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By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2010
Howard County will add three electric buses that use an advanced technology — the first of its kind in an American public transit system — that lets the vehicles be recharged without plugging them into an outlet. County executive Ken Ulman announced that Howard Transit has received federal funding to acquire the full-size, lightweight buses for use on routes in and around Columbia. The buses use what is called an inductive charger that repowers the bus batteries without a physical connection.
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NEWS
By Randal O'Toole | July 31, 2014
Transit agencies from Baltimore to San Diego and from Seattle to St. Petersburg are planning new light-rail lines. Yet light rail is not only vastly more expensive than buses, it is slower, less comfortable, less convenient and has lower capacities than a well-designed rapid-bus system. Being expensive to build, light rail can only reach parts of a region and thus most people have to drive to a park-and-ride station or transfer from a bus to train and back, thus lengthening the time of their trip.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2010
The Maryland Transit Administration has revised its proposal for the east-west Red Line, scrapping a plan to use a single track in a tunnel under Cooks Lane in West Baltimore and replacing it with a more costly double-track option. According to the MTA, new ridership estimates have come in higher, allowing it to propose a somewhat more expensive transit line including some of the features that had been trimmed to keep it within the federal government's cost-benefit formula.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun and By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2013
You probably won't hear these buses coming. If they show up as expected on the Howard Transit Green Route in the spring of 2015, they'll be the first of their kind in Maryland to run a municipal loop. They will likely be greeted with fanfare, even if they won't make much noise themselves - since they'll run entirely on electricity. "They're very quiet," said John Powell, administrator for the county's Office of Transportation. "One of the interesting aspects of the electric buses is you hear everything else" but the engine.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun and By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2013
You probably won't hear these buses coming. If they show up as expected on the Howard Transit Green Route in the spring of 2015, they'll be the first of their kind in Maryland to run a municipal loop. They will likely be greeted with fanfare, even if they won't make much noise themselves - since they'll run entirely on electricity. "They're very quiet," said John Powell, administrator for the county's Office of Transportation. "One of the interesting aspects of the electric buses is you hear everything else" but the engine.
NEWS
By Randal O'Toole | July 31, 2014
Transit agencies from Baltimore to San Diego and from Seattle to St. Petersburg are planning new light-rail lines. Yet light rail is not only vastly more expensive than buses, it is slower, less comfortable, less convenient and has lower capacities than a well-designed rapid-bus system. Being expensive to build, light rail can only reach parts of a region and thus most people have to drive to a park-and-ride station or transfer from a bus to train and back, thus lengthening the time of their trip.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2012
Even though there's no promise of construction money, the state is pushing ahead to draft blueprints for Baltimore's $2.2 billion Red Line light rail project. The Maryland Transit Authority has asked a regional transportation panel to approve $55.6 million in federal funds for preliminary engineering — a request that was put on hold last year until congressional passage of a two-year, $105 billion transportation package. The Baltimore Regional Transportation Board is scheduled to vote on the request Nov. 27 and will accept public comments at a meeting Thursday afternoon at Baltimore Metropolitan Council headquarters.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2011
A $4.7 million plan to buy and use three electric buses for public transit in Columbia was rescued by Howard Community College officials, who agreed last week to host a recharging station for the vehicles after owners of The Mall in Columbia refused. The three 35-passenger vehicles would be the first of their kind used for public transit in the United States, said John W. Powell Jr., CEO of Central Maryland Regional Transit, a nonprofit group that administers the transit system covering Howard County, Laurel City and western Anne Arundel County.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | June 14, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The Federal Transit Administration and Maryland's U.S. Senators Barbara A. Mikulski and Paul S. Sarbanes announced yesterday the release of $9.8 million in federal funds to the state Department of Transportation for construction of a 13.5-mile extension of the MARC rail service to Frederick.The new extension on MARC's Brunswick line will go from Point of Rocks to Frederick and will take commuters into Union Station in Washington or Pennsylvania Station in Baltimore. The funds also will pay for six new locomotives to service the expansion.
NEWS
By Katherine Shaver, The Washington Post | May 21, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley has long promised that Baltimore and the Washington suburbs would each get a new light-rail line and that the Red Line and its Purple counterpart outside D.C. could be built at the same time. But state financial documents recently submitted to the Federal Transit Administration show that O'Malley's promise, to the state's most populous regions, will be difficult — if not impossible — to keep. The General Assembly's recent rejection of the governor's proposed gas tax hike makes it increasingly likely that the state will have to choose to build one line before the other, state and local transportation officials say. With no new tax revenue dedicated to transportation, finding the money for even one of the light-rail lines will be difficult, the officials say. The state hoped to begin construction on both lines in 2015, with the 14-mile Red Line — which would ultimately run from Woodlawn to the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center — opening in early 2021 and the 16-mile Purple Line opening between Bethesda and New Carrollton by late 2020.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2012
Even though there's no promise of construction money, the state is pushing ahead to draft blueprints for Baltimore's $2.2 billion Red Line light rail project. The Maryland Transit Authority has asked a regional transportation panel to approve $55.6 million in federal funds for preliminary engineering — a request that was put on hold last year until congressional passage of a two-year, $105 billion transportation package. The Baltimore Regional Transportation Board is scheduled to vote on the request Nov. 27 and will accept public comments at a meeting Thursday afternoon at Baltimore Metropolitan Council headquarters.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2011
A $4.7 million plan to buy and use three electric buses for public transit in Columbia was rescued by Howard Community College officials, who agreed last week to host a recharging station for the vehicles after owners of The Mall in Columbia refused. The three 35-passenger vehicles would be the first of their kind used for public transit in the United States, said John W. Powell Jr., CEO of Central Maryland Regional Transit, a nonprofit group that administers the transit system covering Howard County, Laurel City and western Anne Arundel County.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2010
Howard County will add three electric buses that use an advanced technology — the first of its kind in an American public transit system — that lets the vehicles be recharged without plugging them into an outlet. County executive Ken Ulman announced that Howard Transit has received federal funding to acquire the full-size, lightweight buses for use on routes in and around Columbia. The buses use what is called an inductive charger that repowers the bus batteries without a physical connection.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2010
The Maryland Transit Administration has revised its proposal for the east-west Red Line, scrapping a plan to use a single track in a tunnel under Cooks Lane in West Baltimore and replacing it with a more costly double-track option. According to the MTA, new ridership estimates have come in higher, allowing it to propose a somewhat more expensive transit line including some of the features that had been trimmed to keep it within the federal government's cost-benefit formula.
NEWS
April 28, 1995
Howard County officials took delivery yesterday of three replacement buses that will be used to upgrade the Columbia Association's aging ColumBus shuttle fleet.The three buses -- which cost a total of $496,000 -- were paid for mostly through a Federal Transit Administration grant. The remaining 20 percent was split between the state Mass Transit Administration and the county government.The ColumBus system has eight buses to operate its existing four routes. Three of the routes serve Columbia, and one route reaches the county government complex in Ellicott City.
NEWS
November 24, 2008
Teach kids the skills to resolve conflicts I was touched and saddened by two articles in Thursday's Baltimore Sun. A page one article told of a 16-year-old Baltimore girl who unintentionally caused the death of her grandmother in an argument over pictures on the wall in her room ("Baltimore teen charged in her grandmother's death after argument," Nov. 20). She's charged with second-degree murder. A second article told of a 16-year-old Glen Burnie boy who was succeeding in school ("Teen accused in killing praised by social worker," Nov. 20)
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