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NEWS
May 6, 2014
In response to former Anne Arundel County Executive John Leopold's letter ( "Leopold: June primary a self-serving move by Democrats," May 2), I am sure Mr. Leopold remembers from his days as a legislator that one of the most important responsibilities of a lawmaker is to ensure that state law complies with, and does not conflict with, federal law. As he is also aware, the Military and Overseas Voter Empowerment Act required states to move their...
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NEWS
September 28, 2014
McKenzie Elliott, the 3-year-old shot to death in Baltimore, is a recent victim of misguided drug laws ( "Politicians, churchmen talk policing in Northwest Baltimore ," Sept. 9). While I do not support open use of "illegal drugs," I do not find that drug sales or use represent a criminal act. Drug use has long been regarded as a "disabling condition" under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act. Federal and state law should not superimpose criminal penalties on the known disabled in direct contradiction to the specific intent in these two federal statutes.
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EXPLORE
October 18, 2012
What seems to be missing from Calvin Ball's piece Oct. 11 column on the Dream Act, and also seems to be missing from the discussion of this act overall, is the fact that the Maryland Dream Act directly contradicts the legal intent of an already existing federal law. On September 28, 1996 U.S. Sen. Alan Simpson said, on the floor of the U.S. Senate, "Illegal aliens will no longer be eligible for reduced in-state college tuition. It is in there. " On that day, the Senate had just passed an immigration reform law that contained a provision that would become part of the United States Code,Title 8, section 1623, saying in part, "an alien who is not lawfully present in the United States shall not be eligible on the basis of residence within a State (or a political subdivision)
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
The furor over former Raven Ray Rice thrust the issue of domestic violence into the spotlight, but it also highlighted a part of football that fans likely spend little time thinking about: the league's security apparatus. Staffed largely by former police and federal law enforcement personnel — often high-ranking ones — the security departments maintained by the league and individual teams have a reputation of being able to work their contacts and launch behind-the-scenes investigations at the first sign of trouble.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley likely would veto any legislation to legalize medical marijuana because of concerns over whether it would stand up to federal scrutiny, his spokeswoman said Thursday. His decision comes as states with programs similar to what Maryland is considering have come under fire from federal prosecutors and were forced to suspend all or parts of their programs. His decision could once again kill an effort that has stalled in the General Assembly for years. Maryland legislators are to begin debating three medical marijuana bills in House of Delegates committee hearings today.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2013
Employees at the former ESPN Zone restaurant in Baltimore who were laid off without notice when the Inner Harbor attraction closed in 2010 were not compensated correctly under federal law and are due additional payments, a federal judge ruled Thursday. About 140 full- and part-time employees worked at the restaurant when it was closed June 15, 2010. In October 2010, a class-action lawsuit was brought against Zone Enterprises of Maryland, a subsidiary of the Walt Disney Co., alleging that the company failed to give the employees 60 days' notice, as is generally required of companies with more than 40 employees under the federal Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification, or WARN, Act. The Baltimore restaurant was one of five ESPN Zone locations nationwide closed at the time.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2014
Johns Hopkins University will bestow an honorary degree next month on Edith "Edie" Windsor, the woman who successfully challenged the constitutionality of the federal law banning same-sex marriage. Windsor's attorney in last year's historic U.S. Supreme Court victory, Roberta Kaplan, will also receive an honorary degree at the May 22 commencement ceremony on the university's Homewood campus. The two women, lauded as heroes of the gay rights movement, are two of seven "distinguished achievers" being honored by Hopkins.
NEWS
September 27, 2011
An Ellicott City senior living facility is being sued for allegedly violating federal law for failing to hire a Muslim woman who would not remove her head scarf. The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission filed a lawsuit against Morningside House on behalf of Khadijah Salim on Monday. The lawsuit says Morningside House's director of health and wellness asked if Salim during a June 2010 interview if she would remove her religious headscarf, called a hijab, if she worked at the facility.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2011
A Baltimore County man who sued Kooper's Tavern and Poncabird Pub over an obscure identity law has voluntarily dropped the lawsuits. A lawsuit against the Middle River bar Catches stands. In September, Ronald L. Bradley, of Baltimore County, sued The Fells Point bar and Poncabird Pub in East Baltimore, as well as Catches, for printing the expiration date of his credit in sales receipts. He claimed that was in violation of the Fair and Accurate Credit Transaction Act, a federal law that aims to prevent identity theft.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
U.S. Customs and Border Patrol agents on Monday seized almost $33,000 from a man at Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport who reported bringing only $9,000 into the country on his flight from London. Customs officers found $14,930 in cash and three endorsed checks totaling $18,059 - a total of $32,989 - in the man's luggage, authorities said. There is no limit to how much money someone can bring into the country, but federal law requires travelers to declare amounts exceeding $10,000 or equivalent in foreign currency.
NEWS
By Will Fesperman, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
The Coast Guard is reconsidering plans to take on contractors to help process boat permits amid objections from a federal workers ' union. Officials at the Coast Guard's National Vessel Documentation Center, which issues permits for boats, are preparing to collect a new fee from recreational boaters to raise what they say is badly needed revenue. To collect the fee, they planned to contract with outside workers. The American Federation of Government Employees says the plan would violate a long-standing ban on outsourcing tasks currently performed by federal workers . "An annual renewal user fee is just another user fee, not new work," AFGE President J. David Cox Sr. wrote in a letter this month to the Office of Management and Budget.
NEWS
By Amanda Frost | June 13, 2014
On Monday, the Supreme Court dashed the hopes of noncitizen children who had already waited years for visas to come to the United States with their families. Federal law allows immigrants to bring their unmarried, minor children with them to the U.S., but those same laws put strict annual quotas on visas, forcing applicants to wait years for a visa to become available. If the children turn 21 years old during that waiting period, they must be left behind. In its decision in Mayorkas v. Cuellar de Osorio, the high court held that these older children must get in the back of a new line and start the visa petition process all over again, denying them credit for the years they have already spent waiting.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
The National Federation of the Blind has sued Maryland election officials, charging that their April decision not to approve a system that would make it easier for disabled people to cast absentee ballots privately violates federal law. The Baltimore-based federation filed suit this week asking the U.S. District Court to order the State Board of Elections to provide that technology in time for the June 24 primary election. "The right to a secret ballot that can be filled out privately and independently is just as important to people with disabilities as it is for other voters," said federation spokesman Chris Danielson.
NEWS
May 11, 2014
I was amazed in watching the gubernatorial debate when Attorney General Douglas Gansler said marijuana had been illegal for hundreds of years ( "Debate: Round 1," May 8). The actual number is less than 100. Various forms of regulation had grown up in the states from the late 19th century, but federal law only restricted it from 1937. To quote Wikipedia, "The Marijuana Tax Act of 1937 effectively made possession or transfer of cannabis illegal throughout the United States under federal law, excluding medical and industrial uses, through imposition of an excise tax on all sales of hemp.
NEWS
May 6, 2014
In response to former Anne Arundel County Executive John Leopold's letter ( "Leopold: June primary a self-serving move by Democrats," May 2), I am sure Mr. Leopold remembers from his days as a legislator that one of the most important responsibilities of a lawmaker is to ensure that state law complies with, and does not conflict with, federal law. As he is also aware, the Military and Overseas Voter Empowerment Act required states to move their...
NEWS
April 27, 2014
The recent Nevada ranchers standoff with the federal government has caused considerable discussion in the media ( "After Nevada ranch stand-off, emboldened militias ask: where next?" April 17). On the one side are the supporters of Cliven Bundy and his family, along with the various armed militias that have come to give aid. On the other side are the federal agents who claim they are trying to enforce federal law. We are led to believe that this rebellion was caused by the Bundys allowing their cattle to graze on federal land and not paying the fees and fines imposed on them as a result.
NEWS
May 11, 2014
I was amazed in watching the gubernatorial debate when Attorney General Douglas Gansler said marijuana had been illegal for hundreds of years ( "Debate: Round 1," May 8). The actual number is less than 100. Various forms of regulation had grown up in the states from the late 19th century, but federal law only restricted it from 1937. To quote Wikipedia, "The Marijuana Tax Act of 1937 effectively made possession or transfer of cannabis illegal throughout the United States under federal law, excluding medical and industrial uses, through imposition of an excise tax on all sales of hemp.
NEWS
September 28, 2014
McKenzie Elliott, the 3-year-old shot to death in Baltimore, is a recent victim of misguided drug laws ( "Politicians, churchmen talk policing in Northwest Baltimore ," Sept. 9). While I do not support open use of "illegal drugs," I do not find that drug sales or use represent a criminal act. Drug use has long been regarded as a "disabling condition" under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act. Federal and state law should not superimpose criminal penalties on the known disabled in direct contradiction to the specific intent in these two federal statutes.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2014
Johns Hopkins University will bestow an honorary degree next month on Edith "Edie" Windsor, the woman who successfully challenged the constitutionality of the federal law banning same-sex marriage. Windsor's attorney in last year's historic U.S. Supreme Court victory, Roberta Kaplan, will also receive an honorary degree at the May 22 commencement ceremony on the university's Homewood campus. The two women, lauded as heroes of the gay rights movement, are two of seven "distinguished achievers" being honored by Hopkins.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
The leaders of central Maryland's various jurisdictions will haggle and negotiate in the coming months over what regional transportation projects to prioritize over the next two-and-a-half decades — and officials are looking for ideas from the public. The Baltimore Regional Transportation Board must update the region's 25-year transportation priorities every four years, making them eligible for federal funding. "We're looking for long-range, regional thinking, not filling the pothole on your street," said Terry Freeland, senior transportation policy planner at the Baltimore Metropolitan Council.
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