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By Tamara Lytle and Sean Mussenden and Tamara Lytle and Sean Mussenden,ORLANDO SENTINEL | March 18, 2005
WASHINGTON - Terri Schiavo's feeding tube will be removed today at 1 p.m. unless a House committee succeeds in a last-minute effort to issue subpoenas that would stop doctors from doing so. An extraordinary legislative maneuver announced early today comes after the House and Senate failed to agree on legislation to keep the woman alive before leaving Washington for their spring break. House officials hope that the subpoenas will stop doctors from removing the badly brain-damaged woman's feeding tube.
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NEWS
By Melissa Broome | May 16, 2014
When my four-year-old son was recently discharged after undergoing facial reconstructive surgery at Johns Hopkins Children's Center, many friends and family members asked how I was holding up, how I was handling the stress and lack of sleep and all that comes with spending a week in a hospital. Those who have been through the experience know that the last thing you're thinking about is yourself. Being at a children's hospital - especially one as world renowned as Hopkins - was one of the most humbling experiences that I will ever have.
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NEWS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | February 12, 2005
A Pinellas County, Fla., circuit judge dealt another legal blow to the parents of Terri Schiavo yesterday by refusing to set aside a ruling that calls for the removal of the feeding tube that has sustained their daughter for 15 years. Although the decision closes another door on Bob and Mary Schindler, it will not end their efforts to keep their daughter alive in a right-to-die case that has pitted them against their son-in-law for seven years. An attorney for the Schindlers said they will appeal the latest order and ask the U.S. Supreme to review another issue.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,Sun reporter | May 27, 2007
Sitting upright and alert on her hospital bed's white sheets, Keonya Christian-Cannon was still in her rainbow-heart pajamas, but she was ready to go home. Keonya, 14, had been recuperating at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center for more than a month, after a stray bullet struck her as she walked across the street from a park near her West Baltimore home. The bullet tore into her abdomen, just below her rib cage. She is one of at least 280 people - 50 of them juveniles - who have been shot, but not killed, in the city this year and a painful example of the many who survive, virtually unnoticed by a city struggling with a surging homicide toll.
NEWS
By Kansas City Star | January 27, 1993
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- In an unceremonious end to a highly publicized case, the Missouri Supreme Court used just eight words to clear the way for Christine Busalacchi's family to remove her feeding tube.But the Busalacchi family announced yesterday that despite the court's decision, the brain-damaged woman would continue receiving medical treatment."The family has decided that for the foreseeable future Christine will remain in the state hospital in St. Louis, receiving all of the care she now receives," said the Busalacchi family's attorney, William Colby.
NEWS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | February 22, 2005
CLEARWATER, Fla. - Unless a court grants her parents another delay, Michael Schiavo plans to remove the feeding tube keeping his wife alive early this afternoon, allowing the severely brain-damaged woman to die. An attorney for Schiavo said he is authorized to remove the life support for his wife as soon as the 2nd District Court of Appeal issues an order that finalizes its last ruling against his in-laws in their seven-year legal battle to keep their...
NEWS
By Sean Mussenden and Maya Bell and Sean Mussenden and Maya Bell,THE ORLANDO SENTINEL | October 23, 2003
CLEARWATER, Fla. - A judge agreed yesterday to appoint a special guardian for Terri Schiavo, the severely brain-damaged woman whose case has set off a legal firestorm in Florida. But it was unclear exactly how broad the guardian's powers will be, or how he or she might affect Michael Schiavo's ability to make medical decisions on behalf of his wife. Schiavo's feeding tube was reinserted yesterday, and she was returned to the Pinellas Park hospice where she has lived for more than three years, her father, Bob Schindler, said last night.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 26, 2005
PINELLAS PARK, Fla. - Inside what is described as a bare hospice room with an armed police officer seated next to her bed, Terri Schiavo continued the slow process of dying yesterday. Outside, beyond earshot and out of view, protesters were hoping for a last-ditch court victory ordering the reinsertion of Schiavo's feeding tube. With the start of Easter weekend, the scene outside the central Florida hospice was charged with religious overtones. A priest held Good Friday services, and the crowd sang hymns.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2003
Relatives of a woman who was fed to death in a city nursing home have filed a lawsuit in Baltimore Circuit Court charging the home's owners with malpractice, wrongful death and then with trying to cover up their errors. The suit, filed yesterday, charges that staff members at Villa St. Michael Nursing and Retirement Center at 4800 Seton Drive in Northwest Baltimore caused the death of 89-year-old Bertha Small when they failed to follow her doctor's orders on the use of a feeding tube. Small's death in November sparked efforts to pass a state law requiring the state to notify relatives of nursing home patients who state inspectors have concluded received poor nursing home care.
NEWS
By Maya Bell and John Kennedy and Maya Bell and John Kennedy,ORLANDO SENTINEL | February 24, 2005
CLEARWATER, Fla. - A judge barred the removal of Terri Schiavo's feeding tube yesterday for 48 more hours, while in a surprise move the state's social welfare agency asked for an indefinite delay to investigate potential abuse of the severely brain-damaged woman. Pinellas Circuit Judge George Greer's decision to bar Michael Schiavo from removing his wife's feeding tube until at least 5 p.m. tomorrow was not related to a request by the state Department of Children & Families to intervene in the closely watched case.
NEWS
By JUDITH GRAHAM and JUDITH GRAHAM,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 2, 2006
A year after Terri Schiavo's death, there is no forgetting or forgiving for her divided family, whose struggle over withdrawing life support for the brain-injured woman transfixed the nation. Far from it, the bitter feud goes on in dueling "tell-all" books being published by Schiavo's husband and her parents this week. Both are scathing attempts to settle accounts; neither party has found any measure of reconciliation, they acknowledge. Both sides have also started organizations to wage their battle in the public arena.
NEWS
By LAURA KING and LAURA KING,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 12, 2006
JERUSALEM -- Prime Minister Ariel Sharon survived his latest medical crisis yesterday - one that has served, somewhat poignantly, to underscore the degree to which the Israeli political torch has passed to his successor, Ehud Olmert. The 77-year-old leader, who has been comatose since a massive stroke more than five weeks ago, was said by doctors to be out of immediate danger after emergency surgery yesterday in which about 1 1/2 feet of his large intestine were removed. Shlomo Mor-Yosef, director of Hadassah University Medical Center at Ein Kerem, told reporters at the hospital that Sharon, who has been unconscious since a catastrophic cerebral hemorrhage Jan. 4, had come through four hours of surgery safely.
NEWS
By LYNN ANDERSON and LYNN ANDERSON,SUN REPORTER | December 14, 2005
A 2-year-old girl on a feeding tube and other foster children were temporarily housed in a Baltimore office, months after state officials promised to stop using the impromptu shelter because it lacked proper bedding, toiletries and medical supplies. The shelter operates illegally because it does not have a license. State officials promised to close it in June. Yesterday, Advocates for Children and Youth, a nonprofit organization, reported that the shelter was still open. In September, a 2-year-old girl on a feeding tube spent at least one night at the Gay Street office even though her caretaker had given city social service officials three weeks' notice that she could not continue to care for the girl, said Mitchell Y. Mirviss, an attorney who reviewed state records and discovered that the shelter was still in use. More recently, on Dec. 2, six siblings, ages 3 to 13 years, also stayed at the facility, a 24-hour intake center that was never designed to house children for long periods.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | June 21, 2005
WASHINGTON - "The only certainty is that nothing is certain," said the Roman scholar Pliny the Elder. With that kind of attitude, he never could have made it in today's media world. As the Terri Schiavo case illustrates, today's top commentators tend to be unalterably certain, even in the face of scientific evidence. In the view of certain sultans of certainty, for example, anyone who did not want to intrude in the family dispute over Mrs. Schiavo's feeding tube was some kind of a natural-born killer.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2005
An autopsy on Terri Schiavo found that she had massive, irreversible brain damage, a Florida medical examiner's office said yesterday in a report that gave scientific support to her husband's decision to withdraw her feeding tube. But for Schiavo's parents and others, the findings didn't end the ethical or medical debate that eventually drew in Congress and the White House. Bob and Mary Schindler still say that their daughter would not have wanted her life ended and that she was not in a persistent vegetative state, their lawyer, David Gibbs III, said.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | April 12, 2005
WASHINGTON - You're entitled to your own opinion, an old debater's saying goes, but not your own facts. Whoever made up that line never imagined the Terri Schiavo case. The death of the 41-year-old woman ended the debate over her feeding tube and pushed her story off the front page. But the arguing over when and whether her feeding tube should have been removed goes on, complete with new evidence to bolster each side's positions. Stung by major polls that showed most Americans supported removing her feeding tube, the Christian Defense Coalition, which supported keeping Mrs. Schiavo hooked up to a feeding tube, commissioned a new Zogby poll that appears to support keeping her tube engaged.
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Tracy Wilkinson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 31, 2005
ROME - Acknowledging that the pontiff's recovery has been slow, the Vatican said yesterday that Pope John Paul II is now receiving nutrition through a feeding tube in his nose to give him strength. Public audiences with the pope will be canceled until further notice, the Vatican said. It was the Vatican's first public statement on the frail pope's health in nearly three weeks, amid growing concern over his ability to continue his papal duties. The announcement came shortly after Pope John Paul appeared at his apartment window above St. Peter's Square and, for the second time in four days, failed in an attempt to speak to the crowd below.
NEWS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | October 22, 2004
A former nursing home employee was charged with two counts of neglect yesterday in connection with the death of an 89-year-old woman who was fed to death. In an indictment handed up by a Baltimore grand jury, Augustine Okafor, 48, of the 3400 block of Maryvale Road was accused of intentionally not providing necessary assistance and resources for Bertha Small, who died in November 2002. She was asphyxiated by liquid nutrients after employees at Villa St. Michael Nursing and Retirement Center left a feeding tube running overnight, until the liquid exploded from her mouth and nose, according to a civil suit filed last year by Small's family.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | April 3, 2005
WASHINGTON - The tears surprised me. I pulled over, blinded by them. The incident is sharp in memory because it was a turning point: the moment I finally accepted the unacceptable. My mom was going to lose her battle with breast cancer. She was going to die. My sisters and brother had already come to terms with it. I was the one still clinging, stubbornly and defiantly, to an expectation of miracles. To do otherwise felt like a betrayal of my mother. And of my faith. But that day back in 1988, acceptance finally forced itself on me. Cancer had made her a stick figure.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 1, 2005
PINELLAS PARK, Fla. - The Rev. Ed Martin does not want to squander the attention that the Terri Schiavo case has given his cause. In the month the anti-abortion activist spent outside the hospice housing the severely brain-damaged woman, he has given his business card - emblazoned with a logo of an adult hand protectively holding a baby - to every reporter who has approached him. In the wake of Schiavo's death, protesters like Martin are trying to...
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