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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | May 4, 2000
Four seasons ago Fell'sPoint Corner Theatre produced the sparkling Baltimore premiere of David Ives' "All in the Timing." Beginning tomorrow, the same theater will present the local premiere of Ives' subsequent collection of short comedies, "Mere Mortals." Originally produced off-Broadway in 1997, "Mere Mortals" takes theater-goers to settings ranging from a miniature golf course to a girder on a Manhattan high-rise construction site. The subject matter whirls from mayflies in love to a David Mamet spoof.
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NEWS
September 21, 2012
Robert Moses told Baltimore to put a highway through Mount Vernon Square. Aren't you glad Baltimore did not listen? William Donald Schaefer and every public official in Maryland wanted to put an interstate highway through Fell's Point that would have run inches from the Fish Market, the Power Plant, the Shot Tower and the Carroll Mansion. Aren't you glad preservationists (and the National Historic Preservation Act) said "no?" Isn't a revitalized Inner Harbor East better? Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake: Save the Morris Mechanic Theatre.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By SUN STAFF | July 17, 2003
`Turtle Soup' Three friends head to a cabin in West Virginia, an annual event that's been a part of their lives for almost 30 years, and end up facing challenges they didn't expect in the play Turtle Soup. Part of the Balti- more Playwrights Festival, Soup opens tonight at Fell's Point Corner Theatre and runs Thursdays-Sundays until Aug. 3. Turtle Soup was written by Baltimore playwright Anne M. Lefter, and directed by Miriam Bazensky and produced by Uncommon Voices. Fell's Point Corner Theatre is at 251 S. Ann St. Show times are 8 p.m. on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays and 7 p.m. on Sundays.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | March 21, 2012
The head of the Fells Prospect Community Association, Victor Corbin, wrote me to add his voice to a chorus of complaints about St. Patrick's Daycelebrations. As we've reported, police wrongly allowed people to drink in O'Donnell Square in Canton, creating a mess akin to the Preakness infield. That has sparked a debate of civic responsibility versus police enforcement. The cops have stepped up and taken blame for failing to shut down the outdoor party, but also warned that we don't live in a police state, and it shouldn't be a cop's job to ensure societal norms are upheld each time we leave our houses.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | December 10, 1998
As its annual holiday presentation, Fell's Point Corner Theatre is once again showcasing the students in its Children's Theatre Program, who will appear with experienced community theater actors in the Charles Dickens classic "A Christmas Carol."Mark Lewis directs the production, which stars Sandy Alexander as Scrooge and Gareth Kelly as Jacob Marley. Each performance will also feature a Christmas bazaar, offering items ranging from crafts to baked goods. Proceeds help provide scholarships for the children's program.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | August 20, 1998
"The Fever of Warmth and Darkness," the final play in this year's Baltimore Playwrights Festival, opens tonight at Fell's Point Corner Theatre's upstairs Sokal Theatre.Written and directed by and starring Tim Marks, the play focuses on "an amoral man who is unable to resist the lure of a new seduction," according to the playwright, who also describes it as "the most uncomfortable play I have written." It is being produced by Uncommon Voices Theatre Company, a new local company that sprang up, in part, out of a strong belief in this play.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | October 30, 1997
Last month Arena Stage in Washington opened its season with a highly unconventional production of the 1930s comedy "Room Service," with the four Flying Karamazov Brothers playing all the roles. If you want to see what this John Murray and Allen Boretz play is really about, however, you can drop by Fell's Point Corner Theatre beginning tomorrow.Bob Tull, in the role of a deadbeat theatrical producer, heads a cast that also features Bryan Dingle, Molly Moores and Patrick Trainor. Direction is by Steve Goldklang.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | August 29, 1993
From The Sun Aug. 29-Sept 4, 1843Aug. 29: We saw yesterday a rare and beautiful bird called the Bill Bird, brought in the schooner Roxana from the coast of St. Blas, between Porto Bello and Carthagena.Sept. 1: Fell's Point -- The general improvement that has taken place in the appearance of Fell's Point within a few years past, cannot fail to be observed by all who have occasion to pass through its limits.From The Sun Aug. 29-Sept. 4, 1893Aug. 29: Yesterday was a busy day at the county fair grounds at Timonium.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | October 25, 2001
The Dying Gaul, a psychological thriller that unfolds in Tinseltown and cyberspace, opens tomorrowat Fell's Point Corner Theatre. Written by playwright and screenwriter Craig Lucas (Prelude to a Kiss, Reckless), The Dying Gaul focuses on a screenwriter whose integrity is compromised when a film producer demands major changes in a screenplay. The Fell's Point Corner Theatre's production is directed by Steve Goldklang and features Stephen Antonsen, Patrick Martyn, William Runnebaum and Susan Scher.
FEATURES
By Karin Remesch | September 20, 1999
Fell's Point Corner Theatre. "Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde." 7: 30 p.m. tomorrow at the theater, 251 S. Ann St. Needed are several men ages 18 to 25, and one man to play Oscar Wilde in his 40s. Be prepared to read from script. Call 410-466-8341.Movie extras. For John Waters' new feature film "Cecil B. DeMented," starring Melanie Griffith and Stephen Dorff. The film will be shot entirely on location in Baltimore, beginning the first week of October. Though all ages are needed, teen-agers through early 20s are especially being sought.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Reporter | March 25, 2008
You can't keep a stubborn apostrophe down. To this day, people milling about the funky waterfront neighborhood of Fells Point note for themselves the roving apostrophe attached to the town with the grammatically split personality. Consider: Fell's Point Visitors Center, Fells Point Development Corp., Society for the Preservation of Federal Hill and Fell's Point, Fells Point Historic District, and the Fell's Point Citizens on Patrol. What's a grammarian to do? "It makes me wince because I'm an English major," says Ellen von Karajan, executive director of the Fell's Point preservation society.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | February 18, 2008
Some time in the next two months, artist Cinder Hypki will install a piece of mosaic with the logo FPCT -- for Fell's Point Corner Theatre -- into the sidewalk outside a three-story converted firehouse on South Ann Street. The marker will represent the newest phase in the company's life, which began a few weeks ago when it officially purchased the building it has occupied for more than two decades, and into which it has poured more than $500,000 in improvements. Talk about a concrete symbol of success.
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 25, 2006
"Art isn't easy," states a lyric in Sunday in the Park with George. That statement goes double - at least - for this Stephen Sondheim-James Lapine musical about 19th-century French pointillist painter Georges Seurat. In his impressive production at Fell's Point Corner Theatre, director Bill Kamberger doesn't make easy work of this challenging musical; that would violate the spirit of the material. But he has assembled an admirable cast, and, in the relatively tight quarters at Fell's Point Corner, he has found inventive ways to stage this complex look at creativity.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 26, 2005
A young woman is released from prison at the beginning of The Spitfire Grill, the small-scale musical receiving a lilting, uplifting Maryland premiere at Fell's Point Corner Theatre. Percy Talbott has chosen to serve her parole in Gilead, Wis., a rural town she picked out of a travel magazine. Although the town is named for a biblical setting where David found refuge, the people Percy meets in its Midwestern namesake are in prisons of their own. Hannah, the gruff widow who runs the Spitfire and reluctantly employs Percy, is trapped by the desolation left by her husband's death and the missing-in-action status of her soldier son, Eli. Her nephew, Caleb, is imprisoned by his inability to live up to Eli's heroic example, and Caleb's wife Shelby is imprisoned by her husband's discontent.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2004
Fell's Point opens season Fell's Point Corner Theatre opens its season tomorrow with the Baltimore premiere of Edward Albee's The Play About the Baby. Focusing on two couples - a pair of young parents called simply Boy and Girl and an older couple called Man and Woman - the play debuted in London in 1998 and was produced off-Broadway in 2001. Despite conjecture that the baby in the title might be a fantasy and that the play bears a connection to Albee's 1962 Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 15, 2003
There's a scene in Margaret Edson's 1999 Pulitzer Prize-winning play Wit in which a professor vehemently defends the use of a modest comma over a "hysterical" semicolon in the last line of the John Donne sonnet beginning, "Death be not proud." When punctuated properly, "Nothing but a breath - a comma - separates life from life everlasting," she explains. This may sound like nitpicking, but that comma, that breath, is the brief space in which Wit takes place. The play is an account of the valiant but futile battle waged by Vivian Bearing, a world-class John Donne scholar, against stage four metastatic ovarian cancer; there is no stage five, as she matter-of-factly informs us. Dedicated to literary research, Vivian now becomes equally dedicated to being a medical guinea pig. But as she discovers, studying and being studied are very different pursuits.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | January 15, 1998
Jean Genet's absurdist drama, "The Maids," opens tomorrow at Fell's Point Corner Theatre. An examination of role reversal, power, betrayal and morality, "The Maids" is the first offering in a winter series that Fell's Point Corner is calling its "Absurd as Always Festival."The other plays in the festival are two one-acts, Tom Stoppard's "After Magritte" and Robert Anderson's "I'm Herbert," which open next month. Directed by Alex Willis, "The Maids" stars Helena Pechacek as Madame and Paris Obligin and Stacey Werling as her treacherous domestic servants.
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