Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFederal Rules
IN THE NEWS

Federal Rules

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By LOS ANGLES TIMES | November 26, 2000
The great economic boom of the 1990s lifted the fortunes of almost every disadvantaged group, including racial minorities, high school dropouts and single mothers. But new studies and employment specialists say that there has been a notable exception: the millions of disabled men and women. As a group, researchers say, their employment and earnings actually fell over the last decade, while the rest of the U.S. work force reaped the fruits of the long economic expansion. The lack of progress in jobs for those with disabilities, so at odds with other improvements that are a source of pride for Americans, is one of today's most puzzling and controversial labor issues.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 17, 2014
The most popular rifle in America is the AR-15, which looks like M-16 but does not operate like one. Maryland's legislature banned the look in spite of fact that the function never matched ( "Federal judge upholds assault rifle ban," Aug. 12). Science and records say assault rifles are seldom involved in crime. Research and common sense says good guys with guns save lives. While cops are usually good guys, their failure rate is high. Maryland put almost 60 bad cops in jail over the last two years.
Advertisement
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 13, 1996
WASHINGTON -- In their most specific response yet to California's marijuana initiative, federal officials warned yesterday that under federal law, a doctor's prescription does not excuse pilots, engineers or bus and truck drivers who test positive for drugs."
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | August 3, 2014
Fact: Captured Hamas fighters confirm that their maze of secret tunnels into Israel was to be the entry point for a series of coordinated terror attacks during the Jewish High Holidays - all in order to massacre Israeli citizens at lightly guarded border settlements. Opinion: Americans should keep this scenario in mind as Secretary of State John Kerry readily adopts Hamas talking points and positions in his attempts to secure a "humanitarian" cease-fire. Hamas views such cessations of hostilities as mere opportunities to re-load in their ongoing campaign to reign terror (and ultimately destroy)
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | December 31, 2003
New federal rules aimed at keeping drowsy truck drivers off the road go into effect Sunday, the first change in more than 60 years, but not everyone agrees they will save lives and protect property. Fatigue costs about $2.3 billion a year in losses and causes about 410 of the nearly 5,000 deaths from large truck crashes, according to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, which held a press conference yesterday to publicize the new "hours of service" rules. The agency studied sleep patterns and conferred with the industry, and came up with a trade-off: New rules allow interstate drivers to stay on the road an extra hour, up to 11 hours, in exchange for taking two more hours off. Currently, truckers are limited to driving 10 hours at a time and must rest at least eight hours.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
A U.S. Court of Appeals panel has upheld a decision that Maryland strayed into federal-only territory when it tried to jump start construction of a power plant with subsidies. The Maryland Public Service Commission, concerned about reliability problems if more power plants aren't built, struck a deal for ratepayers to subsidize a natural gas-fired facility in Waldorf any time the wholesale price for its electricity fell below a certain level. The plant was slated to open next year.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Lisa Goldberg and Andrea F. Siegel and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2002
Maryland's Medicaid program violated federal rules when it refused to reimburse Johns Hopkins Hospital for two teen-agers' life-saving liver transplants after the state said the operations were not "appropriate," Maryland's highest court said yesterday. Federal Medicaid guidelines clearly state that only medical necessity - not whether a life-saving procedure is "appropriate" - is the standard that applies to patients under age 21, the Court of Appeals said in a unanimous ruling. The case, which stems from a pair of operations costing a total of $264,000, could affect a range of Medicaid-funded procedures for children that require preauthorization under Maryland regulations, such as other transplants and mental health services, lawyers said.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun reporter | May 16, 2008
Fans who ride the Maryland Transit Administration's buses from local park-and-ride lots to Orioles and Ravens games will soon have to find a new way to the stadium under new federal rules restricting the types of services public transit agencies are permitted to offer. As of June 2, the MTA will stop offering $10 rides from its White Marsh, Essex and Southwest park-and-rides to Orioles games, spokeswoman Jawauna Greene said yesterday. The same rules, issued by the Federal Transit Administration, also will force cancellation of weekend bus service from the Greenbelt Metro station to Oriole Park at Camden Yards.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Evening Sun Staff | August 9, 1991
Gov. William Donald Schaefer, who earlier this week endorsed a Bush administration plan to open millions of acres of wetlands to development, now says he wants to find a "middle ground" in the environmental controversy.The governor's office late yesterday released a letter to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator William K. Reilly, in which Schaefer stresses that proposed rules for identifying wetlands must be tested in the field to determine their impact before they are adopted.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 20, 2000
WASHINGTON - Thirteen states from all regions of the country will try to impose new controls on pollution from truck and bus engines today, when they announce a plan to jointly adopt emission limits that would be far stricter than existing federal rules. State air pollution officials say they are acting because they can toughen the rules sooner than the federal Environmental Protection Agency will. The agency agrees. "We support this backstop move," said Robert W. Perciasepe, the head of the EPA's air pollution program.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Under a new federal accountability system, Maryland is no longer in compliance with the rules governing special-education students because the state's schools exempt a high percentage of students from national testing. The announcement this week by federal education officials means Maryland will have to pressure local school systems to include more students in the National Assessment of Educational Testing, a national test in math and reading that is given every two years. Thirty other states and the District of Columbia were also found out of compliance for a variety of reasons.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
A U.S. Court of Appeals panel has upheld a decision that Maryland strayed into federal-only territory when it tried to jump start construction of a power plant with subsidies. The Maryland Public Service Commission, concerned about reliability problems if more power plants aren't built, struck a deal for ratepayers to subsidize a natural gas-fired facility in Waldorf any time the wholesale price for its electricity fell below a certain level. The plant was slated to open next year.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
After a federal judge found that Maryland's historically black colleges face unfair and unconstitutional competition from the state's predominantly white universities, the parties headed into negotiations this month to work it out. But even with the far-reaching court decision, some worried the rights of black institutions wouldn't be protected and tried to put the judge's ruling on the books as state law. "I'm normally not a Doubting Thomas,"...
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2013
State officials and attorneys representing Maryland's historically black colleges and universities will head to mediation to resolve the remnants of a legal battle spurred by the institutions' complaint that the state hasn't done enough to help them overcome segregation-era policies. Dori Henry, a spokeswoman for Gov. Martin O'Malley, said that the parties, have "agreed to attempt to mediate the remaining issue in the case," and that U.S. District Court Judge Paul W. Grimm will serve as the mediator.
NEWS
August 11, 2013
A federal appellate court last week found fault with two Frederick County sheriff's deputies who arrested a Salvadoran woman on the basis of a civil immigration warrant, but county officials appear unbowed in their determination to act as adjunct border patrol agents. After discussing the case at their meeting Thursday, four of the five county commissioners voted to send a letter of support to the sheriff and his deputies, and Commissioners President Blaine Young pledged that county officials would continue to enforce immigration laws as much as possible in an effort to make Frederick the Maryland county that is "most unfriendly to illegal aliens.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2012
Ruling in a bitterly contested case with national ramifications, a federal judge found Thursday that the Waterkeeper Alliance failed to prove that an Eastern Shore farm's chicken houses were polluting a tributary of the Chesapeake Bay. U.S. District Court Judge William M. Nickerson declared in a 50-page opinion that the New York-based environmental group had not established in a two-week trial in October that waste from chicken houses owned by...
BUSINESS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1996
In a victory for environmentalists, a Senate committee yesterday killed a bill that would have sharply restricted the state's ability to enact regulations that go beyond federal rules.The measure, which had already passed the House of Delegates, was needed to make the state more competitive for attracting and retaining employers, business leaders said.The bill, sponsored by Sen. J. Lowell Stoltzfus, an Eastern Shore Republican, would have all but prohibited the state from enacting regulations that are stricter than federal rules, environmentalists said.
NEWS
By Roll Call Report Syndicate | April 30, 1995
Here is how members of Maryland's delegation on Capitol Hill were recorded on important roll-call votes last week. There were no House votes:Y: YES N: NO X: NOT VOTINGSENATE: LAWYERSBy a vote of 45 for and 52 against, the Senate failed to table an amendment to a pending product liability bill (HR 956). The effect of the vote was to approve the amendment, which requires lawyers in federal litigation to formally explain their billing procedures to clients at the beginning and end of a case.
NEWS
September 23, 2012
Baltimore's Fraternal Order of Police is celebrating what is, at most, a Pyrrhic victory in its effort to reverse the pension reforms Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and the City Council enacted two years ago. Federal Judge Marvin J. Garbis' ruling that a key provision of the reform plan was unconstitutional appears to mean that the entire law has been struck down. But his ruling also made clear that the vast majority of the provisions in the law are permissible and that even in the part he objected to, a slight change in the plan's design could meet the city's fiscal objectives without violating the Constitution.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2012
The Maryland attorney general's office argued in a lengthy legal brief, filed in the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, that a convicted child rapist serving four life terms should not be offered a second chance to take a plea deal years after the fact, despite a U.S. district court ruling demanding just that. "The district court erred," Assistant Attorney General Edward Kelley wrote in the 56-page document. He was referring to a finding that the constitutional rights of John Joseph Merzbacher, an English teacher at the South Baltimore Catholic Community middle school in the 1970s, were violated because his attorneys failed to inform him of a plea deal before his 1995 trial on child rape and sexual abuse charges.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.