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By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2011
A 36-year-old heroin dealer was sentenced to 17 years in federal prison Wednesday after pleading guilty to being a felon in possession of a firearm, announced the Maryland U.S. Attorney's Office. According to prosecutors, Quincy Salliey was handed a baggie full of illegal narcotics on May 27, 2010, while sitting in the passenger side of a vehicle, leading police to investigate, remove Salliey from the car and find the gun: a loaded semi-automatic pistol. Officers also recovered 47 gel caps of heroin and $319 from Salliey, who has four prior drug convictions, and additional rounds from the car, along with $1,930 hidden in the dash.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood | May 6, 2014
Opening arguments began Tuesday in the Annapolis trial of a man accused in a late night shooting nearly six years ago that left an alleged pimp dead and helped unravel a prostitution business in the state's capital city. Ricardo Humberto Rivas-Ramirez was found shot dead in a Cadillac that had rolled down Janwall Street shortly after midnight on Sept. 13, 2008, according to police and prosecutors. Beside him in the passenger's seat was a wounded passenger who police said was a prostitute in his employ.
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | May 10, 2012
A 32-year-old Crofton man was sentenced to 10 years in federal prison Thursday for armed bank robbery, after holding up the same two M&T banks a total of five times and making off with more than $30,000, sometimes wishing the tellers a “nice day” on his way out, according to the Maryland U.S. Attorney's Office. Wearing a hoodie and a neoprene face mask, William Alexander Norbeck burst into an M&T Bank on the 500 block of Solomons Island Road in Prince Frederick in March of last year, racking a 12-gauge, pump-action shotgun and telling everyone to “get down,” according to his plea agreement.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2013
Two years ago, the fate of Anne Arundel County Councilman Daryl Jones was in the hands of a federal judge. The Severn Democrat had pleaded guilty to not filing tax returns, the result of a years-long investigation into his law practice and tavern. Soon, he began a five-month prison sentence, had his law license suspended and was stripped of his seat on the council - with one colleague publicly calling him a liar. Today, Jones has regained his council seat and is aiming to revive a political career that once lay in shambles.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton | December 15, 2011
Baltimore attorney Stanley Needleman, 69, has been sentenced to a year and a day in federal prison by a U.S. District Court judge.  Needleman pleaded guilty in September, four months after agents from the Drug Enforcement Administration raided his downtown law office and Pikesville home and found $1.15 million in unreported income inside two safes. Agents found a ledger detailing the cash payments from his legal clients, prosecutors said. Prosecutors said at sentencing that Needleman had funneled cash into family members accounts and on ttwo occasions cashed checks for over $10,000 for convicted drug traffickers at a local liquor store but did not deposit the monies received.  He also used $30,000 in cash of his own money to post bail for a client in violation Maryland Rules of Professional Conduct, prosecutors said.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2012
Police officers convicted of a crime in Maryland and sentenced to state prison are typically housed in segregated areas for their safety, far from most other inmates. But those prosecuted in U.S. District Court and sent to federal prison - like the 15 Baltimore officers recently convicted in a kickback scheme - will, for the most part, be thrown in with the rest of the convicts. "Whether [inmates are] high profile, law enforcement, whatever the case may be, we aim to treat them like anybody else," said Chris Burke, a spokesman for the Federal Bureau of Prisons.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2013
Former state Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell Sr., who was sentenced to seven years in prison on a federal bribery conviction, has been released into a community reintegration program, the U.S. Bureau of Prisons said Thursday. Leah Ominsky, a prisons official, confirmed that Bromwell, 63, has been released to a residential re-entry program but remains a federal inmate until his sentence is completed. Ominsky declined to say whether Bromwell is being held at a halfway house or what the conditions of his release are. "The idea is a reintegration into society.
NEWS
August 13, 2013
Attorney General Eric H. Holder's plan to reduce overcrowding in federal prisons by instructing federal prosecutors to stop invoking mandatory minimum sentences against low-level, nonviolent drug offenders was a welcome, if overdue, announcement. The policy's chief shortcoming is that Mr. Holder can't, by himself, correct this long-standing problem. That will require intervention by Congress - as well as by legislatures in states where similar problems exist. That the United States locks up too many people for too long is unquestionably true.
NEWS
July 17, 2013
A jury in Florida has found George Zimmerman not guilty of second-degree murder or manslaughter in the death of Trayvon Martin ("Martin verdict protests continue," July 16). Rather than have Attorney General Eric Holder's office pursue charges against someone found not guilty, I would ask that they focus their efforts on lengthening the amount of time those found guilty of violent crimes must serve in prison. Unfortunately, a 17-year-old is dead, but the jury must have believed him to be the aggressor.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | May 18, 2013
If the federal prison that gets Tavon White is anything like the last one I visited, even a charmer such as Bulldog will have a tough time recreating the life of the libertine he had at the Baltimore City Detention Center. White, a reputed leader of the Black Guerrilla Family prison gang, is accused of attempted murder; he's been on trial twice for that charge since 2009. Both trials ended in hung juries, and that explains why White, or "Bulldog," had enough time at the jail to get four of its correctional officers pregnant, one of them twice, according to recent federal indictments.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
A Baltimore contract killer, who was caught telling an undercover FBI agent that he would murder someone for drugs and cash, pleaded guilty Thursday and was sentenced to more than 19 years in federal prison, the U.S. Attorney's office announced.  "There are other hit men like Antonio McKiver who commit drug-related murders in Baltimore," U.S. Attorney Rod Rosenstein said in a news release. "Our challenge is to catch them before the next murder so we don't need to chase them afterwards.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2013
Former state Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell Sr., who was sentenced to seven years in prison on a federal bribery conviction, has been released into a community reintegration program, the U.S. Bureau of Prisons said Thursday. Leah Ominsky, a prisons official, confirmed that Bromwell, 63, has been released to a residential re-entry program but remains a federal inmate until his sentence is completed. Ominsky declined to say whether Bromwell is being held at a halfway house or what the conditions of his release are. "The idea is a reintegration into society.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2012
Police officers convicted of a crime in Maryland and sentenced to state prison are typically housed in segregated areas for their safety, far from most other inmates. But those prosecuted in U.S. District Court and sent to federal prison - like the 15 Baltimore officers recently convicted in a kickback scheme - will, for the most part, be thrown in with the rest of the convicts. "Whether [inmates are] high profile, law enforcement, whatever the case may be, we aim to treat them like anybody else," said Chris Burke, a spokesman for the Federal Bureau of Prisons.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | July 30, 2012
A 46-year-old woman who worked for the Federal Bureau of Prisons was indicted on charges she demanded freebies and perquisites - including meals and spa services - from moving companies in exchange for bureau business, the Maryland U.S. Attorney's Office announced Monday. Susan A. Pratt of Crofton was a supervisor in the “relocation services” section of the BOP, which handled moves for transferred prison employees, according to a six-count indictment returned against her returned last week.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | July 18, 2012
A moving company truck driver, who got into an altercation while on the job then fled police, was sentenced to eight years in federal prison Wednesday for ramming his company truck into several cars on the Baltimore-Washington Parkway, injuring the occupants, including a 10-year-old girl. Michael A. Jasper, 40, of Hanover, was on a job in New Carrollton on March 31, 2010, prosecutors said, when he was “involved in an assault.” He jumped into the moving truck and took off, with Prince George's County Police in pursuit.
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