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By James J. Zogby | August 7, 2001
WASHINGTON - The Senate's confirmation of Douglas J. Feith as undersecretary of defense for policy is a classic illustration of the dangerous abuses inherent in the revolving door that operates between government and private industry. Mr. Feith is a political appointee who has used his time in government to build relations that can be used for business purposes, and then returns to government. As the Pentagon's policy chief, his responsibilities include: Developing policy on the conduct of alliances and defense relationships with foreign governments and their military establishments.
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NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,jill.rosen@baltsun.com | January 22, 2009
Michelle Obama, who dazzled the fashion world by choosing Inauguration Day outfits from two almost-unknown designers, made another obscure artist's day yesterday with the dress she wore to a prayer service at the Washington National Cathedral. The first lady wore a Tracy Feith retro-inspired dress to the church service. The dress, which Feith calls "Yoka Yoka Garden," looks like a vintage frock pulled from the costume department of TV's Mad Men, with its slim bodice, full skirt and three-quarter sleeves.
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NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,jill.rosen@baltsun.com | January 22, 2009
Michelle Obama, who dazzled the fashion world by choosing Inauguration Day outfits from two almost-unknown designers, made another obscure artist's day yesterday with the dress she wore to a prayer service at the Washington National Cathedral. The first lady wore a Tracy Feith retro-inspired dress to the church service. The dress, which Feith calls "Yoka Yoka Garden," looks like a vintage frock pulled from the costume department of TV's Mad Men, with its slim bodice, full skirt and three-quarter sleeves.
NEWS
By Greg Miller and Greg Miller,Los Angeles Times | February 10, 2007
WASHINGTON -- As the Bush administration began assembling its case for war, analysts across the U.S. intelligence community were disturbed by the report of a secret Pentagon team that concluded that Iraq had significant ties to al-Qaida. Analysts from the CIA and other agencies "disagreed with more than 50 percent" of 26 findings that the Pentagon team laid out in a controversial paper, according to testimony yesterday from Thomas F. Gimble, the acting inspector general of the Pentagon.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 30, 2002
KABUL, Afghanistan - A top Pentagon official said yesterday that the United States will remain committed to ensuring Afghanistan's stability even as the war on terrorism shifts elsewhere. Faced with a shortfall in promised financial aid and a diversion of U.S. attention to Iraq, some Afghan officials and international observers have voiced concern that Afghanistan could slide into the instability and chaos it suffered during two decades of civil war. But Douglas J. Feith, U.S. undersecretary of defense for policy, suggested that his visit to the Afghan capital was designed in part to allay those concerns.
NEWS
By Greg Miller and Greg Miller,Los Angeles Times | February 10, 2007
WASHINGTON -- As the Bush administration began assembling its case for war, analysts across the U.S. intelligence community were disturbed by the report of a secret Pentagon team that concluded that Iraq had significant ties to al-Qaida. Analysts from the CIA and other agencies "disagreed with more than 50 percent" of 26 findings that the Pentagon team laid out in a controversial paper, according to testimony yesterday from Thomas F. Gimble, the acting inspector general of the Pentagon.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 5, 2003
WASHINGTON - Two high-ranking Defense Department officials denied yesterday that a special Pentagon intelligence unit manipulated information on Iraq's weapons programs and links to al-Qaida in an effort to build public and political support for war. In an unusual news conference, Undersecretary of Defense for Policy Douglas Feith and his deputy, William Luti, said the Office of Special Plans was never told to produce evidence that Saddam Hussein's regime...
TOPIC
By Jacob Heilbrunn and Jacob Heilbrunn,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 20, 2004
Neoconservatism is finished. According to the conventional wisdom, the Pentagon's top neocons, like Paul D. Wolfowitz, Douglas J. Feith and William J. Luti, have been discredited by the insurgency in Iraq, by Abu Ghraib and by growing public discontent with the war. The United Nations has been invited back - begged, really - while the organization's chief opponent, Richard Perle, has been marginalized. The exposure of Iraqi exile leader Ahmad Chalabi as a charlatan, and possibly an Iranian spy, has delivered the knockout punch.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | May 20, 2005
PHILADELPHIA - If you want to understand why things are going so badly in Iraq, read the profile of Douglas Feith, the No. 3 man at the Pentagon, in the May 9 issue of The New Yorker. Mr. Feith, who will soon step down as undersecretary of defense for policy, was the Pentagon's man in charge of planning for postwar Iraq. He disagrees that the bitter Iraqi insurgency might have been preventable and denies the administration thought the postwar would be easy. He insists that the Pentagon foresaw the "chilling contingencies" that could follow the war. OK. Never mind that Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz told me in November 2002 that he would be "astonished" if there were instability in postwar Iraq and said the operable historical analogy would be post-World War II France.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | May 17, 1996
MIAMI -- With the help of a workhorse helicopter, investigators waged a macabre tug-of-war with the Everglades muck yesterday, yanking out bigger and bigger chunks of the fallen ValuJet DC-9, including parts of the fuselage, wings and landing gear.These new pieces, along with the two engines pulled from the mud around dawn, will help accident reconstructionists assemble a two-dimensional model of the jetliner, now taking shape inside a hangar at Tamiami Airport.The effort was as remarkable for what the huge Hi-Lift chopper pulled out as it was for what it failed to dislodge from the oozing peat below: One big section of either a wing or a fuselage was so deeply embedded in the muck that "we couldn't get ahold of it," said Robert Francis, vice chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | May 20, 2005
PHILADELPHIA - If you want to understand why things are going so badly in Iraq, read the profile of Douglas Feith, the No. 3 man at the Pentagon, in the May 9 issue of The New Yorker. Mr. Feith, who will soon step down as undersecretary of defense for policy, was the Pentagon's man in charge of planning for postwar Iraq. He disagrees that the bitter Iraqi insurgency might have been preventable and denies the administration thought the postwar would be easy. He insists that the Pentagon foresaw the "chilling contingencies" that could follow the war. OK. Never mind that Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz told me in November 2002 that he would be "astonished" if there were instability in postwar Iraq and said the operable historical analogy would be post-World War II France.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | August 27, 2004
CHICAGO -- On Sept. 10, 2001, Undersecretary of Defense Douglas Feith arrived in Moscow to discuss the administration's efforts to protect Americans from being slaughtered by enemies striking out of a clear blue sky. President Bush, you see, saw the danger and was taking action. His chief defense initiative in his first eight months in office was to build a national missile defense to knock down any ballistic missiles launched against us. The next day, the American people discovered that North Korean missiles were not the chief peril facing the nation.
TOPIC
By Jacob Heilbrunn and Jacob Heilbrunn,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 20, 2004
Neoconservatism is finished. According to the conventional wisdom, the Pentagon's top neocons, like Paul D. Wolfowitz, Douglas J. Feith and William J. Luti, have been discredited by the insurgency in Iraq, by Abu Ghraib and by growing public discontent with the war. The United Nations has been invited back - begged, really - while the organization's chief opponent, Richard Perle, has been marginalized. The exposure of Iraqi exile leader Ahmad Chalabi as a charlatan, and possibly an Iranian spy, has delivered the knockout punch.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 5, 2003
WASHINGTON - Two high-ranking Defense Department officials denied yesterday that a special Pentagon intelligence unit manipulated information on Iraq's weapons programs and links to al-Qaida in an effort to build public and political support for war. In an unusual news conference, Undersecretary of Defense for Policy Douglas Feith and his deputy, William Luti, said the Office of Special Plans was never told to produce evidence that Saddam Hussein's regime...
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 30, 2002
KABUL, Afghanistan - A top Pentagon official said yesterday that the United States will remain committed to ensuring Afghanistan's stability even as the war on terrorism shifts elsewhere. Faced with a shortfall in promised financial aid and a diversion of U.S. attention to Iraq, some Afghan officials and international observers have voiced concern that Afghanistan could slide into the instability and chaos it suffered during two decades of civil war. But Douglas J. Feith, U.S. undersecretary of defense for policy, suggested that his visit to the Afghan capital was designed in part to allay those concerns.
TOPIC
By William D. Hartung and William D. Hartung,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 23, 2001
THE TIMING OF the Bush administration's recent decision to give Russia six months' notice of its intent to withdraw from the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty seemed peculiar in the extreme. Why risk alienating Russia, China, and major U.S. allies in Europe in pursuit of a technologically unproven, immensely expensive ballistic missile defense system? And why abandon the ABM Treaty now, when experts like the Pentagon's former top testing official, Philip Coyle, have indicated that an effective missile defense testing program can go on for years before it runs up against the limits imposed by the agreement?
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 14, 1996
MIAMI -- Recovery teams scored a success in their struggle against the Everglades yesterday, pulling from the mire the flight data recorder of ValuJet Flight 592, which crashed and disappeared into the marsh Saturday.Evidence was mounting that the DC-9 disintegrated as it plunged nose first into the ground. Investigators said the plane apparently fell 7,500 feet in its last 40 seconds.In the third day of the search, workers found no sizable pieces of the fuselage. Instead, crews found only small parts of the bodies of the 109 people who died -- but not an identifiable victim.
TOPIC
By William D. Hartung and William D. Hartung,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 23, 2001
THE TIMING OF the Bush administration's recent decision to give Russia six months' notice of its intent to withdraw from the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty seemed peculiar in the extreme. Why risk alienating Russia, China, and major U.S. allies in Europe in pursuit of a technologically unproven, immensely expensive ballistic missile defense system? And why abandon the ABM Treaty now, when experts like the Pentagon's former top testing official, Philip Coyle, have indicated that an effective missile defense testing program can go on for years before it runs up against the limits imposed by the agreement?
NEWS
By James J. Zogby | August 7, 2001
WASHINGTON - The Senate's confirmation of Douglas J. Feith as undersecretary of defense for policy is a classic illustration of the dangerous abuses inherent in the revolving door that operates between government and private industry. Mr. Feith is a political appointee who has used his time in government to build relations that can be used for business purposes, and then returns to government. As the Pentagon's policy chief, his responsibilities include: Developing policy on the conduct of alliances and defense relationships with foreign governments and their military establishments.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | May 17, 1996
MIAMI -- With the help of a workhorse helicopter, investigators waged a macabre tug-of-war with the Everglades muck yesterday, yanking out bigger and bigger chunks of the fallen ValuJet DC-9, including parts of the fuselage, wings and landing gear.These new pieces, along with the two engines pulled from the mud around dawn, will help accident reconstructionists assemble a two-dimensional model of the jetliner, now taking shape inside a hangar at Tamiami Airport.The effort was as remarkable for what the huge Hi-Lift chopper pulled out as it was for what it failed to dislodge from the oozing peat below: One big section of either a wing or a fuselage was so deeply embedded in the muck that "we couldn't get ahold of it," said Robert Francis, vice chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board.
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