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NEWS
By DICK POLMAN | August 13, 1995
In politics, "welfare" is a loaded word.It has been an albatross for Democrats since the 1970s. For Republicans it has been a hated symbol of Washington largess, and for decades they have vowed to trash or reform the whole program.Last week, they had their chance. In fact, it was supposed to be a great week for Sen. Bob Dole, a chance to enhance his presidential credentials by trumpeting his skills as a leader. With help from a united band of Senate Republicans, he had planned to honor one of the key conservative tenets of the 1994 election: ending federal welfare, and shifting the burden to the states.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 6, 2004
WASHINGTON - Welfare programs around the country are in limbo because of a stalemate in Congress that has prompted state officials to postpone new investments in child care, expansions of job training and most other initiatives for welfare recipients and low-wage workers. Congressional Republicans insist that stricter work requirements must be part of any effort to renew the 1996 welfare law. Democrats, including some who voted against that measure, now embrace it, saying only minor changes are needed.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 8, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Billions of dollars in federal welfare money is piling up in the Treasury, unused by state officials, who won control of the money in 1996 by arguing that they knew best how to spend it for the benefit of poor people.More than half the states failed to use the full amounts of their federal welfare grants last year, federal and state officials say. Data compiled by the Department of Health and Human Services show that states had an unused balance of $3 billion, out of $12 billion made available in the first nine months of last year.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 22, 2004
WASHINGTON -- In a trend that has surprised many experts, the federal welfare rolls have declined over the past three years, even as unemployment, poverty and the number of food stamp recipients have surged in a weak economy. After Congress overhauled the nation's welfare system in 1996, the number of families receiving benefits dropped much faster than federal and state officials had expected. Even more remarkable, officials say, the rolls did not grow during the recession of 2001 or the sluggish economy since.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | September 18, 1996
The Glendening administration said yesterday that it plans to put Maryland on the fast track to welfare reform by conforming with sweeping new federal rules nine months earlier than required.Alvin Collins, Maryland's secretary of human resources, told the General Assembly's Joint Committee on Welfare Reform that the state would move aggressively to submit a plan of action to the federal government by Oct. 1.The state could have waited until July.Officials said they were swayed by the extra $10.8 million in block grants Maryland would receive by not exercising its option to wait.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 6, 1996
WASHINGTON -- State officials have concluded that many options given to them by the new welfare law conflict with long-standing interpretations of the U.S. Constitution and state constitutions.But in its first actions under the law, the Clinton administration has indicated that it will approve state welfare plans even if it believes that some of their elements violate the U.S. Constitution.Last Monday, the administration gave a green light to Wisconsin and Michigan, saying that they were eligible to run their own programs with lump sums of federal money significantly larger than they would have received under the old welfare law.But the administration raised constitutional questions about both state plans.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 8, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Moving a step closer to a long-delayed and potentially contentious debate over federal welfare reform, Senate Republicans yesterday peeled away a set of Democratic proposals designed to blunt the impact of the GOP's own, more stringent proposals.By a near-solid party line 54-45 vote, the Senate rejected a series of Democrat-backed amendments to the welfare package sponsored by Majority Leader Bob Dole of Kansas.And Mr. Dole suggested that Republicans are near agreement NTC on an alternative.
NEWS
September 2, 2003
WHAT DOES IT mean when applications for welfare spike in the affluent suburbs? Are these cases, like dead canaries in coal mines, signals of impending disaster? For the working poor who have lost their jobs and can't find new ones, disaster is all too obvious. And it may be closer for other families struggling through a jobless economic recovery. Unemployment benefits are running out for millions, so some families are turning to welfare for help. It's not surprising, then, to see the increases in welfare cases reported in many Maryland counties by The Sun's Larry Carson.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 22, 2004
WASHINGTON -- In a trend that has surprised many experts, the federal welfare rolls have declined over the past three years, even as unemployment, poverty and the number of food stamp recipients have surged in a weak economy. After Congress overhauled the nation's welfare system in 1996, the number of families receiving benefits dropped much faster than federal and state officials had expected. Even more remarkable, officials say, the rolls did not grow during the recession of 2001 or the sluggish economy since.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 13, 1994
WASHINGTON -- After a campaign in which voters rewarded a barrage of anti-welfare attacks, both parties are calling the issue a top priority, and both are repeating promises to make recipients work.As the smoke clears from the new political landscape, Democrats and Republicans each appear ready to cut benefits, increase work obligations and provide fewer protections for the 14.3 million people who rely on Aid to Families with Dependent Children, the main federal welfare program. More than 9 million of the recipients are children.
NEWS
September 2, 2003
WHAT DOES IT mean when applications for welfare spike in the affluent suburbs? Are these cases, like dead canaries in coal mines, signals of impending disaster? For the working poor who have lost their jobs and can't find new ones, disaster is all too obvious. And it may be closer for other families struggling through a jobless economic recovery. Unemployment benefits are running out for millions, so some families are turning to welfare for help. It's not surprising, then, to see the increases in welfare cases reported in many Maryland counties by The Sun's Larry Carson.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 8, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Billions of dollars in federal welfare money is piling up in the Treasury, unused by state officials, who won control of the money in 1996 by arguing that they knew best how to spend it for the benefit of poor people.More than half the states failed to use the full amounts of their federal welfare grants last year, federal and state officials say. Data compiled by the Department of Health and Human Services show that states had an unused balance of $3 billion, out of $12 billion made available in the first nine months of last year.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 6, 1997
To adapt to new federal welfare reforms, Baltimore County officials are struggling to plug gaps in job training programs -- even as they cut hundreds of families from welfare rolls.County officials have halted locally funded $10 monthly welfare supplements and plan to shift that money -- a total of $695,000 -- to programs that teach job skills. Half that amount, enough to pay for training 110 people, is up for approval at tonight's County Council meeting."You can't press a button and say 'Hey, here's a job,' " County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger says.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | October 24, 1996
HAVRE DE GRACE -- ''The last thing we need in our society,'' said Kweisi Mfume earlier this month, ''is 50 welfare systems.''The NAACP president expressed this judgment during a luncheon speech to a convention of editorial writers, who were gathered in Baltimore to party it up and exchange ideas about how to tell their readers what to think. For all I know, all of them agreed with Mr. Mfume, who is a talented and sometimes passionate speaker.At any rate, none of those present was rude enough, or perhaps awake enough, to leap up and challenge him -- to ask why, with the federal welfare system an acknowledged catastrophe, it wouldn't make much more sense to let each state devise its own approach.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 6, 1996
WASHINGTON -- State officials have concluded that many options given to them by the new welfare law conflict with long-standing interpretations of the U.S. Constitution and state constitutions.But in its first actions under the law, the Clinton administration has indicated that it will approve state welfare plans even if it believes that some of their elements violate the U.S. Constitution.Last Monday, the administration gave a green light to Wisconsin and Michigan, saying that they were eligible to run their own programs with lump sums of federal money significantly larger than they would have received under the old welfare law.But the administration raised constitutional questions about both state plans.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | September 18, 1996
The Glendening administration said yesterday that it plans to put Maryland on the fast track to welfare reform by conforming with sweeping new federal rules nine months earlier than required.Alvin Collins, Maryland's secretary of human resources, told the General Assembly's Joint Committee on Welfare Reform that the state would move aggressively to submit a plan of action to the federal government by Oct. 1.The state could have waited until July.Officials said they were swayed by the extra $10.8 million in block grants Maryland would receive by not exercising its option to wait.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | October 24, 1996
HAVRE DE GRACE -- ''The last thing we need in our society,'' said Kweisi Mfume earlier this month, ''is 50 welfare systems.''The NAACP president expressed this judgment during a luncheon speech to a convention of editorial writers, who were gathered in Baltimore to party it up and exchange ideas about how to tell their readers what to think. For all I know, all of them agreed with Mr. Mfume, who is a talented and sometimes passionate speaker.At any rate, none of those present was rude enough, or perhaps awake enough, to leap up and challenge him -- to ask why, with the federal welfare system an acknowledged catastrophe, it wouldn't make much more sense to let each state devise its own approach.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 6, 1997
To adapt to new federal welfare reforms, Baltimore County officials are struggling to plug gaps in job training programs -- even as they cut hundreds of families from welfare rolls.County officials have halted locally funded $10 monthly welfare supplements and plan to shift that money -- a total of $695,000 -- to programs that teach job skills. Half that amount, enough to pay for training 110 people, is up for approval at tonight's County Council meeting."You can't press a button and say 'Hey, here's a job,' " County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger says.
NEWS
By Linda Seebach | August 11, 1996
THE FEDERAL welfare system was a mistake from the beginning, and this month's overwhelming vote in Congress to abandon it is merely a recognition of something the rest of the country has known for a long time.When it takes decades to fix something that is so clearly broken, that's evidence of a more general problem.Bad federal policies are much more destructive than bad state policies. They affect far more people, they're harder to change and they deprive us of the opportunity to try out a variety of policy options before we bet the whole country on one solution.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 8, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Moving a step closer to a long-delayed and potentially contentious debate over federal welfare reform, Senate Republicans yesterday peeled away a set of Democratic proposals designed to blunt the impact of the GOP's own, more stringent proposals.By a near-solid party line 54-45 vote, the Senate rejected a series of Democrat-backed amendments to the welfare package sponsored by Majority Leader Bob Dole of Kansas.And Mr. Dole suggested that Republicans are near agreement NTC on an alternative.
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