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Federico Fellini

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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 23, 1998
The hooker with a heart of gold is such a cliche by now that it's easy to forget someone once made it look new."Nights of Cabiria," the 1957 drama by Federico Fellini that is being shown at the Charles with refurbished sound and image, is a slender film that Fellini's critics have called both his nadir and his masterpiece. For now, leave that argument to the rumpled, whey-faced lot who thrive on such debates.Aficionados will be interested to see a sequence involving a charitable stranger (the Man With the Sack)
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By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2010
Cinematic Adaptations At Creative Alliance Certain pop movies can lodge in your brain like an energizing jingle, and for many of us, one of them is "Stripes," a good-natured, deliriously funny military comedy. This Bill Murray vehicle about post-counterculture slackers joining the Army and getting into fighting trim has been dismissed by the likes of Leonard Maltin as "predictable" and "eminently forgettable." But the movie enlisted millions of Murray fans (including me), who still laugh uncontrollably when they hear the phrase, "That's the fact, Jack!"
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By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2010
Cinematic Adaptations At Creative Alliance Certain pop movies can lodge in your brain like an energizing jingle, and for many of us, one of them is "Stripes," a good-natured, deliriously funny military comedy. This Bill Murray vehicle about post-counterculture slackers joining the Army and getting into fighting trim has been dismissed by the likes of Leonard Maltin as "predictable" and "eminently forgettable." But the movie enlisted millions of Murray fans (including me), who still laugh uncontrollably when they hear the phrase, "That's the fact, Jack!"
ENTERTAINMENT
By SUSAN KING and SUSAN KING,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 1, 2006
The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language describes a Casanova as a "man who is amorously and gallantly attentive to women" and as a "promiscuous man; a philanderer." Both definitions are based on the overheated life of Giovanni Jacopo Casanova de Seingalt, an Italian adventurer who lived 1725-98 and vividly wrote about his conquests of women. Given the subject matter, it's no surprise that Casanova and various womanizers have long been a popular subject in literature, plays and films.
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By SUSAN KING and SUSAN KING,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 1, 2006
The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language describes a Casanova as a "man who is amorously and gallantly attentive to women" and as a "promiscuous man; a philanderer." Both definitions are based on the overheated life of Giovanni Jacopo Casanova de Seingalt, an Italian adventurer who lived 1725-98 and vividly wrote about his conquests of women. Given the subject matter, it's no surprise that Casanova and various womanizers have long been a popular subject in literature, plays and films.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | March 30, 1993
Richard Gere talking Tibetan politics, Tim Robbins and Susan Sarandon analyzing U.S. immigration policy, Geena Davis wearing a dress only she could wear plus wooden tributes and lots of kitsch.The telecast of the 65th annual Academy Awards last night was very, well, Hollywood in its stranger and flakier moments. But, more than anything else, it was a surprisingly flat TV show.Maybe it was just that expectations were so high after Jack Palance's one-armed pushups and Billy Crystal's brilliant running commentary on Palance and the pushups last year.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 27, 2002
The interlocking love stories in director Ernst Lubitsch's 1934 Trouble in Paradise, the latest entry in the Charles Theatre's Saturday revival series, soar on gossamer wings, thanks to the dashing, delicate wordplay of screenwriter Samson Raphaelson. In the film's first dialogue scene, Herbert Marshall asks a hotel waiter, "If Casanova suddenly ... turned out to be Romeo ... having supper with Juliet - who might become Cleopatra ... how would you start?" In what Raphaelson's script characterizes as "a professional and prosaic tone," the waiter replies, "I would start with cocktails."
NEWS
November 3, 1993
Italian director Federico Fellini once told an interviewer, "When I am not making movies, I feel I am not alive." For Mr. Fellini, who died this week at age 73, filmmaking was the center of his life and a vocation through which he defined himself as one of the most original artists of the 20th century.To American audiences of the 1960s and '70s, Mr. Fellini's works were the quintessential "foreign films," complex psychological studies that documented the ambiguity of the human condition and straddled the line between the real and the surreal.
NEWS
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 1, 1993
Federico Fellini, the great Italian film director, was so unique an artist that his death yesterday should have been likewise unique. But it wasn't.Instead, the 73-year-old man passed quietly in a coma after suffering a heart attack a month ago and going on a life-support system in a Rome hospital.It was an ironically commonplace end for a man who, loved or loathed, lionized or ignored over his long career, was never commonplace.In fact, so unique was Fellini's vision and accomplishment as a film director that no existing word could quite describe it; one had to be invented.
FEATURES
April 10, 2007
Musical , Molly Ringwald in `Sweet Charity' Go see Molly Ringwald in Sweet Charity, based on Federico Fellini's 1957 movie Nights of Cabiria. The musical at the Hippodrome, 12 N. Eutaw St., starts at 8 tonight. Tickets for the show are $27-$72. Call 410-547-SEAT or go to broad wayacrossamerica.com. FYI Susan Reimer is on vacation. Her column returns next week.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 27, 2002
The interlocking love stories in director Ernst Lubitsch's 1934 Trouble in Paradise, the latest entry in the Charles Theatre's Saturday revival series, soar on gossamer wings, thanks to the dashing, delicate wordplay of screenwriter Samson Raphaelson. In the film's first dialogue scene, Herbert Marshall asks a hotel waiter, "If Casanova suddenly ... turned out to be Romeo ... having supper with Juliet - who might become Cleopatra ... how would you start?" In what Raphaelson's script characterizes as "a professional and prosaic tone," the waiter replies, "I would start with cocktails."
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 23, 1998
The hooker with a heart of gold is such a cliche by now that it's easy to forget someone once made it look new."Nights of Cabiria," the 1957 drama by Federico Fellini that is being shown at the Charles with refurbished sound and image, is a slender film that Fellini's critics have called both his nadir and his masterpiece. For now, leave that argument to the rumpled, whey-faced lot who thrive on such debates.Aficionados will be interested to see a sequence involving a charitable stranger (the Man With the Sack)
NEWS
November 3, 1993
Italian director Federico Fellini once told an interviewer, "When I am not making movies, I feel I am not alive." For Mr. Fellini, who died this week at age 73, filmmaking was the center of his life and a vocation through which he defined himself as one of the most original artists of the 20th century.To American audiences of the 1960s and '70s, Mr. Fellini's works were the quintessential "foreign films," complex psychological studies that documented the ambiguity of the human condition and straddled the line between the real and the surreal.
NEWS
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 1, 1993
Federico Fellini, the great Italian film director, was so unique an artist that his death yesterday should have been likewise unique. But it wasn't.Instead, the 73-year-old man passed quietly in a coma after suffering a heart attack a month ago and going on a life-support system in a Rome hospital.It was an ironically commonplace end for a man who, loved or loathed, lionized or ignored over his long career, was never commonplace.In fact, so unique was Fellini's vision and accomplishment as a film director that no existing word could quite describe it; one had to be invented.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | March 30, 1993
Richard Gere talking Tibetan politics, Tim Robbins and Susan Sarandon analyzing U.S. immigration policy, Geena Davis wearing a dress only she could wear plus wooden tributes and lots of kitsch.The telecast of the 65th annual Academy Awards last night was very, well, Hollywood in its stranger and flakier moments. But, more than anything else, it was a surprisingly flat TV show.Maybe it was just that expectations were so high after Jack Palance's one-armed pushups and Billy Crystal's brilliant running commentary on Palance and the pushups last year.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | April 12, 2007
Molly Ringwald's Sweet Charity is definitely sweet. She's also cute and spunky and innocent. But though the actress -- still best known for the John Hughes' teen movies Sixteen Candles, The Breakfast Club and Pretty in Pink -- plays a dance hall hostess, she's not one of the slickest dancers in the touring production at the Hippodrome Theatre. Neil Simon's script does give Ringwald an out. "Who dances? We defend ourselves to music," one of Charity's co-workers explains to a newcomer. "Innocent" might also sound like a stretch for the taxi dancers at the sleazy Fandango Ballroom.
NEWS
January 22, 1998
Zevulun Hammer, 62, an education minister who was a founder of the Jewish settlement movement in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, died Tuesday in Jerusalem of cancer.Ahmed Kafadar, 82, who turned a knowledge of ballistics and explosives into one of the world's largest air-bag component companies, died of a heart attack Saturday in Englewood, Colo. He was chairman of OEA Inc., which produces small pyrotechnic devices that trigger inflation of air bags.David "Junior" Kimbrough, 67, a country blues guitarist whose raunchy, hypnotic style garnered a cult following, died of a heart attack Saturday in Holly Springs, Miss.
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