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By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2013
The Federal Trade Commission announced Tuesday that it reached a settlement with two auto dealers in Ohio and Maryland, including Timonium Chrysler Inc. of Cockeysville, over charges of deceptive ads on the cost of vehicles or available discounts. The agency said that the Cockeysville dealer, which does business under the name of Don White's Timonium Jeep Chrysler Dodge, promoted discounts and "Internet prices," but allegedly failed to tell consumers that they needed to qualify for rebates generally not available to them.
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BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2013
Nielsen Holdings on Friday announced an agreement with the Federal Trade Commission that the company says clears the way for it to buy Columbia-based Arbitron. Nielsen, best known for its TV ratings, announced in December plans to acquire Arbitron in a $1.3 billion deal. The FTC subsequently raised charges that the proposed deal could reduce competition significantly, causing advertisers, programmers and others to pay more for certain audience measurement services. The agreement calls for Nielsen, within three months, to sell and license certain Arbitron assets related to its cross-platform audience measurement services to a buyer approved by the FTC, the agency said.
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NEWS
November 12, 2003
Do-not-call fraud: The Federal Trade Commission cautions seniors that the commission does not call people to have their names put on a "do-not-call list." People should never give personal information such as Social Security numbers, bank account numbers or personal identification numbers to anyone they do not know and trust. To request a pamphlet on this matter: 301-588-6380. Constituent assistance: Anne Irby, constituent liaison for Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin, meets with the public from 11 a.m. to noon the first Thursday of every month at O'Malley Senior Center to help constituents deal with federal agencies and to discuss concerns.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2013
The Federal Trade Commission announced Tuesday that it reached a settlement with two auto dealers in Ohio and Maryland, including Timonium Chrysler Inc. of Cockeysville, over charges of deceptive ads on the cost of vehicles or available discounts. The agency said that the Cockeysville dealer, which does business under the name of Don White's Timonium Jeep Chrysler Dodge, promoted discounts and "Internet prices," but allegedly failed to tell consumers that they needed to qualify for rebates generally not available to them.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2007
Think twice before you open bogus e-mail from an all-too-helpful "Fraud Department" claiming to be associated with the Federal Trade Commission. The e-mail is laced with links and attachments that download a virus that could grab passwords and account numbers from your computer. It commonly refers to complaints filed against the recipient and includes a phony sender's address from frauddep@ftc.gov. Despite an image of the FTC seal, alert consumers will spot grammatical errors, misspellings and incorrect syntax.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2013
Nielsen Holdings on Friday announced an agreement with the Federal Trade Commission that the company says clears the way for it to buy Columbia-based Arbitron. Nielsen, best known for its TV ratings, announced in December plans to acquire Arbitron in a $1.3 billion deal. The FTC subsequently raised charges that the proposed deal could reduce competition significantly, causing advertisers, programmers and others to pay more for certain audience measurement services. The agreement calls for Nielsen, within three months, to sell and license certain Arbitron assets related to its cross-platform audience measurement services to a buyer approved by the FTC, the agency said.
NEWS
May 18, 1998
Miles W. Kirkpatrick,79, a Philadelphia lawyer who oversaw a study that was sharply critical of the Federal Trade Commission and was then given the job of rejuvenating the agency as itschairman, died of cancer May 2 at his home in Strafford, Pa.In 1969, at the request of President Richard M. Nixon, he led a bar association commission that examined the FTC.The panel concluded that too many high-level employees were incompetent or were do-nothings, and that...
BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | April 8, 2005
ATLANTA - Carol DiBattiste, hired by ChoicePoint Inc. to head a new office designed to guard against a repeat of the recent invasion into its consumer information database, will get a $500,000 yearly salary. In a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, the company said yesterday that DiBattiste will get a weekly salary of $9,615.38, and a bonus of not less than $350,000 this year. She will get an additional $100,000 bonus if she stays with the company until April 25, 2006. At the time of DiBattiste's hiring, John Hamre, chairman of ChoicePoint's privacy committee, said the new position was designed to "regain the trust of consumers that their information is being used only for their benefit, or the benefit of society at large."
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2010
An unfamiliar transaction on a credit card statement might not raise too much alarm if it's just a few dollars. But all those dollars add up. Take the case of a recently halted international scheme that bilked more than 1 million customers of more than $10 million since at least 2006, all funneled through dummy corporations, according to the Federal Trade Commission. How did the scam continue unchecked for so long? By making small, unauthorized charges of 20 cents to $10. The money was then laundered through bank accounts in countries such as Bulgaria, Cyprus and Kyrgyzstan, with the help of "money mules" that wired money overseas.
BUSINESS
By Jim Puzzanghera and Don Lee and Tribune Newspapers | December 17, 2009
The Federal Trade Commission on Wednesday sued Intel Corp., accusing the computer chip giant of abusing its market dominance for a decade to stifle competition and strengthen its monopoly. The FTC alleges that Intel has waged a systematic and illegal campaign to shut out rival makers of central processing unit chips, the main brains of a computer, by cutting off their access to the marketplace. In doing so, the agency contends, the world's largest chipmaker has deprived consumers of choice by denying them access to potentially superior chips and lower prices.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2011
A federal judge has shuttered a Baltimore couple's businesses and frozen most of their assets after the Federal Trade Commission accused the prominent pair — well known within the city's Hispanic community — of illegally selling slipshod immigration services to hundreds of local Latinos. Manuel and Lola Alban, ages 70 and 66 respectively, are accused in court documents of lying about their qualifications and taking hundreds of thousands of dollars from more than 800 foreigners for services they weren't authorized to perform, such as filing documents required for U.S. residency.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2010
An unfamiliar transaction on a credit card statement might not raise too much alarm if it's just a few dollars. But all those dollars add up. Take the case of a recently halted international scheme that bilked more than 1 million customers of more than $10 million since at least 2006, all funneled through dummy corporations, according to the Federal Trade Commission. How did the scam continue unchecked for so long? By making small, unauthorized charges of 20 cents to $10. The money was then laundered through bank accounts in countries such as Bulgaria, Cyprus and Kyrgyzstan, with the help of "money mules" that wired money overseas.
BUSINESS
By Jim Puzzanghera and Don Lee and Tribune Newspapers | December 17, 2009
The Federal Trade Commission on Wednesday sued Intel Corp., accusing the computer chip giant of abusing its market dominance for a decade to stifle competition and strengthen its monopoly. The FTC alleges that Intel has waged a systematic and illegal campaign to shut out rival makers of central processing unit chips, the main brains of a computer, by cutting off their access to the marketplace. In doing so, the agency contends, the world's largest chipmaker has deprived consumers of choice by denying them access to potentially superior chips and lower prices.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2007
Think twice before you open bogus e-mail from an all-too-helpful "Fraud Department" claiming to be associated with the Federal Trade Commission. The e-mail is laced with links and attachments that download a virus that could grab passwords and account numbers from your computer. It commonly refers to complaints filed against the recipient and includes a phony sender's address from frauddep@ftc.gov. Despite an image of the FTC seal, alert consumers will spot grammatical errors, misspellings and incorrect syntax.
BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | April 8, 2005
ATLANTA - Carol DiBattiste, hired by ChoicePoint Inc. to head a new office designed to guard against a repeat of the recent invasion into its consumer information database, will get a $500,000 yearly salary. In a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, the company said yesterday that DiBattiste will get a weekly salary of $9,615.38, and a bonus of not less than $350,000 this year. She will get an additional $100,000 bonus if she stays with the company until April 25, 2006. At the time of DiBattiste's hiring, John Hamre, chairman of ChoicePoint's privacy committee, said the new position was designed to "regain the trust of consumers that their information is being used only for their benefit, or the benefit of society at large."
NEWS
November 12, 2003
Do-not-call fraud: The Federal Trade Commission cautions seniors that the commission does not call people to have their names put on a "do-not-call list." People should never give personal information such as Social Security numbers, bank account numbers or personal identification numbers to anyone they do not know and trust. To request a pamphlet on this matter: 301-588-6380. Constituent assistance: Anne Irby, constituent liaison for Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin, meets with the public from 11 a.m. to noon the first Thursday of every month at O'Malley Senior Center to help constituents deal with federal agencies and to discuss concerns.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | August 20, 1994
The Federal Trade Commission has effectively approved the merger of R. H. Macy & Co. and Federated Department Stores Inc., removing another potential obstacle to a combination of the two department store companies.Federated said yesterday that the FTC had terminated its investigation into possible antitrust issues raised by the merger. While the agency does not formally approve such deals, the end of its inquiry effectively clears the way for the Federated-Macy union to go forward.The two companies must still satisfy state regulators that their combination will not result in reduced competition.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2011
A federal judge has shuttered a Baltimore couple's businesses and frozen most of their assets after the Federal Trade Commission accused the prominent pair — well known within the city's Hispanic community — of illegally selling slipshod immigration services to hundreds of local Latinos. Manuel and Lola Alban, ages 70 and 66 respectively, are accused in court documents of lying about their qualifications and taking hundreds of thousands of dollars from more than 800 foreigners for services they weren't authorized to perform, such as filing documents required for U.S. residency.
NEWS
May 18, 1998
Miles W. Kirkpatrick,79, a Philadelphia lawyer who oversaw a study that was sharply critical of the Federal Trade Commission and was then given the job of rejuvenating the agency as itschairman, died of cancer May 2 at his home in Strafford, Pa.In 1969, at the request of President Richard M. Nixon, he led a bar association commission that examined the FTC.The panel concluded that too many high-level employees were incompetent or were do-nothings, and that...
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | August 20, 1994
The Federal Trade Commission has effectively approved the merger of R. H. Macy & Co. and Federated Department Stores Inc., removing another potential obstacle to a combination of the two department store companies.Federated said yesterday that the FTC had terminated its investigation into possible antitrust issues raised by the merger. While the agency does not formally approve such deals, the end of its inquiry effectively clears the way for the Federated-Macy union to go forward.The two companies must still satisfy state regulators that their combination will not result in reduced competition.
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