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NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,States News Service | June 16, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The House approved a 3 percent pay increase for federal workers last night.The pay plan, offered by Rep. Steny H. Hoyer, D-Md., as part of the appropriations bill for the Treasury Department, the U.S. Postal Service and other government agencies, would give the nation's 1.3 million federal workers a 2 percent pay raise and half of their scheduled "locality pay" next year.Locality pay is intended to increase federal-worker salaries in areas where private-sector employees earn higher salaries for comparable work.
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NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2013
The House of Representatives voted Friday to block a half-percent pay raise ordered by President Barack Obama for federal employees, the latest move by GOP lawmakers to trim budget deficits by attempting to cut the size of the government. The proposal, which was approved on a 261-154 vote, would save $11 billion by continuing a two-year-old pay freeze for federal workers through the end of the year. The outcome of the pay dispute will affect about 300,000 federal workers who live in Maryland.
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NEWS
By Carol Emert and Carol Emert,States News Service | May 14, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A House committee voted yesterday to revive "locality" pay for federal workers, which the Clintonadministration wanted to postpone until 1995, and agreed to preserve federal workers' survivors' benefits despite a Clinton proposal to cut them by 10 percent.The House Post Office and Civil Service Committee restored the locality pay, designed to close the gap between federal and private-sector pay, by slashing the federal work force by 150,000 over five years instead of 100,000, eliminating cash performance awards for federal workers for four years and limiting the amount of annual leave carried over by senior executives after this year.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2013
Congressional Republicans are stepping up their rhetoric on federal employee pay, positioning the issue as a central bargaining chip in negotiations next month over raising the debt ceiling and keeping the government open. House GOP leaders will hold a vote this week on legislation to overturn an executive order President Barack Obama signed last month to provide a 0.5 percent pay increase to the federal workforce - the first raise since the administration imposed a government-wide pay freeze in 2010.
NEWS
By Michael K. Burns | March 9, 1991
Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, D-Md., told Social Security Administration employees in Woodlawn yesterday that they would get an 8 percent raise under legislation she introduced to give 130,000 federal workers in the Baltimore-Washington area a cost-of-living differential.The senator said she also had filed a bill to pay more than 10,000 federal employees who served in the active armed forces during the Persian Gulf crisis the difference between their military reserve salary and their regular federal pay."
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau | December 1, 1993
WASHINGTON -- In timing certain to brighten the holiday shopping season, the White House decided yesterday to let a long-awaited 4.23 percent raise for most of Maryland's 271,000 federal workers go into effect in January.The Clinton administration had a deadline of midnight to propose nTC changes in the so-called locality pay raises, which will begin making federal salaries more competitive with private-sector pay in different regions of the country.Rep. Steny H. Hoyer of Maryland said he was told by White House officials yesterday that the Clinton administration will propose no change in the plan.
NEWS
By Carol Emert and Carol Emert,States News Service | April 21, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Despite a tight federal budget, there's a small chance that the 15-year-old pay cap on wage-grade workers could be lifted this year, federal employee advocates say.Federal labor unions and some lawmakers have tried for years to remove the cap, which prevents annual pay raises for blue-collar workers from exceeding those for white-collar, or General Schedule (GS), employees. The cap has been in effect since 1979.The cap has created a growing disparity between public and private sector pay, with one city, Richmond, Va., showing a 32 percent pay gap between public and private sector blue-collar workers, according to information from the Office of Personnel Management.
NEWS
April 19, 1993
Public at risk in corrections policiesI feel compelled to write in reference to the March 23 escape of Randy Eugene McBee from the Eastern Pre-Release Unit, near Church Hill. The way in which this escape was handled by the authorities leaves much to be desired.Apparently, McBee has been practicing crime since the early 1970s, with former convictions for grand larceny, armed robbery and rape. It is also interesting to note that he had previously escaped from at least two other institutions prior to this.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau | May 5, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The lowest-paid federal workers may escape the pay freeze President Clinton wants to impose on them this year, an administration official suggested yesterday.Leon E. Panetta, the federal budget director, said his agency is looking at the possibility of replacing the across-the-board pay freeze with "a more scaled approach," suggesting that employees at the low end of the pay scale may get some sort of raise.Federal pay scales run from just under $12,000 a year to well over $100,000 for agency heads and members of the Cabinet.
NEWS
By Carol Emert and Carol Emert,States News Service | February 26, 1992
Federal agencies are not competing effectively with private companies in job recruitment on college campuses, according to a study by the General Accounting Office.Many students at 40 randomly selected colleges told the GAO that face-to-face contact with recruiters is one of the most important factors in getting them interested in jobs.But the study found the government lags far behind private-sector firms in campus visits.Twenty-one companies visited at least 17 of the 40 schools, while only two federal agencies -- the Internal Revenue Service and the Central Intelligence Agency -- visited 17 campuses.
NEWS
December 8, 2012
Accompanying your story about impending tax hikes and budget cuts was a front-page picture of an Obama supporter complaining about having to work hard at her Social Security job ("On the brink of the 'fiscal cliff,'" Dec. 6). Perhaps she should join the private sector to find out what real work actually is. What you didn't report is whether she and whoever else was protesting had taken personal leave to express their feelings or whether they were "on the clock," so to speak, as they publicly complained about being expected "to do more.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2012
The White House has proposed a modest half-percent pay raise for civilian federal employees beginning next year - a move that would affect thousands of Maryland workers. If the across-the-board raise is approved by Congress, it would end a two-year-old salary freeze imposed as part of belt-tightening in Washington. The proposal comes at a time when congressional Republicans have sought to extend the freeze for at least another year. But several Maryland lawmakers and unions representing employees noted that the proposed increase is far less than inflation and doesn't cover recent increases in health care premiums deducted from paychecks.
NEWS
By Paul West, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2010
More than 200,000 Marylanders are likely to be hit by a two-year pay freeze for federal workers announced Monday by President Barack Obama. The proposal, which appears headed for congressional approval, would affect the state disproportionately: The percentage of Marylanders in civilian federal jobs is three times the national average. The state legislature's top fiscal analyst predicted an "adverse" effect on Maryland's revenue growth. Local economists said a freeze would hurt the state's recovery — and could foreshadow federal job cuts.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,paul.west@baltsun.com | February 2, 2010
WASHINGTON - -President Barack Obama wants to end the nation's troubled program to return astronauts to the moon, but NASA officials indicated Monday that any change was unlikely to mean cutbacks at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland. Obama's $3.8 trillion budget for fiscal 2011, which forecasts a record deficit, includes provisions for increased spending designed to improve the Chesapeake Bay watershed, a 1.4 percent annual pay increase for federal workers and an array of tax and education initiatives that would affect Maryland and the rest of the country, if Congress approves them.
NEWS
By Paul West | paul.west@baltsun.com | February 2, 2010
President Barack Obama wants to end the nation's troubled program to return astronauts to the moon, but NASA officials indicated Monday that any change was unlikely to mean cutbacks at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland. Obama's $3.8 trillion budget for fiscal 2011, which forecasts a record deficit, includes provisions for increased spending designed to improve the Chesapeake Bay watershed, a 1.4 percent annual pay increase for federal workers and an array of tax and education initiatives that would affect Maryland and the rest of the country, if Congress approves them.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 25, 1998
WASHINGTON -- A bipartisan group of Maryland and other Washington-area lawmakers called yesterday for federal employees to be paid salaries comparable to those of their private sector peers, saying that President Clinton has evaded a 1990 law intended to close the gap.Legislation introduced by Rep. Steny H. Hoyer of Southern Maryland and Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes of Baltimore, both Democrats, would allow the president to waive the pay increase needed to narrow...
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 25, 1998
WASHINGTON -- A bipartisan group of Maryland and other Washington-area lawmakers called yesterday for federal employees to be paid salaries comparable to those of their private sector peers, saying that President Clinton has evaded a 1990 law intended to close the gap.Legislation introduced by Rep. Steny H. Hoyer of Southern Maryland and Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes of Baltimore, both Democrats, would allow the president to waive the pay increase needed to narrow...
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Washington Bureau Nelson Schwartz, Karen Hosler, Peter Jensen and David Michael Ettlin contributed to this article | February 18, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Although it contains $57 million for Maryland transportation projects and $300 million for the Woodlawn-based Social Security Administration, President Clinton's economic program is a setback for the more than 300,000 federal workers in Maryland who would have their pay frozen.Another detriment for Maryland is the president's proposal to overhaul the space station program, which could cost the jobs of some of the 125 Marylanders involved in the project.Leaders of federal employee unions reacted angrily to the proposal to freeze the pay of civilian and military workers, cancel a 1994 raise and reduce annual raises in the following three years.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,States News Service | June 16, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The House approved a 3 percent pay increase for federal workers last night.The pay plan, offered by Rep. Steny H. Hoyer, D-Md., as part of the appropriations bill for the Treasury Department, the U.S. Postal Service and other government agencies, would give the nation's 1.3 million federal workers a 2 percent pay raise and half of their scheduled "locality pay" next year.Locality pay is intended to increase federal-worker salaries in areas where private-sector employees earn higher salaries for comparable work.
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