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NEWS
November 3, 1993
Italian director Federico Fellini once told an interviewer, "When I am not making movies, I feel I am not alive." For Mr. Fellini, who died this week at age 73, filmmaking was the center of his life and a vocation through which he defined himself as one of the most original artists of the 20th century.To American audiences of the 1960s and '70s, Mr. Fellini's works were the quintessential "foreign films," complex psychological studies that documented the ambiguity of the human condition and straddled the line between the real and the surreal.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2010
"Mickey One" is a runaway movie and a wild curiosity. It's a gorgeous, infuriating American art film from an era when our best moviemakers tried to take the pulse of the nation rather than merely guess the emotional weight of their next-door neighbors. It's weirdly exhilarating to see it on the same screen at the Charles where "mumblecore" and other minimalist aesthetics sometimes rule. Instead of kitchen-sink comedy-drama, it gives us everything- including -the-kitchen-sink comedy-drama.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1994
The Baltimore International Film Festival will continue this week with seven films showing at the Baltimore Museum of Art, 10 Art Museum Drive. Advance tickets are available at the BMA box office at (410) 235-0100. Call (410) 889-1993 for film information.Tonight's features are "Full House," a French psychodrama about the strains of media stardom, at 7:30, and "Fiorile," a sensuous Italian drama about the clash between love andmoney, at 9:15."The Story of a Cheat," a 1936 French film by Sacha Guitry, will be shown at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow, followed by "Out of Sight," a documentary about a blind woman who insisted on her humanity, at 9:15 p.m.Sunday night's feature is "The Life and Times of Allen Ginsberg," at 7, a documentary about the Beat poet that includes interviews with Norman Mailer, Joan Baez and Ken Kesey and Mr. Ginsberg's appearance on William F. Buckley Jr.'s "Firing Line."
NEWS
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2010
It's time for Baltimore to claim William Lindsay Gresham as one of the city's literary native sons and a proper heir to Edgar Allan Poe — and not just because he was born here in 1909. He fits the funk-art aspect of this town as well as James M. Cain or John Waters. In the mid-1940s, he wrote his best book, "Nightmare Alley," about the rise of a ruthless mentalist from carnival hand to spiritual guru, and his fall back to the worst possible sideshow. It was so compelling, original and successful that one of the biggest Hollywood stars of his day, Tyrone Power, begged for the lead role and pushed his studio to produce it. Later audiences would get to know the novel either from that potent, underrated film or from a gaudy, cheap paperback featuring a voluptuous blonde in a two-piece scarlet costume.
FEATURES
June 16, 2000
"8 1/2 Women" Sun score: * 1/2 If Federico Fellini had hated women, rather than found them obsessively fascinating, and if the character played by Marcello Mastroianni had been bisexual, this is the sort of film the Italian master's "8 1/2 " could have been. Peter Greenaway's "8 1/2 Women" proves Fellini made the right choices. Greenaway, who applies the "unsettling" label to his films as a matter of pride (see "Prospero's Books" and "The Cook, the Thief, His Wife and Her Lover"), pays homage to Fellini with this story of a father and son reeling from the death of the older man's wife and the younger man's mother.
NEWS
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 1, 1993
Federico Fellini, the great Italian film director, was so unique an artist that his death yesterday should have been likewise unique. But it wasn't.Instead, the 73-year-old man passed quietly in a coma after suffering a heart attack a month ago and going on a life-support system in a Rome hospital.It was an ironically commonplace end for a man who, loved or loathed, lionized or ignored over his long career, was never commonplace.In fact, so unique was Fellini's vision and accomplishment as a film director that no existing word could quite describe it; one had to be invented.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 3, 2003
The luckiest day in Federico Fellini's life may have been the day the circus sent him packing. Fellini, the subject of a month-long film series beginning tonight at the Creative Alliance in Highlandtown, was only 7 at the time, and the middle-class life his parents had made for themselves in the small Italian village of Rimini wasn't doing it for him. Like many kids, he dreamed of something more exciting, more splendid, more colorful. So he ran away from his boarding school and linked up with a traveling circus for a life of clowns and jugglers and animals and people who in their day would have been called freaks.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 16, 2004
When an interviewer pressed Federico Fellini to explain the mysterious complexities of his 1953 masterpiece I Vitelloni (a restored print premieres today at the AFI Silver Theatre in Silver Spring), the maestro said, simply, "It's the story of men who haven't grown up, and the infantile state is ambiguous. There can be no heroic posturings, no virile poses." I Vitelloni portrays small-town loafers - today they might be called "slackers" - who dream of Rome or Milan while pursuing aimless flirtations and frivolities.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun Film Critic | June 6, 1999
I almost didn't see "8 1/2 " again. A press screening of Federico Fellini's 1963 film, which opened at the Charles on Friday, was scheduled during a particularly harried week. When that Friday rolled around, my eyes were, as we say in the trade, seriously bleeding. "How big a deal would it be if I canceled?" I wondered. "I must have seen '8 1/2 ' a dozen times by now."My conscience won the day, and I went to the Charles anyway. And what I saw was a brand new movie. It wasn't just the sparkling new 35 mm print, with its velvet blacks and dazzling whites.
FEATURES
By ROGER MOORE and ROGER MOORE,ORLANDO SENTINEL | March 24, 2006
Fellini isn't making movies anymore, being dead and all these past 12 years. But there is Michael Winterbottom, indulgent, inspired, self-lacerating bad boy of British cinema. His goofy, messy version of Tristram Shandy puts the Fellini back in "Fellini-esque." Tristram Shandy: A Cock and Bull Story (Revolutions Films) Starring Steve Coogan, Rob Brydon, Shirley Henderson. Directed by Michael Winterbottom. Rated R. Time 91 minutes.
FEATURES
By Michael Phillips and Michael Phillips,Tribune Newspapers critic | December 25, 2009
Eight and a half reasons "Nine" is a mixed bag: One:: It's underweight. Based on Fellini's exhilarating "8 1/2," "Nine" contains a fraction of the story material even a simple show such as "Chicago" handed its cinematic adapters. On Broadway, with Raul Julia starring in the original, beautiful Tommy Tune staging, "Nine" moved so fluidly you didn't notice what wasn't there. Same with the starring Antonio Banderas. Two:: The movie is shot and edited like a two-hour trailer for itself.
NEWS
By Linda Winer and Linda Winer,Newsday | October 29, 2006
NEW YORK -- In The Times They Are A-Changin', Twyla Tharp's fascinating but ultimately derailed circus musical with Bob Dylan songs, dancers literally jump through hoops. They also tumble above the stage on trampolines, cavort on stilts, jump rope so fast we lose sight of the ropes and tie their limbs into shapes that mere mortals should not imagine. For all the gorgeous and diabolical virtuosity, however, this 90-minute experiment, which opened last week on Broadway, gets lost in its own messy - all right, preachy - allegorical ambitions.
FEATURES
By ROGER MOORE and ROGER MOORE,ORLANDO SENTINEL | March 24, 2006
Fellini isn't making movies anymore, being dead and all these past 12 years. But there is Michael Winterbottom, indulgent, inspired, self-lacerating bad boy of British cinema. His goofy, messy version of Tristram Shandy puts the Fellini back in "Fellini-esque." Tristram Shandy: A Cock and Bull Story (Revolutions Films) Starring Steve Coogan, Rob Brydon, Shirley Henderson. Directed by Michael Winterbottom. Rated R. Time 91 minutes.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 16, 2004
When an interviewer pressed Federico Fellini to explain the mysterious complexities of his 1953 masterpiece I Vitelloni (a restored print premieres today at the AFI Silver Theatre in Silver Spring), the maestro said, simply, "It's the story of men who haven't grown up, and the infantile state is ambiguous. There can be no heroic posturings, no virile poses." I Vitelloni portrays small-town loafers - today they might be called "slackers" - who dream of Rome or Milan while pursuing aimless flirtations and frivolities.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 3, 2003
The luckiest day in Federico Fellini's life may have been the day the circus sent him packing. Fellini, the subject of a month-long film series beginning tonight at the Creative Alliance in Highlandtown, was only 7 at the time, and the middle-class life his parents had made for themselves in the small Italian village of Rimini wasn't doing it for him. Like many kids, he dreamed of something more exciting, more splendid, more colorful. So he ran away from his boarding school and linked up with a traveling circus for a life of clowns and jugglers and animals and people who in their day would have been called freaks.
FEATURES
June 16, 2000
"8 1/2 Women" Sun score: * 1/2 If Federico Fellini had hated women, rather than found them obsessively fascinating, and if the character played by Marcello Mastroianni had been bisexual, this is the sort of film the Italian master's "8 1/2 " could have been. Peter Greenaway's "8 1/2 Women" proves Fellini made the right choices. Greenaway, who applies the "unsettling" label to his films as a matter of pride (see "Prospero's Books" and "The Cook, the Thief, His Wife and Her Lover"), pays homage to Fellini with this story of a father and son reeling from the death of the older man's wife and the younger man's mother.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 4, 1999
Since its initial release 36 years ago, Federico Fellini's "8 1/2" has become such a filmmaker's talisman, quoted in almost every student film and Woody Allen movie you can think of, that it's difficult to take it on its own terms -- as a great film, no more, no less.Happily, the task has been made easier by the recent re-release of the film on a gloriously restored 35 millimeter black and white print, which arrives at the Charles Theatre today. And a fresh look at the movie many considered Fellini's masterpiece reveals a work that is as funny, glamorous, ingenious and morally relevant as it was the first day it was screened.
NEWS
March 24, 1994
* Bishop Alvaro del Portillo, 80, leader of the controversial and conservative Roman Catholic organization Opus Dei, died of a heart attack yesterday in Rome. The bishop, a Spaniard, had been Opus Dei's leader since the death of the organization's founder, Monsignor Josemaria Escriva de Balaguer, in 1975. Opus Dei (God's Work) has 77,000 lay members worldwide who receive spiritual guidance from the movement's 1,500 priests. The organization has for decades fended off criticism from liberal Catholics who accuse it of being secretive and elitist and of trying to create a church within the church.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun Film Critic | June 6, 1999
I almost didn't see "8 1/2 " again. A press screening of Federico Fellini's 1963 film, which opened at the Charles on Friday, was scheduled during a particularly harried week. When that Friday rolled around, my eyes were, as we say in the trade, seriously bleeding. "How big a deal would it be if I canceled?" I wondered. "I must have seen '8 1/2 ' a dozen times by now."My conscience won the day, and I went to the Charles anyway. And what I saw was a brand new movie. It wasn't just the sparkling new 35 mm print, with its velvet blacks and dazzling whites.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 4, 1999
Since its initial release 36 years ago, Federico Fellini's "8 1/2" has become such a filmmaker's talisman, quoted in almost every student film and Woody Allen movie you can think of, that it's difficult to take it on its own terms -- as a great film, no more, no less.Happily, the task has been made easier by the recent re-release of the film on a gloriously restored 35 millimeter black and white print, which arrives at the Charles Theatre today. And a fresh look at the movie many considered Fellini's masterpiece reveals a work that is as funny, glamorous, ingenious and morally relevant as it was the first day it was screened.
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