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NEWS
October 23, 1995
The Broadneck Federation will sponsor a forum tomorrow on casino gambling in Maryland at Broadneck library, 1275 Green Holly Drive.Gerald Evans of Harvey's International will discuss the benefits of casino gambling, and Bernard Horn of Maryland NOcasiNOs will talk about the disadvantages. The federation will take a straw poll at the end.The federation's business meeting will be at 7 p.m. The forum will be at 7:30 p.m.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mark Puente and Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
Although Baltimore's mayor and police commissioner have asked the U.S. Department of Justice to review allegations of brutality in the Police Department, some civic leaders called Thursday for a more far-reaching — and hard-hitting — federal investigation. Tessa Hill-Aston, president of the NAACP's Baltimore branch, said the police force needs more than the "collaborative review" that city and federal leaders have agreed upon. If city leaders care about improving the department's relationship with residents, the probe "should be a civil rights investigation," she said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | August 29, 1999
Mission: To preserve and promote the rich culture and heritage of Hispanic nations. To participate in and contribute to social, governmental and educational programs. And to be of service to people of Hispanic origin by assisting with education, employment, health, housing and immigration. The federation, an umbrella for 10 Hispanic organizations, was founded in 1977 and is run by volunteers.Latest accomplishments: Sponsorship of the annual Hispanic Festival and Latino Congress. Assistance with a Resource Development Workshop for Hispanic/Latino nonprofit organizations; a workshop for Hispanic/Latino businesses to access more contracts with local and state governments; and an education and employment fair.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
Ann and Dominic Wiker loved life in their Federal Hill home. As a professional couple in their 30s, the neighborhood was ideal - they could walk to most attractions, shops and restaurants. It seemed there was always something fun going on outside their door. Then parenthood happened, and with it came the idea of moving to the suburbs. They would move, but they wouldn't leave Federal Hill. Nine years later, the Wikers - mom, dad, 9-year old Alex and 7-year old Tommy - have, to their delight, become a poster family for raising children in an urban environment.
NEWS
By Robert Lee and Robert Lee,Staff writer | February 21, 1991
In between jabs at the "incestuous" nature of the Greater Severna Park Council and "old-line" Severna Park, the founding members of the Millersville-Severn Run Federation established some goals and ideals for themselves at their first meeting Tuesday night.The unincorporated federation is made up of three civic associations north of Benfield Road and west of Jumpers Hole Road, which discovered common political ground in their opposition to the proposed East-West Boulevard during the past year.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1995
Organizers of the fourth annual Miss Hispanidad pageant -- a showcase for the Baltimore area's growing Hispanic community -- say they are investigating whether this year's title was awarded to the wrong woman.Since its inception in 1992, the contest has been put on by leaders of the 18-year-old Federation of Hispanic Organizations of Maryland and has become a featured part of the annual Hispanic festival.At this year's festival, held in August in Hopkins Plaza, Howard Community College student Maria Milagros Lagares was named the winner, and later received a diamond pendant and a $1,000 scholarship from the National Council of Hispanic Women.
NEWS
By Robert Lee and Robert Lee,Staff writer | May 23, 1991
The Millersville/Severn Run Federation is attempting to shed its combative image as the "anti-East-West Boulevard organization" and move ahead to broader issues affecting the central Interstate 97 corridor.At its second official monthly meeting Tuesday, the seven-community council's interim president, George Cumberledge, repeatedly insisted that "this is not a one-issue organization," complaining that "thepress" has unfairly characterized the federation as such in the past.But with key committee posts still vacant, no other active issueson the table, and a two-month summer break coming up in July, it maybe a while before the group develops an idea of what it does stand for now that it has decided to downplay East-West Boulevard.
NEWS
By DAN FESPERMAN and DAN FESPERMAN,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 24, 1995
BERLIN -- As Croatian and Muslim armies recently advanced across western Bosnia toward yet another Serbian-held village, continuing the Bosnian war's breathtaking reversal of fortunes, a dark thought occurred to a few United Nations observers: What if, after taking their next objective, the allies turn their guns on each other?It hasn't happened, but the thought illustrated an important point: The Croat-Muslim Federation, virtually taken for granted in discussions of Bosnia's future, is anything but secure or certain in the minds of its two partners.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | October 31, 1995
Roman Catholic Church leaders are launching a drive today to get more tax money for the state's parochial schools. The newly formed Maryland Federation of Catholic School Parents, part of a nationwide effort by Catholic school advocates say the money wouldn't cross the line between church and state because these services do not advance religion, and go directly to students, not to schools.However, opponents immediately said the aid would undermine public schools.Private schools receive federal money for low-income families, such as free and reduced-price lunches and materials and aides through Chapter 1, a program for educationally disadvantaged children.
NEWS
By Christopher Kirkpatrick and Christopher Kirkpatrick,Capital News Service | March 4, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Republican Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett has voted consistently for small-business interests, unlike Democratic Reps. Benjamin L. Cardin and Kweisi Mfume, according to a recent report by the the National Federation of Independent Business.The report rated Congress members on key votes cast during 1993 and early 1994.Eight votes were studied for House members; 13 for senators.Among the issues surveyed last week by the group -- the largest small-business federation in the country -- were family and medical leave, tax increases and deficit reduction, and property rights.
NEWS
Luke Broadwater, Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
A U.S. Department of Justice official promised Wednesday that his agency's months-long investigation of police brutality in Baltimore would be a "candid" assessment, and federal lawmakers threw their support behind the probe. Ronald L. Davis, director of the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, said he met with Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts in Arkansas on Wednesday at a U.S. Conference of Mayors event focused on police misconduct.
NEWS
By Charles Cadwell and Mark Goldberg | October 6, 2014
Climate change has been in the news a lot lately. The United Nations held a Climate Change Summit, which was attended by more than 100 heads of state. Hundreds of thousands of people took to the streets of New York for a "People's Climate March," the biggest such event ever. But there was a third very important climate-related development that received much less attention than it warranted: President Barack Obama issued a new executive order that may prove to be a turning point for efforts to advance climate preparedness around the world and for U.S. foreign aid planning.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
To his friends and supporters, Eric T. Costello is just what the City Council needs: a smart, hard-working community president with financial experience that could save taxpayers money. To his critics, however, Costello is just what Baltimore doesn't need: an ambitious, sometimes volatile leader more interested in pleasing the powerful than his neighborhood's residents. Costello, 33, a New York native, has been a magnet for controversy during his relatively short tenure in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Mark Puente and Justin Fenton and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
As Baltimore Police Department officials prepare for a Department of Justice probe into allegations of brutality, leaders of the local police union criticized the outside scrutiny and said it could make city streets less safe. A host of reforms, along with a strategic plan unveiled last year, shows the department is serious about improving its relationship with the community, Fraternal Order of Police President Robert Cherry said Monday. The new federal scrutinty could make city officers fearful of being second-guessed and lead to ineffective policing, he added.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 4, 2014
That's a wise move by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Police Commissioner Tony Batts, asking the feds to open a civil rights investigation into police brutality and how cases are handled here. But I have a question: She took office in February 2010; didn't the mayor recognize a troubling trend in settlements and court judgments before she read about them in this newspaper? It's a tough job, running the city; it's hard to keep track of everything. But, as a member of the Board of Estimates since 2007 - first as City Council president, then as mayor - didn't Rawlings-Blake notice damages going to victims of beatings and other appalling police actions?
NEWS
By Mark Puente and Doug Donovan and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
The U.S. Department of Justice is investigating allegations of brutality and misconduct at Baltimore's Police Department, the type of probe that has triggered wide-ranging reforms in other cities. Here's a look at federal investigations in five other jurisdictions: • Pittsburgh — Police officers were accused of making false arrests of people who challenged their authority and of using excessive force against criminal suspects, including individuals wearing handcuffs. The department was also accused of failing to discipline officers for such actions.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | October 2, 2005
The U.S. Education Department's inspector general is investigating whether a senior official of the agency improperly helped the National Federation of the Blind win a key federal grant around the time she was discussing taking a job at the Baltimore-based nonprofit. Joanne M. Wilson resigned as commissioner of the Rehabilitative Services Administration in March and went to work for the federation soon afterward. Wilson, who is blind, ran a federation affiliate in Louisiana before joining the Bush administration, and that affiliate is helping administer the grant.
BUSINESS
By Graeme Browning | September 11, 1990
If a Washington-based coalition of 23 environmental agencies has its way, the phrase "I gave at the office" will soon take on a whole new meaning.Earlier this month, the Environmental Federation of America, composed of such august groups as the Wilderness Society, the American Forestry Association and the Friends of the Earth, began a campaign to persuade businesses to offer the federation as an alternative to the United Way in their annual officewide charity...
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
Late last year, medical device maker Zimmer Holdings Inc. made two large payments to Dr. Andrew N. Pollak, chair of the University of Maryland Medical System's orthopedics department. The payments, one for $47,225 and the other for $45,902, were royalties paid to Pollak for work he did at Maryland Shock Trauma Center starting seven years ago in helping develop a clamp known as a fixator that could hold trauma patient's broken bones straight until they were ready for surgical repair.
NEWS
By John Fritze and Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake won praise from clergy and community leaders Friday after calling for a federal investigation into allegations of police brutality - a move that is all but certain to draw added scrutiny on City Hall. But careful observers noted the request from Rawlings-Blake and Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts came hours after another official - City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young - raised his hand to invite the U.S. Department of Justice in for a closer look.
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