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By Los Angeles Times | January 11, 1994
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton is changing the look of the federal judiciary.During his first year in office, more than half of Mr. Clinton's nominees for federal judgeships were women or members of racial and ethnic minorities, a proportion significantly higher than during any previous administration.For example, Presidents Reagan and Bush named white men to 82 percent of the available judgeships over their 12 years in office.In contrast, 39 percent of Mr. Clinton's first 48 nominees were white men. Administration officials predict that pattern will continue throughout Mr. Clinton's term.
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2012
The federal government is considering closing dozens of rural court sites across the country, including one that serves Maryland's Eastern Shore — a move that would force people to drive up to 110 miles to the nearest courthouse to have their cases heard. "It would be a grave inconvenience to litigants to have them come to a federal court in either Baltimore or Greenbelt. It makes no sense," said Deborah K. Chasanow, chief judge of Maryland's U.S. District Courts. The potential closures, 60 of them spread throughout 29 states, are being considered as a cost-cutting measure within the federal judiciary.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 31, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist is urging Congress to keep the federal court system out of a raging partisan spending debate over the 2000 Census.Funding for the federal judiciary and departments of Commerce, State and Justice is contained in the same appropriations bill.But because the Commerce Department is carrying out the controversial 2000 Census, Congress gave itself until June 15 to resolve its differences and pass the appropriations bill for those departments.After June 15, the judiciary and the three Cabinet departments will receive no federal funds unless a bill is passed.
NEWS
By Paul West, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2010
Lost in the gathering debate over President Barack Obama's next Supreme Court pick, a profound shift in the federal judiciary is taking place below the high court. Working methodically, and drawing sporadic fire from left and right, Obama is gradually reshaping the U.S. courts. Already, he's tipped the balance of two appellate circuits to Democratic-appointed majorities, with a third about to flip. He also is choosing a larger proportion of women and minorities for lifetime federal judgeships than other presidents.
NEWS
February 3, 1996
FOR THE NEXT several days, Baltimore will have more than its share of legal eagles, as the American Bar Association convenes its mid-year meeting here. The ABA, long regarded as one of the ultimate old-boys establishment groups, is now under the leadership of its first woman president. When Patricia Cooper Ramo, 53, left law school, few law firms were hiring women. Today women lawyers still face unjust obstacles in many firms, but they are a major presence in the profession.Under Ms. Ramo, the ABA is addressing a number of issues related to women, such as domestic violence and the difficulties women face in climbing the ladder in large law firms.
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gwyneth K. Shaw,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 5, 2005
WASHINGTON -- As the news of the death of Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist began to sink in yesterday, lawmakers and court watchers tried to keep the focus on his lengthy tenure and legacy. But with the unusual situation of two vacancies just four weeks before the beginning of the high court's fall term, there also was debate over the best way to proceed. The tributes to Rehnquist began pouring in late Saturday as word of his death from thyroid cancer spread. Rehnquist, 80, had been sick since last fall but had staunchly refused any talk of resignation.
NEWS
By John Perry Barlow | January 28, 1993
WITH quiet efficiency, our understanding of the first 10 amendments to the Constitution has been profoundly revised by the state and federal judiciary during the last couple decades, sparing us the untidy political melee of a constitutional convention. In light of these changes, a new Bill of Rights, based on current case law, might look something like what follows:AMENDMENT I.: Congress shall encourage the practice of Judeo-Christian religion by its own public exercise thereof and shall make no laws abridging the freedom of responsible speech, unless such speech is in a digitized form or contains material that is copyrighted, classified, proprietary or deeply offensive to non-Europeans, non-males, differently-abled or alternatively preferenced persons; or the right of the people to peaceably assemble, unless such assembly is taking place on corporate or military property or within an electronic environment; or to petition the government for a redress of grievances, unless those grievances relate to national security.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | July 2, 2001
WASHINGTON - Among the most significant ramifications of the unexpected switch in party control of the Senate is the outlook for confirmation of President Bush's judicial nominations, including the possibility of his making one or more for the Supreme Court. Before Independent Jim Jeffords quit Mr. Bush's party and put the Senate in Democratic hands, the White House - with a back of the hand to the American Bar Association - gave all indications of proceeding with a list of conservative nominees.
NEWS
January 23, 1993
In his annual year-end review of the federal judiciary, Chief Justice William Rehnquist allowed a rare bit of politics to intrude. Noting that the judiciary has a relatively small role in presidential inaugurations, Mr. Rehnquist added, "But it would be a rare judge who disavowed any interest in the changes in the executive and legislative branches and what they portend for the future."He is certainly more than somewhat interested in what changes the new president and Senate will bring about in the judiciary.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 27, 2001
SAN JOSE, Calif. - From epic trade-secret battles in Silicon Valley to an individual's bankruptcy in Topeka, Kan., the federal courts are moving toward a system of filing all documents electronically, hoping to eventually mothball those paper-filled manila folders jamming shelves in courthouses across the country. However, technology may not land easily in the nation's federal courts - the repository of personal but ordinarily public information. Confronted with a fierce debate over privacy and public access issues, the federal judiciary is struggling with how much of its business to send into the ether of the Internet.
NEWS
January 21, 2009
Other achievements bolster Bush's record I found the editorial "Happy warrior Bush" (Jan. 13) most disturbing. The Baltimore Sun should be commended for acknowledging two of President George W. Bush's accomplishments, treating AIDS abroad and protecting much of the Pacific environment. But the editorial ignored many other accomplishments such as demanding a more rational approach to global warming, enhancing the interrogation of terrorists, unswerving support for Israel, the No Child Left Behind program, his focus on promoting democracy around the world, achieving a Medicare prescription drug benefit, the surge in the Iraq war and, perhaps greatest of all, preventing further terror attacks in the United States since 9/11.
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gwyneth K. Shaw,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 5, 2005
WASHINGTON -- As the news of the death of Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist began to sink in yesterday, lawmakers and court watchers tried to keep the focus on his lengthy tenure and legacy. But with the unusual situation of two vacancies just four weeks before the beginning of the high court's fall term, there also was debate over the best way to proceed. The tributes to Rehnquist began pouring in late Saturday as word of his death from thyroid cancer spread. Rehnquist, 80, had been sick since last fall but had staunchly refused any talk of resignation.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 4, 2005
Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist, who joined the bench a generation ago as its often lone voice of conservative dissent and then steadily steered its turn to the right, died yesterday evening at his home in suburban Virginia. He was 80 and had been undergoing treatments for thyroid cancer since October. In more than 33 years on the high court, the past 18 as chief justice, Chief Justice Rehnquist was widely credited with leading the revolution that gave broader power to states and local governments.
NEWS
November 12, 2003
THE GENIUS of the U.S. Constitution's safeguard system of checks and balances was again on display this week when the Supreme Court agreed to hear the complaints of so-called enemy combatants confined indefinitely in Cuba. In so doing, the high court appropriately brushed aside Bush administration protests that the judiciary has no business mucking about with the commander in chief's wartime powers. Such a challenge could only have been ignored at great peril for the nation. No circumstance of military threat or terrorist attack -- not even an assault as grave as those of Sept.
NEWS
August 8, 2003
U.S. ATTORNEY GENERAL John Ashcroft likes to trumpet his tough-on-crime credentials - but going after federal judges who depart from federal sentencing guidelines isn't reason to toot his horn. Mr. Ashcroft is among those engaged in an attack on the federal judiciary's independence. Federal prosecutors are now required to report to the boss those judges who mete out sentences lower than the guidelines require, according to a July 28 memo from Mr. Ashcroft to U.S. attorneys. It stems from a new law aimed at curtailing the judges' flexibility.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2002
Imagine that because of political maneuvers and bureaucratic bungles, more than 10 percent of the seats in the U.S. Congress were vacant. Such a crisis would cause a national uproar. Yet that is the state of one of the triad that makes up the national government - the judicial branch. Of the 862 authorized federal judge positions, 95 are vacant. But few, outside the small circle of legal eagles, seem to care. The reason for the vacancies? Politics. Congress used to confine its fights to Supreme Court nominees.
NEWS
November 12, 2003
THE GENIUS of the U.S. Constitution's safeguard system of checks and balances was again on display this week when the Supreme Court agreed to hear the complaints of so-called enemy combatants confined indefinitely in Cuba. In so doing, the high court appropriately brushed aside Bush administration protests that the judiciary has no business mucking about with the commander in chief's wartime powers. Such a challenge could only have been ignored at great peril for the nation. No circumstance of military threat or terrorist attack -- not even an assault as grave as those of Sept.
NEWS
January 21, 2009
Other achievements bolster Bush's record I found the editorial "Happy warrior Bush" (Jan. 13) most disturbing. The Baltimore Sun should be commended for acknowledging two of President George W. Bush's accomplishments, treating AIDS abroad and protecting much of the Pacific environment. But the editorial ignored many other accomplishments such as demanding a more rational approach to global warming, enhancing the interrogation of terrorists, unswerving support for Israel, the No Child Left Behind program, his focus on promoting democracy around the world, achieving a Medicare prescription drug benefit, the surge in the Iraq war and, perhaps greatest of all, preventing further terror attacks in the United States since 9/11.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | July 2, 2001
WASHINGTON - Among the most significant ramifications of the unexpected switch in party control of the Senate is the outlook for confirmation of President Bush's judicial nominations, including the possibility of his making one or more for the Supreme Court. Before Independent Jim Jeffords quit Mr. Bush's party and put the Senate in Democratic hands, the White House - with a back of the hand to the American Bar Association - gave all indications of proceeding with a list of conservative nominees.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 27, 2001
SAN JOSE, Calif. - From epic trade-secret battles in Silicon Valley to an individual's bankruptcy in Topeka, Kan., the federal courts are moving toward a system of filing all documents electronically, hoping to eventually mothball those paper-filled manila folders jamming shelves in courthouses across the country. However, technology may not land easily in the nation's federal courts - the repository of personal but ordinarily public information. Confronted with a fierce debate over privacy and public access issues, the federal judiciary is struggling with how much of its business to send into the ether of the Internet.
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