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By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2013
Farming advocates are pressing Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski to reverse a little-noticed measure approved by Congress last month that rescinded tough new rules on the poultry industry - a move that has strained the already rocky relationship between mom-and-pop chicken farmers on the Eastern Shore and Salisbury-based Perdue. Under lobbying from the poultry industry, Congress quietly rolled back U.S. Department of Agriculture regulations that required chicken companies to give contract farmers 90 days' notice before yanking their business, mandated independent testing of scales used to weigh certain birds, and prohibited unfair or discriminatory business practices.
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FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | July 14, 2014
Two dozen protesters were arrested in Washington Monday after they blocked entrances to the federal commission reviewing a proposed natural gas export terminal and liquefaction plant in Southern Maryland. Protesters opposed to exporting liquefied natural gas through Cove Point in Lusby sat down in front of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission 's headquarters. Some held signs, including one calling the agency the "Fracking Expansion Rubberstamp Commission" and another warning that the project was "risky business.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mark Harrington and Mark Harrington,newsday | April 3, 2000
Federal regulations aimed at protecting children's online privacy take effect this month, forcing Web sites that cater to kids younger than age 13 to get parental permission before they collect personal information about children who visit them online. The sites must state in plain language what information they're gathering, and what they plan to do with it. But the regulations -- the first Internet privacy rules overseen by a federal agency, in this case, the Federal Trade Commission -- are going into effect at a time of heightened public concern about secret poaching of personal data on the Internet.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | April 10, 2014
A top Environmental Protection Agenc y official visited Baltimore Thursday to make the case for a new federal rule spelling out what streams and wetlands enjoy legal protection from development or disturbance. Nancy K. Stoner, acting assistant EPA administrator for water, joined activists from Environment Maryland at Fells Point to defend the recently proposed "Waters of the U.S. " rule, which has come under fire from home builders, farmers and other industry groups. Stoner said the EPA and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineer s jointly drafted the rule, which she said was meant to clear up legal confusion left by a pair of Supreme Court decisions about when landowners need federal permits to disturb streams and wetlands.
BUSINESS
Eileen AMbrose | August 28, 2012
The Des Moines Register reports that a 68-year-old Vietnam veteran was fired from his Wells Fargo Home Mortgage job because 49 years ago he put a cardboard dime slug into a laundromat's washing machine. The paper said federal regulations now prohibit banks from hiring people convicted of certain crimes. This was supposed to root out bad actors at the top, but banks have been firing low-level workers. According to the Register, Iowa's Republican Senator Chuck Grassley released a statement that said in part: “On the face of it, these situations seem unfair.”  Ya think?
SPORTS
December 27, 1991
Large numbers of live decoys are being used on private and state lands in Maryland, in violation of federal regulations, the Department of Natural Resources announced yesterday.Live decoys are free-flying, captive-reared waterfowl that are released to attract wild birds. "Some birds, because of their rearing conditions, are reluctant to leave an area once they settle. In doing so, they attract other live waterfowl, making them easy targets for hunters," said DNR secretary Torrey C. Brown.
NEWS
September 6, 1992
If government red tape saps the economy of $400 billion a year, as Dan Quayle calculates, how much is due to his boss, George Bush? In three years, President Bush rang up more federal regulations than did deregulator Ronald Reagan in eight.Sensing the error of his ways in an election year, Mr. Bush turned born-again libertarian. He set a moratorium on new regulations, save those affecting "imminent danger" to the public. The freeze, he said, would save businesses $20 billion a year and protect jobs, a claim he repeated last month while extending the measure another year.
NEWS
March 21, 1995
If Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest is looking thinner these days, it might be because the moderate Republican congressman is being squeezed on both sides in the debate over the Endangered Species Act. On one side, environmental activists demand that he oppose changes in the 22-year-old law. On the other side, right-wing legislators want his help in dismantling the act.Mr. Gilchrest, whose district straddles Chesapeake Bay to include a swath of central Anne Arundel County, would like to take the middle road.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2001
Preservationists concerned about plans to put an emergency communications tower near Ellicott City's historic district filed a complaint with the Federal Communications Commission yesterday, asking for an extension to comment on a public document that they say was - for all intents and purposes - withheld from them. The tower, which the state plans to build and share with Howard County, is part of a communications system upgrade for public safety workers. Officials want to build the 340-foot structure next to District Court, several hundred feet from the historic district.
NEWS
April 7, 1995
Having rallied unanimously against anti-environmental extremism in the House, the Senate is duty bound to stick by its moderate, bipartisan plan to curb excessive government regulation. A joint conference committee is supposed to reconcile House efforts to impose a temporary moratorium on new regulations with the Senate's proposal to give Congress a permanent legislative veto on federal rules over health, safety and pollution. But the differences are so great, so vital, that the more prudent Senate approach ought to prevail.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2013
Farming advocates are pressing Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski to reverse a little-noticed measure approved by Congress last month that rescinded tough new rules on the poultry industry - a move that has strained the already rocky relationship between mom-and-pop chicken farmers on the Eastern Shore and Salisbury-based Perdue. Under lobbying from the poultry industry, Congress quietly rolled back U.S. Department of Agriculture regulations that required chicken companies to give contract farmers 90 days' notice before yanking their business, mandated independent testing of scales used to weigh certain birds, and prohibited unfair or discriminatory business practices.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2013
Baltimore water officials have been dogged in the past year by a series of extremely public problems: widespread billing errors that required millions in refunds, massive water main breaks that closed downtown streets, and a collapsed stormwater culvert that took five months and $7 million to fix. Accompanying those issues has been criticism from customers, many of whom are upset with rising costs and what they see as lapses in service. But city officials say that behind the scenes, they have been making progress on the city's aged and long-deteriorating water system.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2012
Six people have been charged since the start of this month with illegally catching striped bass in federal waters more than three miles off the coast of Ocean City , according to the Maryland Natural Resources Police. Police said the recreational fishers had caught the fish, all more than 28 inches in length, in what is known as the Exclusive Economic Zone - a designated area of waters between 3 and 200 miles off the United States coastline where the federal government holds jurisdiction.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2012
Once promoted as the vanguard of a "nuclear renaissance," a proposed new reactor at the Calvert Cliffs nuclear power plant in Southern Maryland now faces a major new roadblock, with federal regulators threatening to shelve the troubled $9.6 billion project unless the French-controlled developer comes up with a U.S. partner in the next two months. The ruling Thursday by the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board was not unexpected, as the board's parent Nuclear Regulatory Commission had warned Unistar Nuclear Energy more than a year ago that it could not get a license for the Maryland reactor without a U.S. partner.
BUSINESS
Eileen AMbrose | August 28, 2012
The Des Moines Register reports that a 68-year-old Vietnam veteran was fired from his Wells Fargo Home Mortgage job because 49 years ago he put a cardboard dime slug into a laundromat's washing machine. The paper said federal regulations now prohibit banks from hiring people convicted of certain crimes. This was supposed to root out bad actors at the top, but banks have been firing low-level workers. According to the Register, Iowa's Republican Senator Chuck Grassley released a statement that said in part: “On the face of it, these situations seem unfair.”  Ya think?
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2012
Federal securities regulators allege an executive at Eastern Savings Bank in Hunt Valley participated in a fraudulent short-selling scheme involving his personal brokerage firm, according to a complaint filed Monday. In an administrative case, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission said that Chicago-based optionsXpress, four of the firm's officials and Jonathan I. Feldman, a senior vice president at Eastern Savings, violated SEC rules by engaging in a plan to profit off a series of "sham" transactions designed to give the impression that the firm had bought certain securities.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Alex. Brown Inc. Chairman A. B. Krongard told a congressional subcommittee yesterday that securities laws must be overhauled to prevent the United States' share of the world's equity market from declining further.Mr. Krongard, who testified on behalf of the Securities Industry Association, a trade group representing brokerage firms, mutual funds and investment bankers, said laws enacted by states duplicate federal regulations and stifle capital-raising efforts in the United States.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2010
Five former ESPN Zone employees filed a class action lawsuit Monday against the company, alleging it had violated federal standards for notifying and paying workers who lost their jobs when the Inner Harbor location closed in June. The federal lawsuit claims that ESPN Zone, owned by Walt Disney Co., did not provide laid-off workers the mandated 60 days' notice of termination under the federal Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification, or WARN, Act. The company has previously stated that it followed the federal regulations.
NEWS
February 8, 2012
Recently, Cardinal-designateEdwin F. O'Brienwrote a stirring letter to all those who worship in the Baltimore Archdiocese, calling on their help to "regain our religious freedom. " The impassioned call to arms suggests the federal government has dealt a "heavy blow" to Catholics and has "cast aside" the First Amendment. What could have so angered the 72-year-old soon-to-be advisor to the pope to justify his call for prayer and fasting until "religious liberty" is restored? Remarkably, it was the recent decision of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Servicesthat requires future health insurance policies, including those administered by religious hospitals and charities, to cover contraception and sterilization.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2012
- Federal regulations intended to clean the Chesapeake Bay will create hundreds of thousands of jobs in construction and monitoring, according to a report to be released Tuesday by a leading environmental group. Spending on sewage and storm-water treatment alone could support about 230,000 jobs in the region over the next 14 years, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation report found. That spending will be necessary to meet U.S. Environmental Protection Agency requirements to reduce pollution in the bay. The report comes as a debate rages in Washington over whether environmental and other regulations hurt the economy.
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