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NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1996
Federal housing officials are expressing concern over Baltimore's new plan to exclude middle-income residents in the rowhouse communities that will replace the Lafayette Courts and Lexington Terrace housing projects."
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NEWS
September 25, 1999
Philip Brownstein, 82, a federal housing administrator who fought discrimination by developers and landlords, died Sept. 17 in Silver Spring. Mr. Brownstein was a top housing administrator in the Kennedy and Johnson administrations who expanded Depression-era housing laws to increase home ownership among minorities.Dr. William Eckert, 73, a forensic pathologist who was a consultant on major cases including the assassination of Robert F. Kennedy and the Jonestown massacre in Guyana, died Sept.
NEWS
By MICHAEL A. FLETCHER | September 25, 1994
The federal government took over Philadelphia's housing authority after documenting years of mismanagement and corruption that included abuses such as the 25 apartments repaired annually by a maintenance staff of 627 workers.In Washington D.C., auditors discovered that thieves were stealing $20,000 worth of equipment weekly from that city's housing authority, rated worst in the nation by federal housing officials.And in New Orleans, investigators found that it took an average of 154 days to renovate a public housing unit when it only should have taken a month.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Marcia Myers contributed to this article | March 2, 1995
Pledging a thorough investigation into the troubled $25.6 million program to fix up homes for the poor, Baltimore City Council Vice President Vera P. Hall is calling local and federal housing officials, as well as lawyers and tenants, to a hearing next week.Mrs. Hall, who chairs the council's housing committee, said she is "trying to cover the waterfront" in soliciting testimony from people involved in the no-bid repair program that has come under fire for shoddy work and inflated costs. The hearing is scheduled for 10 a.m. Tuesday.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun Staff Writer | July 30, 1995
Easing fears that congressional budget slashing would halt ++ efforts to build and renovate affordable apartments in Maryland over the next few years, lawmakers partially restored funding to a federal housing program late last week.The House voted Thursday to retain Federal Housing Administration mortgage insurance for multifamily housing, a turnaround from an earlier bid that threatened the construction, renovation or refinancing of up to 21 privately owned projects with more than 4,000 market-rate apartments.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun Staff Writer | May 23, 1995
Reversing America's declining rate of homeownership will require a new round of public-private partnerships -- not more government intervention -- a top federal housing official told community bankers in Baltimore yesterday.Nicolas P. Retsinas, second in command at the Department of Housing and Urban Development, offered a glimpse of the Clinton administration's upcoming strategy to get more people into homes."There continue to be serious unmet housing needs in this country," with "serious discrepancies in housing conditions and access to credit," said Mr. Retsinas, assistant secretary for housing.
NEWS
By PETER DREIER and JOHN ATLAS and PETER DREIER and JOHN ATLAS,Newsday | June 2, 1991
Most Americans think that federal housing assistance is a poor people's program. In fact, less than one-fifth of all low-income Americans receive federal housing subsidies. In contrast, more than three-quarters of wealthy Americans -- many living in mansions -- get housing aid from Washington.The homeowner deduction -- which allows homeowners to deduct all property tax and mortgage interest from their federal income taxes -- will cost the federal government more than $47 billion this year alone, according to a new Joint Taxation Committee analysis of "tax expenditures."
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Staff Writer | May 6, 1993
Baltimore housing officials plan to use part of a surplus in federal funds from the Nehemiah housing project in West Baltimore to bid for vacant private homes at the city's May 12 tax sale.The plan was enthusiastically embraced yesterday by the Board of Estimates, which approved the new use of federal Community Development Block Grant money.The recently completed Nehemiah I Housing Project -- consisting of 300 new and rehabilitated houses in the Sandtown-Winchester and Penn-North neighborhoods -- finished with a budget surplus of $900,000, according to David K. Elam, development director for the city's housing department.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff writer | November 24, 1991
The county housing office and three local human service agencies arecollaborating in an innovative program to ease homelessness in the county.Through the program, Grassroots, Citizens Against Spousal Assault and the Community Action Council will be able to arrange federally subsidized housing for clients who are still receiving their support services.The new process will allow a smoother transition for people moving from a shelter to a home and guarantees clients a federal housing subsidy when they successfully complete their work with the agency, say housing and agency officials.
BUSINESS
By KENNETH HARNEY | March 4, 2001
WITH SIGNS of a slowdown evident in key segments of the national economy, should you be waiting for the next shoe to drop - a decline in the rate of appreciation in the value of your home? Maybe. But the federal agency that tracks home-value changes says in a new study that there are virtually no statistical signs yet that the housing appreciation boom is weakening. In fact, the latest quarterly data from the Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight, released Thursday, reveal that the year 2000 was even hotter than reported earlier - an 8.1 percent average gain in the resale value of existing homes across the country.
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