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NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | July 25, 1992
A federal judge yesterday gave the National Treasury Employees Union (NTEU) permission to distribute leaflets at the Social Security Administration complex in Woodlawn.The decision in U.S. District Court in Washington clears the way for the NTEU to resume its quest to bring 8,000 employees at the complex -- and 55,000 workers nationwide -- under its aegis."This ruling means we will have access to the sidewalk at Woodlawn, and we will use them," said Susan N. Holliday, a spokeswoman for the Washington-based union.
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NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2005
The Bush administration unveiled new regulations yesterday for thousands of Pentagon workers that it said would promote higher performance - but union leaders decried them as the first step toward diminished rights for the government's entire work force. Under the proposed rules, raises would be based on annual performance evaluations from managers rather than seniority, and workers could face greater competition from outside applicants for promotions. Union leaders fear the employees would be more susceptible to managers' favoritism and have weaker procedures to protest demotions or firings.
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NEWS
April 13, 2003
M. Jane Davis, a former manager in the X-ray department at the Veterans Administration Hospital in Northeast Baltimore who was active in the local chapter of the American Federation of Government Employees, died of respiratory failure Tuesday at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. She was 83. Born in Pittsburgh, Mary Jane Morris was raised in Connellsville, Pa. After graduation from Connellsville High School, she moved to Baltimore in 1942 where she attended Morgan State College. She briefly taught at Carver Vocational Technical High School before going to work as a secretary for the Social Security Administration, then located in the Candler Building on the waterfront in downtown Baltimore.
NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2003
Rejecting an appeal by Naval Academy workers, the Navy is moving forward with plans to privatize the military college's maintenance jobs. The Navy announced this week that it had awarded a contract worth up to $55.4 million over five years to Academy Facility Management, a joint venture of Del-Jen Inc. and Consolidated Engineering Services. The contractor's bid was $5.8 million lower than one submitted under a reorganization plan drafted by academy workers fighting for their jobs. The roughly 225 electricians, plumbers and other public works employees have until December to find new work or take other federal jobs, possibly in other states.
NEWS
By Carol Emert and Carol Emert,States News Service | June 24, 1992
U.S. renews court battle over speech incomeWASHINGTON -- The Justice Department is continuing its legal battle to prevent federal workers from earning income from outside speaking and writing engagements.Federal workers thought victory was at hand in March when U.S. District Court Judge Robert Penfield Jackson ruled that the congressionally mandated ban on honorariums violates First Amendment rights to free speech.But Judge Jackson left the ban in effect for a 90-day period, during which the Justice Department could appeal the case.
NEWS
By Eliza Newlin and Eliza Newlin,States News Service | February 11, 1991
WASHINGTON -- When federal worker and sometime fisherman Bob Spore, of Pasadena, learned that it would soon be illegal for him to earn money for writing or speaking about his hobby, he was livid."
NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2003
Rejecting an appeal by Naval Academy workers, the Navy is moving forward with plans to privatize the military college's maintenance jobs. The Navy announced this week that it had awarded a contract worth up to $55.4 million over five years to Academy Facility Management, a joint venture of Del-Jen Inc. and Consolidated Engineering Services. The contractor's bid was $5.8 million lower than one submitted under a reorganization plan drafted by academy workers fighting for their jobs. The roughly 225 electricians, plumbers and other public works employees have until December to find new work or take other federal jobs, possibly in other states.
NEWS
By Carol Emert and Carol Emert,States News Service | April 8, 1992
Random drug tests of drivers ruled outWASHINGTON -- Government employees have won another drug-testing victory with a federal judge declaring that random testing for Department of Health and Human Services drivers is "unreasonable and hence unconstitutional."Advocates of federal workers say this is just the latest round in the battle against a 1986 executive order that instituted a program of mandatory random drug testing of government employees.Since then, the American Federation of Government Employees, the National Treasury Employees Union and the American Civil Liberties Union have engaged in a number of court challenges to narrow the scope of the testing.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 23, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The chairman of the House panel that oversees the Social Security Administration contends that its employees have been inappropriately performing work for their unions during regular work hours.While contracts with federal employees allow them to carry out some union duties on "official time," Rep. Jim Bunning charges that the problem is out of control, costing taxpayers $14.7 million in salary and expenses a year. The Kentucky Republican began three days of hearings on the issue yesterday; they are scheduled to conclude tomorrow.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 20, 2000
WASHINGTON - Within two years, 13 million federal workers, retirees and military personnel will be able to purchase long-term care insurance at group rates under a measure signed into law yesterday by President Clinton. Like many private employers who offer such insurance, the federal government will not subsidize the premiums for long-term care policies. But advocates of the bill, which include a cross-section of lawmakers from both parties as well as the administration, said the law would make it easier for federal employees to prepare for their long-term health needs and encourage more private employers to make such group policies available.
NEWS
April 13, 2003
M. Jane Davis, a former manager in the X-ray department at the Veterans Administration Hospital in Northeast Baltimore who was active in the local chapter of the American Federation of Government Employees, died of respiratory failure Tuesday at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. She was 83. Born in Pittsburgh, Mary Jane Morris was raised in Connellsville, Pa. After graduation from Connellsville High School, she moved to Baltimore in 1942 where she attended Morgan State College. She briefly taught at Carver Vocational Technical High School before going to work as a secretary for the Social Security Administration, then located in the Candler Building on the waterfront in downtown Baltimore.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 20, 2000
WASHINGTON - Within two years, 13 million federal workers, retirees and military personnel will be able to purchase long-term care insurance at group rates under a measure signed into law yesterday by President Clinton. Like many private employers who offer such insurance, the federal government will not subsidize the premiums for long-term care policies. But advocates of the bill, which include a cross-section of lawmakers from both parties as well as the administration, said the law would make it easier for federal employees to prepare for their long-term health needs and encourage more private employers to make such group policies available.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 23, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The chairman of the House panel that oversees the Social Security Administration contends that its employees have been inappropriately performing work for their unions during regular work hours.While contracts with federal employees allow them to carry out some union duties on "official time," Rep. Jim Bunning charges that the problem is out of control, costing taxpayers $14.7 million in salary and expenses a year. The Kentucky Republican began three days of hearings on the issue yesterday; they are scheduled to conclude tomorrow.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 17, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Saying it would cost too much at a time of government downsizing, President Clinton vetoed a measure yesterday that would have permitted more than 1 million longtime federal employees to seek more lucrative retirement benefits.The provision would have allowed federal employees enrolled in a conventional pension plan to shift into a newer system similar to a 401(k) program, in which the government contributes to employees' investments in stocks and bonds.The president said his veto of the measure would save taxpayers $854 million over five years.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,States News Service | August 10, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Thousands of federal workers will gather in Chicago next week for a convention held by the nation's largest government employee union.At the weeklong event, the American Federation of Government Employees (AFGE) will elect officers, vote on dues, draft legislative goals and talk political strategy for the future. Nearly 1,500 delegates are expected to participate in the event, which is held every three years."The discussion topics will run the gamut," said AFGE spokeswoman Diane Witiak.
NEWS
By Ned Martel and Ned Martel,States News Service | October 20, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Eager to avoid paralyzing labor disputes, federal employee union leaders touted their first "new partnership" with at least one agency's top brass.The General Services Administration and the three largest federal employee unions signed a resolution yesterday to begin regular dialogues with representatives of labor and agency managers.GSA Administrator Roger Johnson, who left the private sector in July to join the government, told the labor leaders that the federal workplace needs to imitate the corporate environment.
NEWS
By Kate McKenna and Kate McKenna,States News Service | December 11, 1991
Drug-testing deal reachedThe Defense Contract Audit Agency and the American Federation of Government Employees have reached an agreement that modifies portions of the agency's drug-testing plan.The audit agency's post-accident and reasonable suspicion drug-testing programs in the plan were revised as a result of negotiations last week with the union, which represents 700,000 government workers in the United States and overseas. The programs would be initiated only when damages of $10,000 or more have occurred and/or physical harm has resulted from an accident.
BUSINESS
By Penny Bender and Penny Bender,States News Service | November 1, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Calling debt-ridden federal workers "deadbeats," Rep. Andrew Jacobs Jr., D-Ind., urged support for a bill he has been proposing for 14 years: a measure to allow courts to garnishee the wages of government employees who haven't paid their bills.Since 1977, Jacobs said, he has been the "lone voice" complaining about sovereign immunity, the doctrine that protects federal workers from lawsuits. Now he's taking advantage of all the furor over recent controversies in Congress over bad-check writing and questionable perks.
NEWS
By Ned Martel and Ned Martel,States News Service | August 11, 1993
WASHINGTON -- In trying to convince the Clinton administration that contracting out work to the private sector saps dollars from government coffers, federal employee unions are touting their members as a cheap source of labor.The unions are casting the federal work force as a more cost-effective alternative than some contractors by pointing to a history of cost overruns and by claiming that the expertise of veteran federal employees has a significant dollar value that contract workers cannot match.
NEWS
By Carol Emert and Carol Emert,States News Service | April 14, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Federal employee unions are urging they be given a voice in the Clinton administration's plan to reinvent government.Vice President Al Gore, who is directing the six-month National Performance Review to identify waste and inefficiency in the federal bureaucracy, has asked civil servants for tips on improving the way the government works.And federal workers have responded to the request with piles of letters and hundreds of telephone calls.Mr. Gore also is conducting a series of "town hall" meetings in government workplaces around the country to hear employees' thoughts and complaints.
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