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By Young Chang and Young Chang,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 16, 1999
U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia spoke to high school students at the Park School yesterday about the Constitution, telling them they should read the "Federalist Papers" for a better understanding of the document.Scalia said the essays, written between 1787 and 1788 by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison and John Jay, would serve the students better than "listening to me."About 300 students from the upper school heard the conservative justice speak at Park's Meyerhoff Theater. Many raised their hands afterward, and a few were called on to speak.
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | December 28, 2008
You may not be as anonymous online as you think. Maryland's highest court will soon decide how easy it is to unmask those who use pseudonyms to post critical comments on the Internet. So far, the state has been operating without a set of rules for identifying those people, but the issue has surfaced over criticism of an Eastern Shore developer. The issue of Internet anonymity has cropped up in other courts around the country, but this is the first time that Maryland's Court of Appeals has confronted it. This month, the judges heard arguments that invoked the right to anonymous free speech and the right of defamed people to sue their attackers.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 14, 1998
A document dealing with such matters as furtive White House meetings and a dress from the Gap was the most talked-about publication in America this weekend.But another, more venerable, volume was getting substantial attention: The Federalist Papers, the collection of articles published by Alexander Hamilton, John Jay and James Madison in 1787 and 1788 to make their case for the adoption of the Constitution.The Federalist articles, in addition to their many other contributions, amplified the bare description in the Constitution that the president, vice president and other officials could be "removed from office on impeachment for, and conviction of, treason, bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors."
NEWS
January 20, 2008
Notes Liberty's blueprint: Last week, when presidential candidate Mike Huckabee suggested that the U.S. Constitution might be amended to better comport with God's law, there was widespread shocked reaction. Americans take their Constitution seriously, even as they argue endlessly about what it means and how it might be amended. Now comes Michael I. Meyerson, a University of Baltimore law professor, with a new book that promises significant help for those of us confused about the intent of the Founding Fathers when they drafted the constitution.
FEATURES
October 27, 2005
Oct. 27--1787: The first of the Federalist Papers, calling for ratification of the United States Constitution, was published. 1938: Du Pont announced a name for its new synthetic yarn: "nylon." 1947: "You Bet Your Life," starring Groucho Marx, premiered on ABC Radio.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 13, 1994
WASHINGTON -- "Publius" appeared to gain some modern friends on the Supreme Court yesterday, and that could mean trouble for laws in Maryland and other states that limit or ban anonymous political writings.A figure out of America's political beginnings, the political propagandist "Publius" apparently would be a law-breaker in Ohio if he were still writing under that pen name today, the justices were told.Responding to anonymous newspaper stories attacking the government that would be formed under the new U.S. Constitution, three of America's early leaders -- Alexander Hamilton, James Madison and John Jay -- wrote 85 essays -- the "Federalist Papers" -- to promote ratification of the Constitution.
NEWS
January 20, 2008
Notes Liberty's blueprint: Last week, when presidential candidate Mike Huckabee suggested that the U.S. Constitution might be amended to better comport with God's law, there was widespread shocked reaction. Americans take their Constitution seriously, even as they argue endlessly about what it means and how it might be amended. Now comes Michael I. Meyerson, a University of Baltimore law professor, with a new book that promises significant help for those of us confused about the intent of the Founding Fathers when they drafted the constitution.
NEWS
By Carlos Fuentes | December 13, 1990
Carlos Fuentes is a Mexican novelist who was awarded the Cervantes Prize for Spanish Literature in 1988. He has just completed a documentary for BBC on the historical relationship between Spain and Latin America. WHEN THE European Conference on Security and Cooperation convened in Paris last month, German Chancellor Helmut Kohl warned against "retrograde nationalisms" that could disrupt the building of the "common house" of Europe. He was calling attention to one of the many paradoxes that stud, like sequins, the debutante's gown of the New World Order as it struggles to fashion itself amid the ruins of the Cold War.This gown could become the shirt of Nessus, which tears away the skin that wears it, unless forms of conciliation are found between the worldwide movement toward interdependence and the multiple nationalist tendencies that are now rising to contradict it. Nowhere is this truer than in the Soviet Union.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | December 28, 2008
You may not be as anonymous online as you think. Maryland's highest court will soon decide how easy it is to unmask those who use pseudonyms to post critical comments on the Internet. So far, the state has been operating without a set of rules for identifying those people, but the issue has surfaced over criticism of an Eastern Shore developer. The issue of Internet anonymity has cropped up in other courts around the country, but this is the first time that Maryland's Court of Appeals has confronted it. This month, the judges heard arguments that invoked the right to anonymous free speech and the right of defamed people to sue their attackers.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2000
They arrived in luxury cars or beat-up sedans, wore blue jeans or dresses, toted children or spouses and streamed into the school cafeteria to pay homage to democracy, right there in front of the ice cream freezer. "It's everybody's duty to vote," said Peggy Sue Conrad, as she left New Windsor Middle School in Carroll County and strolled into the sunshine. "You don't vote, then I don't want to hear you complaining." The particulars of the venue varied -- a firetruck or a set of bleachers took the place of the freezer at other polling stations -- but residents of every city, town and rural district in Maryland performed the same ritual yesterday.
FEATURES
October 27, 2005
Oct. 27--1787: The first of the Federalist Papers, calling for ratification of the United States Constitution, was published. 1938: Du Pont announced a name for its new synthetic yarn: "nylon." 1947: "You Bet Your Life," starring Groucho Marx, premiered on ABC Radio.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2000
They arrived in luxury cars or beat-up sedans, wore blue jeans or dresses, toted children or spouses and streamed into the school cafeteria to pay homage to democracy, right there in front of the ice cream freezer. "It's everybody's duty to vote," said Peggy Sue Conrad, as she left New Windsor Middle School in Carroll County and strolled into the sunshine. "You don't vote, then I don't want to hear you complaining." The particulars of the venue varied -- a firetruck or a set of bleachers took the place of the freezer at other polling stations -- but residents of every city, town and rural district in Maryland performed the same ritual yesterday.
NEWS
By Young Chang and Young Chang,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 16, 1999
U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia spoke to high school students at the Park School yesterday about the Constitution, telling them they should read the "Federalist Papers" for a better understanding of the document.Scalia said the essays, written between 1787 and 1788 by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison and John Jay, would serve the students better than "listening to me."About 300 students from the upper school heard the conservative justice speak at Park's Meyerhoff Theater. Many raised their hands afterward, and a few were called on to speak.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 14, 1998
A document dealing with such matters as furtive White House meetings and a dress from the Gap was the most talked-about publication in America this weekend.But another, more venerable, volume was getting substantial attention: The Federalist Papers, the collection of articles published by Alexander Hamilton, John Jay and James Madison in 1787 and 1788 to make their case for the adoption of the Constitution.The Federalist articles, in addition to their many other contributions, amplified the bare description in the Constitution that the president, vice president and other officials could be "removed from office on impeachment for, and conviction of, treason, bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors."
NEWS
By George F. Will | August 23, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Rahm Emanuel is one of those windup dolls the president has been sending forth for seven months to deny the obvious. ("Did he have sex? No. Sexual relations? No.") But Emanuel is magnanimous: "I'm not owed an apology."Earth to Emanuel: What about the apology you owe the public, on whose payroll you have been while insulting the public's intelligence?Compassion being the defining virtue of an age dubious about all other virtues, Mr. Emanuel is presented as a victim, of Bill Clinton, just as Mr. Clinton presents himself as a victim (of Ken Starr and others disrespectful of Mr. Clinton's family values)
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 13, 1994
WASHINGTON -- "Publius" appeared to gain some modern friends on the Supreme Court yesterday, and that could mean trouble for laws in Maryland and other states that limit or ban anonymous political writings.A figure out of America's political beginnings, the political propagandist "Publius" apparently would be a law-breaker in Ohio if he were still writing under that pen name today, the justices were told.Responding to anonymous newspaper stories attacking the government that would be formed under the new U.S. Constitution, three of America's early leaders -- Alexander Hamilton, James Madison and John Jay -- wrote 85 essays -- the "Federalist Papers" -- to promote ratification of the Constitution.
NEWS
By George F. Will | August 23, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Rahm Emanuel is one of those windup dolls the president has been sending forth for seven months to deny the obvious. ("Did he have sex? No. Sexual relations? No.") But Emanuel is magnanimous: "I'm not owed an apology."Earth to Emanuel: What about the apology you owe the public, on whose payroll you have been while insulting the public's intelligence?Compassion being the defining virtue of an age dubious about all other virtues, Mr. Emanuel is presented as a victim, of Bill Clinton, just as Mr. Clinton presents himself as a victim (of Ken Starr and others disrespectful of Mr. Clinton's family values)
NEWS
September 26, 2012
I was about to send my check in for my subscription to The Sun when I read Dan Rodricks ' encomium to that resident of the fever swamps of the ideological left, Garrett Epps ("Wresting Constitution from the far right," Sept. 25). From whence the notion that the concept of restraining the power of the central government at the Constitutional Convention is a myth? Perhaps Mr. Rodricks and Mr. Epps would benefit from a rereading (if there ever was a first reading ) of The Federalist Papers instead of "Of Grammatology.
NEWS
By Carlos Fuentes | December 13, 1990
Carlos Fuentes is a Mexican novelist who was awarded the Cervantes Prize for Spanish Literature in 1988. He has just completed a documentary for BBC on the historical relationship between Spain and Latin America. WHEN THE European Conference on Security and Cooperation convened in Paris last month, German Chancellor Helmut Kohl warned against "retrograde nationalisms" that could disrupt the building of the "common house" of Europe. He was calling attention to one of the many paradoxes that stud, like sequins, the debutante's gown of the New World Order as it struggles to fashion itself amid the ruins of the Cold War.This gown could become the shirt of Nessus, which tears away the skin that wears it, unless forms of conciliation are found between the worldwide movement toward interdependence and the multiple nationalist tendencies that are now rising to contradict it. Nowhere is this truer than in the Soviet Union.
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