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By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau | October 31, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Democratic Rep. Tom McMillen has spent more than a million dollars on his 1st District election campaign -- four times more than his Republican opponent, Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest, federal records show.Mr. McMillen, the three-term congressman from Anne Arundel County, had spent $1.1 million as of Oct. 14 in the neck-and-neck race for the 1st District seat, according to a report released yesterday by the Federal Election Commission.Mr. Gilchrest, a freshman lawmaker from Kent County, spent $256,000 through mid-October, the records show.
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NEWS
By Candy Thomson and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2013
Widely used but little acknowledged, the railroad crossing at Hollins Ferry Road just outside the Baltimore Beltway in Halethorpe is an accident waiting to happen, according to the Federal Railroad Administration. It almost claimed Colleen Zaccagnino and her 3-year-old twins last September. "It wasn't making a sound," the Linthicum resident said, recalling the freight train that suddenly loomed in the window of her Honda Pilot as she crossed the tracks. "There was no warning.
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NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2002
When a former investment manager who admitted running a trading scheme that caused more than $27 million in losses was sentenced during the summer to home detention, Maryland's U.S. attorney said he would appeal for jail time to send the message that his office would not go easy on white-collar criminals. But the appeal was quietly dropped this fall after government lawyers determined there was little chance for it to succeed. "I think the evaluation correctly reflected the applicable law," U.S. Attorney Thomas M. DiBiagio said last week.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2012
No one could predict in 1940 that World War II was destined to become the deadliest conflict in history, so they couldn't foresee how important the data in the 1940 census might become one day. Information about the lives of U.S. citizens, including those who died in World War II, has been locked away for more than seven decades and is about to be unveiled. And the Howard County Genealogical Society is ready to help people access it. The nation was emerging from the Depression in 1940, the same year that President Franklin D. Roosevelt won an unprecedented third term in office.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 2, 2006
CRAIGSVILLE, W.Va. -- In its drive to foster a more cooperative relationship with mining companies, the Bush administration has decreased major fines for safety violations since 2001, and in nearly half the cases, it has not collected the fines, according to a data analysis by The New York Times. Federal records also show that in the past two years the federal mine safety agency has failed to hand over any delinquent cases to the Treasury Department for further collection efforts, as is supposed to occur after 180 days.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2013
Widely used but little acknowledged, the railroad crossing at Hollins Ferry Road just outside the Baltimore Beltway in Halethorpe is an accident waiting to happen, according to the Federal Railroad Administration. It almost claimed Colleen Zaccagnino and her 3-year-old twins last September. "It wasn't making a sound," the Linthicum resident said, recalling the freight train that suddenly loomed in the window of her Honda Pilot as she crossed the tracks. "There was no warning.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2012
No one could predict in 1940 that World War II was destined to become the deadliest conflict in history, so they couldn't foresee how important the data in the 1940 census might become one day. Information about the lives of U.S. citizens, including those who died in World War II, has been locked away for more than seven decades and is about to be unveiled. And the Howard County Genealogical Society is ready to help people access it. The nation was emerging from the Depression in 1940, the same year that President Franklin D. Roosevelt won an unprecedented third term in office.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2011
Some companies with interests in Maryland have found a new way to show support for Gov. Martin O'Malley: They're contributing tens of thousands of dollars to the Democratic Governors Association. Last December, O'Malley took the helm of the DGA, where as chairman he is charged with raising large sums to elect Democratic governors nationwide. Under his leadership, the group raised a record $11 million during the first six months of this year — including donations from Exelon Corp.
NEWS
By MAURA REYNOLDS and MAURA REYNOLDS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 5, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Gearing up for congressional hearings next week, supporters and critics of Supreme Court nominee Samuel A. Alito Jr., squared off over his federal court record yesterday, with the American Bar Association rating him "well qualified" to sit on the nation's highest court and liberal interest groups denouncing him as "far out of the mainstream." Liberal critics accused him of applying legal principles inconsistently during his 15 years as a federal appellate court judge, using varying rationales to favor big business, presidential authority and causes supported by political conservatives.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | October 22, 1993
SAN FRANCISCO -- In the clearest indication yet of the Clinton administration's willingness to offer broader public access to government information, the National Science Foundation is financing a project that will make corporate filings to the Securities and Exchange Commission available free via a computer network.The decision to support the project, which will provide access to the SEC's on-line data base of financial data from America's public corporations, is a shift away from the federal information policies under Presidents Ronald Reagan and George Bush.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2011
Some companies with interests in Maryland have found a new way to show support for Gov. Martin O'Malley: They're contributing tens of thousands of dollars to the Democratic Governors Association. Last December, O'Malley took the helm of the DGA, where as chairman he is charged with raising large sums to elect Democratic governors nationwide. Under his leadership, the group raised a record $11 million during the first six months of this year — including donations from Exelon Corp.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 2, 2006
CRAIGSVILLE, W.Va. -- In its drive to foster a more cooperative relationship with mining companies, the Bush administration has decreased major fines for safety violations since 2001, and in nearly half the cases, it has not collected the fines, according to a data analysis by The New York Times. Federal records also show that in the past two years the federal mine safety agency has failed to hand over any delinquent cases to the Treasury Department for further collection efforts, as is supposed to occur after 180 days.
NEWS
By MAURA REYNOLDS and MAURA REYNOLDS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 5, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Gearing up for congressional hearings next week, supporters and critics of Supreme Court nominee Samuel A. Alito Jr., squared off over his federal court record yesterday, with the American Bar Association rating him "well qualified" to sit on the nation's highest court and liberal interest groups denouncing him as "far out of the mainstream." Liberal critics accused him of applying legal principles inconsistently during his 15 years as a federal appellate court judge, using varying rationales to favor big business, presidential authority and causes supported by political conservatives.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2002
When a former investment manager who admitted running a trading scheme that caused more than $27 million in losses was sentenced during the summer to home detention, Maryland's U.S. attorney said he would appeal for jail time to send the message that his office would not go easy on white-collar criminals. But the appeal was quietly dropped this fall after government lawyers determined there was little chance for it to succeed. "I think the evaluation correctly reflected the applicable law," U.S. Attorney Thomas M. DiBiagio said last week.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | October 22, 1993
SAN FRANCISCO -- In the clearest indication yet of the Clinton administration's willingness to offer broader public access to government information, the National Science Foundation is financing a project that will make corporate filings to the Securities and Exchange Commission available free via a computer network.The decision to support the project, which will provide access to the SEC's on-line data base of financial data from America's public corporations, is a shift away from the federal information policies under Presidents Ronald Reagan and George Bush.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau | October 31, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Democratic Rep. Tom McMillen has spent more than a million dollars on his 1st District election campaign -- four times more than his Republican opponent, Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest, federal records show.Mr. McMillen, the three-term congressman from Anne Arundel County, had spent $1.1 million as of Oct. 14 in the neck-and-neck race for the 1st District seat, according to a report released yesterday by the Federal Election Commission.Mr. Gilchrest, a freshman lawmaker from Kent County, spent $256,000 through mid-October, the records show.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, Shashank Bengali and David S. Cloud, Tribune Newspapers | June 10, 2013
Edward Joseph Snowden, the government contractor who revealed the National Security Agency's massive telephone- and Internet-surveillance program, has left few public clues about his life growing up in Crofton and Ellicott City. Snowden, 29, attended Anne Arundel County public schools until leaving Arundel High midway through the 1998-1999 academic year, a district spokesman said Monday. He went on to take courses at the county's community college for the next half-dozen years but never received a degree, according to officials there.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | August 22, 2003
Federal authorities said yesterday that they have dismantled a tightly run, highly profitable marijuana ring on Baltimore's west side, indicting 32 people and seeking forfeiture of some $52 million that investigators say the group made over the past five years selling top-grade pot. The charges announced by the U.S. attorney for Maryland Thomas M. DiBiagio reach every level of the organization, from its suppliers in New York to its alleged local leader,...
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