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By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | February 15, 2009
We've all seen it on TV: A criminal is convicted and immediately led out of the courtroom, usually in handcuffs, and on to prison. That's the way the justice system works, right? Not always. When it comes to white-collar crime, federal judges and even prosecutors can seem a little soft on sentencing and detention, allowing convicted criminals relatively liberal latitude in when they begin serving time. In some cases, it can take months before a criminal is made to report for prison.
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NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,Sun Reporter | July 2, 2008
Former state Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell, who pleaded guilty to a federal bribery charge last year, reported to a federal prison yesterday to begin serving a seven-year sentence, according to a Bureau of Prisons spokesman. Bromwell, a Democrat, arrived about 2 p.m. at Devens Federal Medical Center in north-central Massachusetts. It is a decommissioned military base that houses male inmates who require specialized or long-term medical care, according to the federal Bureau of Prisons Web site.
NEWS
August 3, 1993
CUMBERLAND -- Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett said that a federal prison under construction near Cumberland likely will not be affected by proposed cuts in the Justice Department's budget next year.Cuts in the federal Bureau of Prison's funding for preparing new prisons for inmates are expected to delay the opening of some prisons.But bureau officials assured the 6th District Republican that the $1.2 million slotted for Cumberland will be available on time."It's a go at this point," Mr. Bartlett said.
NEWS
May 3, 2005
Three people - two from Howard County and another from Virginia - have been sentenced to federal prison and ordered to pay back tens of thousands of dollars for their involvement in a real estate investment scheme involving at least 200 properties in Baltimore. The case is part of a crackdown by federal prosecutors on the practice of flipping, in which houses are bought and then quickly resold at inflated prices. The deals are done with false appraisals and paperwork, and the houses are often uninhabitable.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2012
Disgraced collector Barry H. Landau was sentenced Wednesday to seven years in federal prison for stealing thousands of historic documents worth as much as $2.5 million from archives along the East Coast, including one in Baltimore, where the scheme unraveled last summer. The 64-year-old Manhattan resident, who for years fooled celebrities and political players into believing he had significant ties to the White House, was also ordered to pay $46,525 in restitution and to stay away from all archives and libraries after he is released.
NEWS
By David G. Savage and David G. Savage,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 3, 2004
WASHINGTON - In an unusual midsummer order, the Supreme Court said yesterday that it would seek to rule quickly on whether thousands of federal prison sentences were unconstitutional because a judge, not the jury, had decided key facts that called for more time behind bars. The federal criminal courts were thrown into "disarray" by a high court ruling in late June that cast doubt on the traditional way of imposing punishment, Bush administration lawyers complained in an emergency appeal.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | August 13, 1999
The case of a Baltimore drug lord who ordered executions from federal prison is a prime example of how inmates have run deadly criminal enterprises with unfettered access to telephones, a government inquiry has concluded.The Inspector General's Office, an investigative arm of the U.S. Justice Department, accused the Bureau of Prisons of "taking insufficient steps to address this abuse" despite being aware of widespread problems for years."A significant number of federal inmates use prison telephones to commit serious crimes while incarcerated, including murder, drug trafficking and fraud," Inspector General Michael R. Bromwich concluded.
NEWS
By ANDREA F. SIEGEL and ANDREA F. SIEGEL,SUN REPORTER | June 20, 2006
The Virginia prosecutors of snipers Lee Boyd Malvo and John Allen Muhammad say they oppose allowing Malvo to serve his life sentence in a federal prison as part of any far-reaching plea agreement, as has been suggested in recent months. Muhammad, 45, on death row in Virginia for a sniper murder, was convicted in May of six fatal sniper shootings in Montgomery County in 2002. He received six life terms without parole. Malvo, 21, serving multiple life sentences for Virginia sniper shootings, had not spoken publicly about the crimes until Muhammad's trial.
NEWS
By TONY PERRY and TONY PERRY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 4, 2006
SAN DIEGO -- A judge rejected Randall "Duke" Cunningham's tearful bid for mercy yesterday and sentenced the war hero and disgraced former congressman to eight years and four months in federal prison for bribery. Looking thin and haggard, with head downcast, Cunningham listened as U.S. District Judge Larry A. Burns imposed the sentence. "You've undermined the opportunity [that] honest politicians have to do good," Burns said. Burns ordered Cunningham to pay $1.8 million in restitution and refused his request for a week to say goodbye to his family.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2003
As eastern Baltimore County looks toward revitalization, federal officials are considering a proposal to build a privately run prison next to a historic black community and in the path of an ambitious waterfront project. Correctional Services Corp. of Sarasota, Fla., has proposed the 1,750-bed prison just south of the Turners Station neighborhood in Dundalk, a U.S. Department of Justice spokesman confirmed yesterday. News of the proposal has shaken the proud Dundalk area, once the heart of Maryland's steel and shipbuilding industries.
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