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By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2011
Commuters who take the MARC Train can likely expect reduced service Wednesday morning. The Maryland Transit Administration said Tuesday trains could be delayed because there are not enough train engineers and conductors to work. Tuesday's earthquake caused severe delays on the Penn, Brunswick and Camden lines. Service was temporarily halted and then operated at reduced speeds once service resumed, meaning long hours for the workers. The Federal Railroad Administration requires train engineers and conductors receive a minimum rest period between work shifts.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2013
Months after a CSX train collided with a truck in Rosedale, triggering an explosion felt around the region, a crash that killed two in Baltimore last week again raised questions about the safety of the state's railroad crossings. Nationally, Maryland has one of the lowest rates of fatal crashes between trains and vehicles at grade crossings. But the crossing on Hollins Ferry Road near Paca Street - where a man and a woman were killed when their SUV was struck by a MARC train early Tuesday - is considered the state's second-most dangerous.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2013
Months after a CSX train collided with a truck in Rosedale, triggering an explosion felt around the region, a crash that killed two in Baltimore last week again raised questions about the safety of the state's railroad crossings. Nationally, Maryland has one of the lowest rates of fatal crashes between trains and vehicles at grade crossings. But the crossing on Hollins Ferry Road near Paca Street - where a man and a woman were killed when their SUV was struck by a MARC train early Tuesday - is considered the state's second-most dangerous.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2013
Widely used but little acknowledged, the railroad crossing at Hollins Ferry Road just outside the Baltimore Beltway in Halethorpe is an accident waiting to happen, according to the Federal Railroad Administration. It almost claimed Colleen Zaccagnino and her 3-year-old twins last September. "It wasn't making a sound," the Linthicum resident said, recalling the freight train that suddenly loomed in the window of her Honda Pilot as she crossed the tracks. "There was no warning.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2013
A column of smoke rose into the sky as firefighters raced to the scene of the train derailment. The earth heaved as an explosion rattled residents and pushed windowpanes from their frames. At least one tank car was on fire - no one was sure what else. It happened Tuesday in Rosedale and it happened on July 18, 2001, when the Howard Street Tunnel beneath the city shook violently and chemical-laden cars belched toxic fumes for days. Little has changed in nearly a dozen years. The rails and highways that crisscross the crowded metro area still carry a daily stream of poisons and explosives.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Staff Writer | September 24, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Transportation Secretary Federico F. Pena told a gathering of railroad executives, union leaders and government regulators yesterday that Wednesday's train wreck should not become a roadblock in efforts to bring high-speed train travel to the United States.While pointing out that passenger trains remain one of the safest modes of transportation, Mr. Pena said Wednesday's crash in Saraland, Ala., that killed more than 40 people was a "very sad moment" in railroad history.But he said it should serve as a reminder that safety must be of paramount concern if the United States is to enter into high-speed rail transportation.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2013
Widely used but little acknowledged, the railroad crossing at Hollins Ferry Road just outside the Baltimore Beltway in Halethorpe is an accident waiting to happen, according to the Federal Railroad Administration. It almost claimed Colleen Zaccagnino and her 3-year-old twins last September. "It wasn't making a sound," the Linthicum resident said, recalling the freight train that suddenly loomed in the window of her Honda Pilot as she crossed the tracks. "There was no warning.
NEWS
October 7, 2004
On October 2, 2004, WILLIAM H. SCHMIDT, age 90, of Washington, DC, formerly of Baltimore, MD. He is survived by his wife Alice, his son Peter, and his daughter Carolyn. Mr. Schmidt was retired from the Federal Railroad Administration and had earlier been an officer of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. Services will be private. In lieu of flowers, donations may be sent to the American Cancer Society, 1875 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 703, Washington, DC, 20009.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Sun Staff Writer | April 9, 1995
The Williamsport school bus tragedy raised awareness of the lack of safety at railroad crossings 60 years ago, but the problem continues to this day.Six hundred ten people died and 1,923 were injured in 4,921 vehicle-train wrecks last year in the United States, according to preliminary figures compiled by the Federal Railroad Administration. In addition, 529 people died and 450 were hurt by trains while trespassing on railroad property.The U.S. Department of Transportation last month launched a safety campaign dubbed, "Always Expect a Train."
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1996
~TC Maryland transportation officials said yesterday they will turn more train windows into emergency exits and take other steps to improve rail safety in the wake of a fatal crash in February.Maryland Rail Commuter (MARC) workers have inspected all emergency exit windows, replacing defective ones, and will equip dozens of other windows for emergency use by February, said John A. Agro, administrator of the Mass Transit Administration.The measures are in response to the Feb. 16 crash of Amtrak and MARC trains in Silver Spring that killed 11 people on the MARC train.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2013
A column of smoke rose into the sky as firefighters raced to the scene of the train derailment. The earth heaved as an explosion rattled residents and pushed windowpanes from their frames. At least one tank car was on fire - no one was sure what else. It happened Tuesday in Rosedale and it happened on July 18, 2001, when the Howard Street Tunnel beneath the city shook violently and chemical-laden cars belched toxic fumes for days. Little has changed in nearly a dozen years. The rails and highways that crisscross the crowded metro area still carry a daily stream of poisons and explosives.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2011
Commuters who take the MARC Train can likely expect reduced service Wednesday morning. The Maryland Transit Administration said Tuesday trains could be delayed because there are not enough train engineers and conductors to work. Tuesday's earthquake caused severe delays on the Penn, Brunswick and Camden lines. Service was temporarily halted and then operated at reduced speeds once service resumed, meaning long hours for the workers. The Federal Railroad Administration requires train engineers and conductors receive a minimum rest period between work shifts.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Staff Writer | September 24, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Transportation Secretary Federico F. Pena told a gathering of railroad executives, union leaders and government regulators yesterday that Wednesday's train wreck should not become a roadblock in efforts to bring high-speed train travel to the United States.While pointing out that passenger trains remain one of the safest modes of transportation, Mr. Pena said Wednesday's crash in Saraland, Ala., that killed more than 40 people was a "very sad moment" in railroad history.But he said it should serve as a reminder that safety must be of paramount concern if the United States is to enter into high-speed rail transportation.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 16, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- The federal chief of railroad safety in the West abruptly canceled an inspection of Southern Pacific freight cars after a company official complained that a previous inspection -- which found chronic locomotive defects -- had hurt the carrier financially.H. T. "Tom" Paton, regional director of the Federal Railroad Administration, said he called off the June 23 inspection at Colton, Calif., even though four agency reviews earlier in the month found that 83 percent of Southern Pacific's locomotives were defective.
NEWS
By CAROLINE ZAAYER | January 3, 2006
News footage of derailed trains crumpled and scattered across the tracks might be impressive to look at, but such wrecks represent a small fraction of all train derailments. In Maryland the most common type of train accident between 2001 and 2004 was a derailment in which the train was moving less than 10 mph and caused no injuries, according to a Capital News Service analysis of Federal Railroad Administration data. The number of such low-speed derailments has been rising in Maryland - from 10 in 2001 to 26 in 2004 - according to the data.
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