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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 23, 2004
Homeowners can have their Tropical Storm Isabel insurance claims reviewed by federal officials Wednesday in Queen Anne's County and Thursday in Edgewater. During the meetings, National Flood Insurance Program claims specialists will gather information and documentation from property owners to compare with case files from private insurance companies. The specialists may also order a reinspection of the damaged property. Claims specialists will summarize their findings in written statements.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
New technology that could stop or slow a train before an accident - reducing the likelihood of operator errors becoming deadly - will be installed on all MARC trains. The Maryland Board of Public Works approved a $13 million contract on Wednesday to begin installing "positive train control" equipment, which uses GPS and radio signaling to react automatically if a collision or derailment is anticipated. Such a system might have prevented the December derailment of a New York passenger train that came off the tracks as it sped too fast into a turn, killing four and injuring more than 70. It would have prevented the 1996 collision between a MARC train and an Amtrak train in Silver Spring that killed 11 people, according to the National Transportation Safety Board, which investigates all major rail accidents.
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NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Ryan Davis and Stephanie Hanes and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | August 19, 2004
Federal officials have arrested a relative of the two suspects indicted in the beheading of three children in Northwest Baltimore in May, according to law enforcement officials. Victor Espinoza, the father of one of the suspects and the brother of the other, is being held at the Dorchester County Detention Center, officials there said. A spokeswoman for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement declined to discuss Espinoza's situation, including why he was arrested, saying the agency does not talk about cases that may affect other investigations.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
Federal education and justice officials unveiled during a visit to Baltimore on Wednesday the first set of national school discipline guidelines to reduce out-of-school suspensions and address the disproportionate suspension rates of students of color and those with disabilities. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and Attorney General Eric Holder jointly announced the comprehensive package of guidelines at Frederick Douglass High School, the first time the federal government has issued guidance on school discipline.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 21, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court moved into a politically sensitive case yesterday, agreeing to decide a legal question raised by a former prison inmate who tried to make public during the 1988 election campaign his accusation that he sold marijuana to Dan Quayle in the 1970s.The former inmate, Brett C. Kimberlin, released from federal prison early last year, has claimed in a lawsuit that he was unconstitutionally silenced by two Justice Department officials in the Reagan administration. He tried to speak out against Mr. Quayle in the closing stages of the 1988 campaign, when Mr. Quayle, then a senator from Indiana, was seeking the vice presidency on George Bush's presidential ticket.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 17, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration is proposing to scale back inspections of many nursing homes that care for elderly people under Medicaid and Medicare.The Department of Health and Human Services outlined the proposed changes in documents sent recently to federal and state health officials.Government data show that more than two-thirds of nursing homes are not fully complying with federal standards.Federal officials said the proposed changes would allow them to concentrate on homes with serious problems.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | April 3, 1999
State and federal officials involved in drug control efforts promised yesterday to work to cut drug abuse among youths and adult criminal offenders in Maryland by 20 percent over the next eight years.The promise was the centerpiece of a first-in-the-nation partnership agreement signed by Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend and Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey, director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy.The agreement -- which includes no specific promises of additional federal money -- will allow state and federal officials to work together more closely, Townsend said, and will reduce red tape that can hinder drug-fighting efforts.
NEWS
By William J. Broad and William J. Broad,New York Times News Service | October 19, 1992
Federal officials say a two-year inquiry has found evidence that the makers of the mirror for the $1.5 billion Hubble Space Telescope hid important clues to the flaw that has crippled the most complex and costly scientific instrument ever put into space.The makers of the 8-foot mirror deny any wrongdoing, saying the government was fully informed of all data for judging whether the telescope's main light-gathering mirror had imperfections.But federal officials say NASA's inspector general has uncovered evidence suggesting that the contractor may be liable for damages.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | October 14, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The proposed merger of Bell Atlantic Corp. and the nation's largest cable-television company faces government inquiries that could keep the deal under a legal cloud for years -- with no guarantee of official approval.Within hours of yesterday's announcement of the huge corporate union -- valued at $30 billion or more -- federal officials were questioning the impact on consumers and competitors. One key legislator criticized the deal as a "double whammy" for consumers."This will test the mettle of the Clinton administration in a very early and dramatic way," said Andrew Schwartzman, a communications industry legal analyst and head of the Media Access Project.
NEWS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | September 19, 1991
The City of Annapolis has filed suit against state and federal officials to block construction of the controversial new Severn River bridge at the U.S. Naval Academy.The papers, filed yesterday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, asked a federal judge to hold a preliminary injunction hearing within 10 days.The suit claims that the new bridge would destroy the aesthetics of the Colonial Annapolis Historic District in violation of the National Historic Preservation Act.It also claims that attempts to build the new bridge violate numerous state and federal laws, and that the defendants failed to "adequately" consider such things as the historic and environmental impact in approving plans for it.The Schaefer administration plans to replace the current drawbridge on Md. 450, which was built in 1924, with a much higher structure that many residents sharply oppose.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2014
The economy is likely to continue dragging in a slow recovery this year, the president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond told a Maryland bankers group Friday. The economy will grow an estimated 2 percent to 2.25 percent, about the same as since the end of the recession, said Jeffrey M. Lacker, whose Federal Reserve district includes Baltimore. Last year ended on a positive note, with improvements in measures such as consumer spending and gross domestic product, the value of the nation's goods and services, he said.
NEWS
By Amy Bennett and Angela Canterbury | August 7, 2013
We already know that federal regulators have undermined accountability for abuses by mortgage servicing companies. In another disturbing development, the Federal Reserve and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) are refusing to turn over information to members of Congress that could help them prevent such abuses from happening again. A recent study of the Independent Foreclosure Review process by the Government Accountability Office (GAO) cited significant flaws, including a lack of transparency, in the design and implementation of the process.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2013
A federal grand jury indicted 18 alleged gang members on racketeering charges, including a detainee at a state-managed detention center, news that could draw more scrutiny to Maryland's beleaguered correctional system. Federal officials say the members of the Bloods, most of them operating out of Howard County, broke into houses, stole money and other items, and sold drugs, including oxycodone, ecstasy and marijuana. Eighteen Bloods members were charged with racketeering, and three others not in the gang were charged with selling drugs, federal officials said.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2013
A tour bus company with headquarters in Maryland has been shut down by federal safety officials after an investigation determined its drivers and vehicles pose an imminent hazard to public safety. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Wednesday ordered Washington DC Party Shuttle, which also does business as Onboard DC Tours, to immediately cease all operations for "egregious" violations that demonstrated "blatant disregard for motor coach passenger safety. " The bus company has offices at National Harbor in Prince George's County and operates primarily as a tour bus service in the Washington metropolitan area, New York City and Las Vegas.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2012
Long lines that caused voters in Maryland and several other states to wait hours at polling places on Election Day are prompting a push for new laws to speed the process of casting a ballot. Lawmakers in Congress and the Maryland General Assembly say they are considering a broad range of ideas, such as increasing the number of early voting centers available in high-population jurisdictions and offering federal grants to states that find ways to streamline the voting process. Maryland election officials are investigating complaints about wait times in the Nov. 6 election, including reports that some people waited for hours despite lower-than-expected turnout.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2012
With its dandelions, clover and discarded cigarette butts, the little "bioswale" in front of the Salvation Army community center in West Baltimore won't win any lawn-care prizes. But the shallow, weedy depression collects rainfall washing off an acre of litter-strewn pavement and filters out pollution that otherwise would foul the harbor. City officials and nonprofit leaders took federal environmental officials on a whirlwind tour Tuesday of Franklin Square to show them how they're trying to clean the ailing harbor by greening the blighted neighborhoods that drain into it. The keys to healthier waters, they explained, lie in improving the quality of life of the people who live by those waters.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | November 18, 2008
Maryland's senators are seeking answers from federal law enforcement, homeland security and intelligence officials about any information-sharing and contacts with the Maryland State Police regarding a spying operation that mistakenly identified protesters as terrorists in state and federal databases. In a letter yesterday, Sens. Benjamin L. Cardin and Barbara A. Mikulski, both Democrats, noted that cooperation among federal, state and local agencies is "critical" to national security. Nonetheless, they wrote, participants in nonviolent demonstrations should not end up in terrorism databases.
NEWS
By JOSH GETLIN AND JOSH MEYER and JOSH GETLIN AND JOSH MEYER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 8, 2005
NEW YORK -- As New Yorkers coped yesterday with a new and specific threat against the city's subway system, they also wrestled with a troubling question: Why did federal officials continue to play down the seriousness of the threat that Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg said required a major increase in subway security? Less than 24 hours after Bloomberg made a late-afternoon announcement of an "imminent" subway bombing plot, the nation's largest transit system was operating smoothly, New York City officials said.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2012
Andrew York hopes to bring better health services to desperately poor Native Americans when he's done earning dual degrees in law and pharmacy from the University of Maryland, Baltimore. But he might not be able to afford that modest-paying career path if not for federal programs designed to forgive part of his $65,000 in college loans. York told his story at a UMB forum Tuesday to discuss federal plans for making college more affordable. The afternoon event featured U.S. Under Secretary of Education Martha J. Kanter, U.S. Rep. John Sarbanes and students and officials from the university.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2011
State and local officials joined Shaun Donovan, the nation's top housing official, on a tour Friday of construction efforts that they hope will give residents of a blighted corner of West Baltimore affordable and environmentally minded housing. The development, which aims to renovate or build 111 low-income apartments by the end of this year, is in the Poppleton neighborhood, where boarded-up buildings sit alongside tidy, well-kept homes. The Department of Housing and Urban Development provided $1.5 million of federal stimulus funding to outfit apartments in the development with features that include double-pane windows, cabinets free of formaldehyde and energy-efficient appliances.
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