weren't a lot of people rooting for us. We kind of just kept that mentality this week. Quite honestly, it's kind of funny.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
When the derailed train cars full of hazardous chemicals exploded, a shock wave shot through an adjacent industrial park, shattering windows, cracking concrete and buckling metal paneling and roofs. A year later, the recovery continues. "We're a long way from being back to normal, that's for sure," said Mike Brown, president of Baltimore Windustrial Co., which had one of its warehouses destroyed and another badly damaged. The derailment and blast occurred May 28 after a southbound CSX Transportation train collided with a trash truck at a crossing near Pulaski Highway in Rosedale.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
A Woodlawn man was charged Tuesday with fatally shooting his neighbor, saying he felt "disrespected" when the victim left a Sunday cookout early, according to charging documents. Police said Brandon Jerome Stanfield, 30, shot and killed Michael Jefferson Jr., 39, inside his home on Rocky Brook Court after Jefferson left a cookout before Stanfield's family arrived, one witness told police, according to documents filed in Baltimore County District Court. Officers found Jefferson dead from multiple gunshot wounds inside his home shortly after midnight Monday after receiving reports of shots fired.
NEWS
March 2, 2014
For most of his first term in office, President Barack Obama tended to play down race as a factor in his policy decisions. "I'm not the president of black America," he once said, "I'm the president of the United States of America. " That unifying message was one he continually returned to in his efforts to heal the country's wounded economy during his first years in office, and as the nation's first black president he sometimes even seemed to go out of his way to avoid charges of racial favoritism.
NEWS
By George Flesh | September 18, 1991
MY FIRST abortions, as an intern and resident, caused me no emotional distress. I felt that I was helping a patient solve a serious problem. The fetus was no more than unwanted tissue. Although doing second-trimester abortions sometimes disturbed me, my qualms were easily overcome by ideas of women's rights and free choice. Among most people I respected, the practice of abortion might as well have been part of the Bill of Rights.My discontent began after many hundreds of abortions.I decided to do no more second-trimester abortions when I started my private practice.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2014
The panache and entertaining lifestyle of 1920s Baltimore awaits the buyer who purchases the 88-year-old grand residence at 115 Woodholme Ave. in Baltimore County, currently offered at $889,000. "We've been calling it the '[Great] Gatsby' style of mansion," said listing agent Michael J. Schiff of Keller Williams Realty Baltimore. "It's very over the top; a true showhome for your guests. " Within its two-story, 7,100-square foot interior, the rooms are spacious and elegant. From the marble floor of the center hall foyer, the home's traditional layout boasts substantial rooms that include a formal, sunken living room, dining room, gourmet kitchen, a slate-floored sunroom, a family room with a wood-beam ceiling - and finally, a 19-foot by 45-foot ballroom with custom-painted hardwood floors and a ceiling painted in Victorian-style fashion.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, Kevin Rector and Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2013
Workers at Fort McHenry emerged shortly before 9 a.m. Tuesday to post the sign: "Closed until further notice. No Entry. No trespassing. " Over the next hour, joggers and cyclists pulled up to the gate, stopped, read the notice and turned around. Finally, veteran park ranger Laurie Coughlan followed them out, to begin her indefinite furlough. "Most of us can deal with a day," said the Parkville woman, a 39-year veteran of the National Park Service. "Some people really do live paycheck to paycheck, and they need every penny.
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