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Fee Increase

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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2011
A state task force called Tuesday for tripling the "flush fee" Maryland homeowners pay as a way to help finance an accelerated cleanup of the Chesapeake Bay. The 28-member task force, appointed by Gov. Martin O'Malley to tackle sewage and growth issues, voted overwhelmingly to recommend that the $2.50 monthly bay restoration fee be doubled next year and increased to $7.50 a month by 2015. The fee is levied on water and sewer bills for utility customers, and on property tax bills for homeowners on septic systems.
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By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2013
Republican lawmakers marked Monday's hikes in fees, gas taxes and tolls in Maryland by protesting what they called a "virtual downpour" of increases that they blamed on Gov. Martin O'Malley. As a result of legislation backed by O'Malley and passed by the General Assembly this year, the state's tax on gasoline increased 3.5 cents a gallon -- the first of several phased-in increases between now and 2016. In addition, the second phase of a toll increase adopted by the Maryland Transportation Authority in 2011 went into effect Monday.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2012
An outcry of protests by some Maryland hunters upset about the substantial fee increase for yearly licenses has led to the Department of Natural Resources restructuring the proposal being considered by lawmakers. According to Paul Peditto, the DNR's director of Wildlife and Heritage Services, the increase has been scaled back in a way to make it more "family friendly" and to encourage junior hunters to get their licenses. Under the initial increase that is part of House Bill 1419, state residents would have had the cost of their annual licenses increase from $24.50, plus separate stamps for bowhunting and muzzloading privileges, to as much as $95 for a consolidated license.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2013
Maryland's in-state undergraduates will pay a few hundred dollars more per semester this fall under a new tuition-and-fee plan approved Wednesday by the university system's Board of Regents. Out-of-state students will be hit a little harder, paying as much as $1,060 more, for example, at the University of Maryland, College Park. The plan marks the fourth year that tuition for resident undergraduates at most Maryland schools has gone up 3 percent — an increase characterized by university system officials as moderate and lower than many states.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | December 15, 1992
Three Westminster food service owners hope to organize a meeting with the Carroll County Commissioners to protest the way the commissioners quietly doubled the county's annual restaurant license fees for 1993.The three owners are soliciting interest from other owners of food shops and restaurants for the proposed meeting."I just think the people affected by these changes should be made aware before the changes are made," said Robert Lowry, owner of Cockey's Tavern. He said he does not oppose the fee increase if county officials would justify it.Kay D'Eugenio, co-owner with her husband of the La Strada Italian grocery and deli, said her concerns are "the amount of the increase and us not being able to defend ourselves before" it was adopted.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2002
A proposed 50 percent increase in University of Maryland parking fees that is bitterly opposed by service and clerical workers took a big step closer to final approval yesterday. The finance committee of the university system's Board of Regents voted to recommend that the full board approve the fee increase for the College Park campus when it meets July 10. University officials say the extra money is needed to pay for new parking garages. The fee increase -- from $220 a year to $330 for faculty and staff -- would take effect Nov. 1. Fees for students who reside on campus also would be raised, from $191 to $287.
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun Reporter | February 24, 2008
Parents may soon be paying more for high school summer courses because the Harford County Board of Education is considering a fee increase. Harford County Superintendent Jacqueline C. Haas recommended a $60 increase, which would raise the full credit course fee to $510, citing a shortfall from the last summer session. Students who are trying to recover a course credit would pay a reduced fee of $335 -- or a $30 increase. About 400 of nearly 12,000 high school students attend summer school, held at the Center for Educational Opportunity in Aberdeen.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to the Sun | April 23, 2008
Impact fees on new construction in Anne Arundel County should be significantly increased, though more slowly and by less than sought by County Executive John R. Leopold, according to a new report by an independent panel. The group, formed by the County Council after it balked at Leopold's proposal, questioned the assumption of a consultant hired by his administration that the county has no further room on its roads or in its schools. It found that the county services are at 80 percent capacity.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff Marina Sarris contributed to this story | June 5, 1991
Under a plan worked out between lawmakers and the Schaefer administration to keep the state from losing federal highway funds, the General Assembly will decide at a special session later this month whether drivers should pay more for licenses, titles, tags and other services.House Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell Jr., D-Eastern Shore, the last key legislative opponent of the fee increase, agreed yesterday to support a measure that would produce $40 million in new revenues.The Maryland Department of Transportation says it needs that much in matching funds -- at least temporarily -- to secure another $312 million in federal highway money.
NEWS
November 20, 1998
RAISING IMPACT fees for home construction is a prudent and timely action by Carroll County's lame-duck commissioners. The moderate fee increases are needed, and the action may protect the new board from having to handle this political hot potato.The fee increases, the first in three years, range from 6 to 8 percent for all but mobile homes. For a single-family home, the increase will be $257, rising to $4,744 -- nowhere near enough to fulfill the dire warnings of the homebuilder industry.
NEWS
April 23, 2013
Your recent editorial on stormwater fees made me burst out laughing with tears streaming from my eyes - hopefully, liquid that will not one day to be considered taxable run-off ("The rain tax sham," April 18). You opine that "we think it's far more sensible to expect polluters to clean up after themselves - and in this case, that means all of us. " In response to that statement, I couldn't help but think of the Sunday morning televangelist shouting at us "repent, you nasty polluters, repent!"
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2012
The Orioles and Nationals are awaiting a decision on how much more money Washington will receive in annual rights fees from the Mid-Atlantic Sports Network, which televises both teams' games. The decision from a Major League Baseball committee could come as soon as the next few weeks, according to an official familiar with the process. The Nationals receive at least $29 million per year from MASN, said the official, who declined to be identified while the decision is pending. The team is seeking a rights fee increase based on the current state of the market.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2012
The Maryland Department of Natural Resources is suggesting lesser increases in boat registration than was proposed last month in the General Assembly. Under the department's amendment, registration every two years would cost: $25 for boats under 16 feet; $50 for boats under 21 feet; $75 for boats under 32 feet; $100 for boats under 45 feet; $200 for boats up to 65 feet; and $300 for boats more than 65 feet long. The new fee levels would start in 2013. Boat registration, regardless of vessel size, currently costs $24 every two years.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2012
An outcry of protests by some Maryland hunters upset about the substantial fee increase for yearly licenses has led to the Department of Natural Resources restructuring the proposal being considered by lawmakers. According to Paul Peditto, the DNR's director of Wildlife and Heritage Services, the increase has been scaled back in a way to make it more "family friendly" and to encourage junior hunters to get their licenses. Under the initial increase that is part of House Bill 1419, state residents would have had the cost of their annual licenses increase from $24.50, plus separate stamps for bowhunting and muzzloading privileges, to as much as $95 for a consolidated license.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2012
If you hold a gathering of more than 50 boats in Maryland waters after June 1, you can expect to pay a "marine gathering permit fee" — the amount yet to be determined — under legislation proposed by the O'Malley administration. Need a certified copy of a marriage certificate? The cost would double from $12 to $24 under an administration proposal. Own a commercial scale with a capacity of more than a ton? The fee for registering it would increase from $75 to $100 under a bill submitted by the state Department of Agriculture.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2012
A state proposal to raise boat registration fees for the first time in nearly three decades has dismayed many boat owners. A bill filed Thursday morning in Annapolis would replace the flat $24 boat registration fee paid every two years with fees ranging from $50 to $700, depending on the size of the boat. The increases would be phased in over four years, beginning in October, for Maryland's 191,000 registered boat owners. "What's the benefit? Or is it just one more way to raise revenue for the state?
NEWS
January 22, 2001
THINK OF IT as an insurance policy. The extra $8 you pay on your vehicle registration buys one of the nation's best statewide emergency medical systems in case you, a loved one or a friend is badly injured in an accident. That insurance policy, though, is about to lapse. The money raised from this surcharge on Maryland cars and trucks - about $36 million -isn't enough any longer to support a comprehensive emergency medical services network. Unless the General Assembly finds additional funds, there will be a 15-percent cutback in the statewide EMS system, which includes everything from MedEvac helicopters, paramedics, fire and rescue equipment and the renowned Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2001
The basic cost of a new home in Anne Arundel County could increase if County Council members vote to bump up fees paid by homebuilders. After a year of study and intense debate, County Executive Janet S. Owens said yesterday that she would introduce legislation to increase development impact fees by 50 percent at a council meeting Nov. 19. The proposed increase in impact fees, recommended to Owens by a panel of builders, residents and business owners,...
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2012
In the past few months, life has gotten a lot busier for Anne Arundel County Councilman Derek Fink. As he was tasked with considering dozens of land rezoning applications in his Pasadena district, the Republican legislator opened a new restaurant, where he logs long hours as the general manger. As he approached his second year on the council, his colleagues selected him to serve as chairman. And come the end of March, he'll be a first-time dad. He and his wife, Kristin, are expecting a boy on March 26. "I'm used to the long hours and will continue to do that," said Fink, who at 30 is the youngest member of the council.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2012
With the Chesapeake Bay cleanup at a critical juncture, Gov. Martin O'Malley is calling on Marylanders to double down on their contribution to the effort, proposing to raise the "flush fee" every household pays from $2.50 to $5 a month, on average. Without the increase, administration officials warn, they face a $385 million shortfall starting this year in the funds needed to upgrade pollution controls at the state's biggest sewage treatment plants — most notably Baltimore's century-old Back River facility, the largest in Maryland.
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