Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFederalist
IN THE NEWS

Federalist

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | September 3, 1992
This is the 52nd presidential election.The ninth was the most one-sided since George Washington's day.There was in fact no contest. Americans had had enough of partisan and sectional conflict. Good feelings did indeed dominate the era.President Monroe's Democratic-Republican Party, once so fearful of the federal idea, had become more nationalistic than the Federalists themselves.The Federalist Party went out of business for good.Even 85-year-old former Federalist President John Adams of Massachusetts cast his vote in the Elector- al College for Democratic-Republican President Monroe.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | March 26, 2012
The bleating about broken government and partisanship continues. "Why can't those boobs in Washington agree on anything?" We're constantly told that the way to fix the country is to dethrone the left and right and empower the middle. Americans Elect, No Labels, the Gangs of Six and Fourteen, conservative Democrats and liberal Republicans: Handing things over to these middling mincers and half-a-loafers is supposed to be the answer to all of our problems. It's as if we should just put Nelson Rockefeller's mug on the dollar bill and be done with it. But what if the real compromise isn't in forcing the left and the right to heel.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | September 2, 1992
This is the 52nd presidential election.The eighth was the last gasp of the Federalist Party. Demoralized because the War of 1812, which it had opposed, had turned out so well for the Democratic-Republican administration which waged it, the Federalists did not formally nominate anyone.(But electors chosen by the state legislators in Massachusetts, Connecticut and Delaware voted for Gov. Rufus King of New York for president and Maryland's John Eager Howard for vice president.)The Democratic-Republicans continued their Virginia dynasty, President Madison helping secure the nomination for his secretary of state, James Monroe, just as President Jefferson had helped secured the nomination for his secretary of state, Madison.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | August 10, 2008
Several weeks ago, I had written about vice presidential candidates who hailed from Maryland. Along with intrepid Sun researcher Paul McCardell, who has a deep and abiding affection and thorough working knowledge of Maryland history, we came up with two names and an almost was. Henry Gassaway Davis was the oldest vice presidential candidate when he ran with Democratic nominee Alton B. Parker in 1904. He was 80 at the time. Forty years ago, Spiro T. Agnew, former Baltimore County executive and Maryland governor, was nominated to be Richard M. Nixon's running mate at the Republican Convention at the Miami Beach Convention Center in Florida.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 30, 1992
QUEBEC CITY, Quebec -- Robert Bourassa, the premier of Quebec, began a campaign yesterday to convince skeptical Quebecers that an agreement just reached with English-speaking Canada resolves many of their grievances and should end their drive for independence.With polls signaling an uphill battle to win backing for the accord in a referendum on Oct. 26, the Quebec leader moved to overcome his first major hurdle.At a special conference of his Liberal Party at Laval University here, supporters of federalism who are allied with Mr. Bourassa beat back opposition to the agreement from nationalist elements in the party.
NEWS
February 1, 2004
On January 29, 2004, DR. PALMER HOWARD FUTCHER, beloved husband of the late Mary Rightor Futcher, devoted father of Jane P. Futcher and Marjorie R. Futcher. Also survived by his close friend Louise Brown. Services will take place at the Church of the Redeemer (Chapel) 5603 N. Charles Street, on Tuesday, February 3 at 10:30 A.M. Interment following at Green Mount Cemetery. A Memorial Service will take place at Broadmead on Friday, February 6 at 11 A.M. In lieu of flowers memorial contributions may be sent to The World Federalist Movement, 777 United Nations Plaza, New York, NY 10017.
NEWS
By Jack Rakove | January 23, 1995
NEWT GINGRICH has placed "The Federalist Papers" high on his list of readings for the new Republican majority in the House. Somewhere James Madison is smiling -- and not only at the thought that his essays supporting the Constitution are still being read more than two centuries later. For the ideasabout representation that Madison expressed in "The Federalist" do not sit well with those the new speaker is expected to put into practice.Consider, for starters, these differences:Madison wrote "The Federalist" to convince Americans of the benefits of national government; Mr. Gingrich's "Contract With America" assumes Congress is more likely to do wrong, and that his mission is to restore power to the states.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2005
A lot of speculation has gone into a simple matter of fact: Has Judge John G. Roberts Jr., the president's nominee to the Supreme Court, been a member of the Federalist Society? The society won't say for sure, citing privacy concerns, but this much is clear: Roberts, a federal appellate judge, has spoken to the group and, in the late 1990s, was part of a steering committee for its Washington chapter while working at a prestigious D.C. law firm. Whether he has paid his $50-a-year dues might be beside the point.
NEWS
February 1, 2004
On January 29, 2004, DR. PALMER HOWARD FUTCHER, beloved husband of the late Mary Rightor Futcher, devoted father of Jane P. Futcher and Marjorie R. Futcher. Also survived by his close friend Louise Brown. Services will take place at the Church of the Redeemer (Chapel) 5603 N. Charles Street, on Tuesday, February 3 at 10:30 A.M. Interment following at Green Mount Cemetery. A Memorial Service will take place at Broadmead on Friday, February 6 at 11 A.M. In lieu of flowers memorial contributions may be sent to The World Federalist Movement, 777 United Nations Plaza, New York, NY 10017.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 17, 2002
WASHINGTON - In the early days of the Bush administration, allegiance to the conservative debate club known as the Federalist Society was declared almost in a whisper. A nominee for a top Justice Department post, grilled by a Democratic senator last year about his membership in the society, professed that he had no idea what its politics were. Judicial nominees, meanwhile, scrambled to disavow positions they had taken before the society. As critics attacked its influence in the White House, members complained of McCarthyite smear tactics.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 12, 2000
Before Miami attorney Joseph Klock could mistake yet another member of the U.S. Supreme Court for the late Justice William Brennan, the court's conservative intellectual interjected: "Mr. Klock, I'm Scalia," the justice said, as the Supreme Court chamber erupted in laughter. "Yes, sir. I remember that," Klock replied. "It will be hard to forget. " As if anyone would forget Antonin Scalia and his defense of the court stepping back into the biggest political dogfight of the century. When the court called an abrupt halt Saturday to the manual vote recounts in Florida, its action may well have scuttled Vice President Al Gore's only chance to wrest the presidency from Texas Gov. George W. Bush before the Electoral College meets Dec. 18. When the justices in the minority spoke out against the court-ordered stay, Scalia swiftly and sharply defended the majority of five who approved it. That he spoke out wasn't as significant as what he said, legal experts say. He countered their criticism of the majority's decision with a succinct critique of their dissent.
NEWS
By Young Chang and Young Chang,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 16, 1999
U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia spoke to high school students at the Park School yesterday about the Constitution, telling them they should read the "Federalist Papers" for a better understanding of the document.Scalia said the essays, written between 1787 and 1788 by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison and John Jay, would serve the students better than "listening to me."About 300 students from the upper school heard the conservative justice speak at Park's Meyerhoff Theater. Many raised their hands afterward, and a few were called on to speak.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 14, 1998
A document dealing with such matters as furtive White House meetings and a dress from the Gap was the most talked-about publication in America this weekend.But another, more venerable, volume was getting substantial attention: The Federalist Papers, the collection of articles published by Alexander Hamilton, John Jay and James Madison in 1787 and 1788 to make their case for the adoption of the Constitution.The Federalist articles, in addition to their many other contributions, amplified the bare description in the Constitution that the president, vice president and other officials could be "removed from office on impeachment for, and conviction of, treason, bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.