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By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley and state lawmakers for the first time dipped into a $100 million fund set aside to deal with the impact of the federal sequester, lessening the blow of automatic federal spending cuts on the state's poor and elderly. O'Malley announced Wednesday that a legislative committee approved his request to spend $9 million on programs that used to be paid for by the federal government, including meals for senior citizens and early childhood education for low-income children.
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NEWS
March 17, 2014
I found The Sun's blandly congratulatory tone in its recent editorial regarding the new federal housing Rental Assistance Demonstration program profoundly disturbing ( "An opportunity for Baltimore's public housing residents," March 10). The editorial, which applauded the Housing Authority's decision to sell more than a third of its 11,000 public housing units to private developers in order to finance $300 million in capital improvements, ignored some fundamental truths. The RAD is not only a last-resort expedient, given the magnitude of Baltimore's housing needs, but to the degree that the program represents a huge new step in the direction of privatizing public housing, it signals yet again the fact that as a society we are moving further and further away from honoring our nation's housing policy goal of a decent house and suitable living environment for every American family.
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NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | May 7, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Amid growing signs that a balanced-budget constitutional amendment could be approved this year, the Bush administration's budget director challenged the Democratic-controlled Congress yesterday to eliminate the $400 billion federal budget deficit by capping spending on mandatory federal programs.Richard G. Darman, director of the Office of Management and Budget, said that such a cap, coupled with a strong economic growth program, could eliminate the deficit and create a surplus as early as 1997.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
The Baltimore Housing Authority's plan to sell 22 of its 28 apartment and townhouse complexes drew dozens of concerned tenants and workers Wednesday to a City Council committee hearing. Floyd Vines, a resident at J. Van Story Branch high-rise, one of the properties to be sold, said Maryland leaders should petition Congress to restore its investment in the public housing, rather than turn to private developers to provide a cash infusion. Under the plan announced last week, the Housing Authority will sell nearly 40 percent of its properties to private developers as a way to raise more than $300 million in renovations and upgrades to the aging complexes that need new elevators, heating and cooling systems and modern kitchens and bathrooms.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | March 3, 2013
Those of you paying attention have noticed that the Obama administration is actually doing what it promised: transforming America into a gigantic welfare state. And there are plenty of takers willing to cash in on it and "get mine. " Numbers don't lie. Forty percent of the population was on some form of public assistance when the president took office; today, that number stands at 55 percent. And fraud is rampant. "Exhibit A" is the Social Security Disability Insurance program (SSDI)
BUSINESS
By John M. Moran and John M. Moran,The Hartford Courant | April 25, 2004
Never mind books that promise to help you get government money. Now you can get a comprehensive online analysis of your eligibility for federal aid. The site is called www.govbenefits.gov. As the name suggests, it's all about finding government benefits you might be eligible to receive. You can search by specific government program (disaster relief, for example) or by personal circumstance (low income, military veteran, farmer, etc.) Or you can search through the entire catalog of state and federal programs.
NEWS
November 16, 2011
It is imperative that we raise revenue in addition to cutting waste in existing federal programs. The following three actions would wipe out our debt over a period of only a few years without having to cut Social Security, Medicare or Medicaid programs: 1. Raise federal income tax rates on those earning $500,000 or more per year. 2. Levy a small tax on every stock market transaction. 3. Deduct Social Security payments from everyone's payroll for the entire year with no maximum limit on how much would be deducted during the year.
NEWS
By Steven Schwalm | October 21, 1992
ONE of the most self-serving arguments against congressional term limits -- usually advanced by long-standing members -- is that it will end the careers of the lawmakers with the most clout: those who know best how to "get things done" for their constituents. Accepting that argument is a costly mistake.As James Payne demonstrates in "The Culture of Spending," what incumbents do best is spend money. Indeed, the longer members remain in Congress, the more inclined they are to support increased federal spending.
NEWS
August 14, 2013
As The Sun recently noted, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a report explaining that obesity rates in the nation have declined ("Tide may be turning on U.S. childhood obesity - CDC," Aug. 6). Hooray! But if you look beneath that shiny veneer here in Maryland, you'll find that the glass is really half full. It's true that our state's obesity rate in low-income preschoolers, after decades of rising, began to level off from 2003 through 2008 and is now showing small declines.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 11, 1995
GALESBURG, Ill. -- President Clinton, seeking to regain the offensive in his battle with the Republican-led Congress, journeyed to the nation's midsection to appeal for public support for his "middle class bill of rights."Mr. Clinton asked a small-town audience yesterday to remember that some federal programs are worth keeping, despite the enthusiasm of his GOP critics for budget-cutting. "There are still problems for the federal government to solve," he said, citing the relief effort that followed the disastrous 1993 floods that ravaged the Midwest.
NEWS
October 14, 2013
Susan Reimer 's thoughtful column ("How much are they worth to you?" Oct. 9) reminded this reader how fortunate my Baby Boom generation has been that the federal government provides so many services for our elderly parents. Without them, we would have long ago had to start making even more agonizing choices between pursuing our dreams and caring for Mom and Dad. These programs have made us all, boomers and the World War II generation, much freer in our personal lives. Conservatives often deride federal programs like Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid, and the state programs that supplement them, as "entitlement programs," implying that the increased government power and taxes necessary to run them somehow make us less free.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley and state lawmakers for the first time dipped into a $100 million fund set aside to deal with the impact of the federal sequester, lessening the blow of automatic federal spending cuts on the state's poor and elderly. O'Malley announced Wednesday that a legislative committee approved his request to spend $9 million on programs that used to be paid for by the federal government, including meals for senior citizens and early childhood education for low-income children.
NEWS
August 14, 2013
As The Sun recently noted, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a report explaining that obesity rates in the nation have declined ("Tide may be turning on U.S. childhood obesity - CDC," Aug. 6). Hooray! But if you look beneath that shiny veneer here in Maryland, you'll find that the glass is really half full. It's true that our state's obesity rate in low-income preschoolers, after decades of rising, began to level off from 2003 through 2008 and is now showing small declines.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2013
Maryland institutions have increased their lending to small business under a federal program by nearly $337.7 million since the low point of the recession, the U.S. Department of the Treasury announced Tuesday. Nationally, banks raised their lending through the Small Business Lending Fund by $9 billion since the recession, the department said. The Treasury's initial survey of the program estimated that 38,000 additional loans have been made as of the end of last year. The program provides capital to institutions that, in turn, see the interest or dividends they pay for those funds reduced the more they lend to small businesses.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2013
Enrollment in a controversial program that provides free cell phone service to low-income families has increased faster in Maryland than any other state in the nation, jumping nearly 90-fold since 2008 — renewing scrutiny on Capitol Hill over its management. The Lifeline program, created in 1984 to soften the impact of telephone deregulation on low-income families, had nearly 509,000 subscribers in the state last year, up from 5,821 in 2008. Growth in Maryland was nearly 40 times greater than the national average.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2013
When officials in Washington evaluate the consequences of the sequester, Tiara Bland wants them to consider the sixth-grade girls at Mother Seton Academy. Bland, a 22-year-old AmeriCorps member at the Baltimore academy for low-income children, said the decision by government leaders to impose across-the-board spending cuts will shortchange the urban youths who turn to her for advice on math problems and life. Bland, who aspires to be a school psychologist, is one of 17 AmeriCorps members performing education and literacy work in Baltimore for the Notre Dame Mission Volunteers.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 17, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration denounced a major element yesterday of the House Republicans' welfare bill, which would replace most federal food and nutrition programs with cash grants to be administered by the states.The administration said the Republican proposal would cut at least $5.2 billion -- almost 13 percent -- from the $40.8 billion that would otherwise be spent on food assistance next year.In a report analyzing the bill, the Agriculture Department said yesterday that the Republican proposal also would eliminate "all uniform nutrition standards" now set by the federal government for school lunches, the Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children, and other food programs.
NEWS
October 14, 2013
Susan Reimer 's thoughtful column ("How much are they worth to you?" Oct. 9) reminded this reader how fortunate my Baby Boom generation has been that the federal government provides so many services for our elderly parents. Without them, we would have long ago had to start making even more agonizing choices between pursuing our dreams and caring for Mom and Dad. These programs have made us all, boomers and the World War II generation, much freer in our personal lives. Conservatives often deride federal programs like Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid, and the state programs that supplement them, as "entitlement programs," implying that the increased government power and taxes necessary to run them somehow make us less free.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2013
When Nancy Aiken talks to students in Baltimore's Orthodox Jewish community about domestic violence and sexual assaults, she asks the boys a simple question: How many of you want to grow up to be a perpetrator of violence? Aiken knows the students mean it when they say, 'No, not me.' But she also knows, statistically, that some will, indeed, become wife beaters or sexual predators. "There is only so much we can do to train our young women how not to be victims," said Aiken, executive director of the Counseling, Helpline and Aid Network for Abused Women, or CHANA.
NEWS
By Alan Guttman | March 5, 2013
Now that sequestration is upon us, our nation's leaders continue to debate which federal programs provide the best bang for the buck. When they ask how effective Head Start is, many legislators have cited the Head Start Impact Study. It concludes that although Head Start consistently closes the achievement gap and prepares many of America's poorest and neediest children for kindergarten, by third grade most children across the nation outperform and outscore children who attend Head Start.
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