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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 17, 1990
WASHINGTON -- An estimated 240,000 low-income and homeless families would be housed by state and local officials and existing housing programs would be bolstered under a $57.7 billion bill expected to be signed into law in the next week or two.The first overhaul of housing programs in a decade was approved by a Senate-House conference committee late Monday night. The bill also attempts to shore up the troubled Federal Housing Administration while preserving low-income interest programs.The bill authorizes $27.5 billion for housing programs in fiscal 1991 -- $3.4 billion more than the previous fiscal year -- and $29.9 billion in fiscal 1992.
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NEWS
December 28, 2013
During the last recession, more than 90 million people - a third of the nation's population - saw their incomes fall below 200 percent of the federal poverty line, or about $46,000 a year for a family of four. Many of those individuals and families have never recovered, and as a result states across the country are now facing what U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan calls "the worst rental affordability crisis that this country has known" as rising rents threaten millions of Americans with homelessness.
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NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2005
The date for a trial to determine remedies for a finding of discrimination by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development against black public housing residents in Baltimore has been pushed back to at least March. The second, or remedy, phase of the trial in the 10-year-old civil rights case had been scheduled to begin Dec. 5 but was delayed by disputes between lawyers for HUD and public housing residents over the taking of expert witness depositions, according to court records.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2013
Nearly three dozen workers at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development office in Baltimore - roughly a third of the agency's workforce in Maryland - are being forced to transfer out of state or take a buyout. The choice, which will affect 32 employees at the agency's South Howard Street field office, comes as part of a national reorganization aimed at saving about $45 million a year. The department is consolidating workers in 50 offices nationwide who facilitate the construction and rehabilitation of multifamily housing into 10 offices, HUD spokesman Jerry Brown said Wednesday.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 13, 1995
As Baltimore prepared to turn over security at its high-rise housing projects to another company, federal housing officials tried yesterday to calm the fears of tenant leaders worried about an increase in crime with the dismissal of the Nation of Islam Security Agency.Barring court action today, the city at midnight is expected to replace NOI Security with Wells Fargo Guard Services at a dozen high-rise apartment buildings.A federal judge has scheduled a hearing for this morning to consider a temporary restraining order sought by NOI Security, which has sued the city and federal housing agencies.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Staff Writer | November 23, 1993
Baltimore will serve as a pilot program for a national effort to channel more federal housing funds toward low-income residents and minority businesses, officials announced yesterday.Under the initiative, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development will work with other federal agencies to coordinate programs and cut red tape to make it easier to put into effect a 25-year-old requirement that recipients of federal housing funds give preference to the hiring of neighborhood residents and minority contractors.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Staff Writer | November 23, 1993
Baltimore will serve as a pilot program for a new national effort to channel more federal housing funds toward low-income residents and minority businesses, officials announced yesterday.Under the initiative, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development will work with other federal agencies to coordinate programs and cut red tape to make it easier to put into effect a 25-year-old requirement that recipients of federal housing funds give preference to the hiring of neighborhood residents and minority contractors.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 24, 1996
Some low-income Westminster residents at the end of the line for federal housing subsidies could move up, while others near the front could be pushed back.Westminster officials want to toughen rules for housing assistance. The City Council approved a proposal last night that would give priority to those who have jobs or are in job training programs.Social welfare workers contend that the proposal would further erode aid to the vulnerable, including the homeless and battered women.The change means Westminster will stop giving preference for housing assistance to people who live in substandard housing, are homeless, have been evicted or have left their homes because of physical violence, or who pay more than half of their monthly income for rent and utilities.
NEWS
June 26, 1998
CAJOLING and political arm-twisting by Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke have borne fruit: Baltimore has been saved -- at least temporarily -- from becoming a target of a federal housing fraud probe.This is good news for City Hall, which had vehemently tried to stop FBI agents and auditors from looking at activities under the control of Housing Commissioner Daniel P. Henson III.Mr. Schmoke was able to persuade a congressional committee to hold off on a probe of Baltimore, New Orleans and San Francisco by arguing that Susan Gaffney, the inspector general of the Department of Housing and Urban Development, had unjustly targeted cities with mayors and top housing officials who are African-American.
NEWS
By Bob Dart and Bob Dart,Cox News Service Kathleen Beeman of The Sun's Washington bureau contributed to this article | July 9, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Red tape and restrictive zoning have put the American dream of a house in the suburbs out of reach of millions of families, a presidential panel reported yesterday.Not only are the working poor economically excluded, but many suburban communities "end up as homogeneous enclaves where households such as schoolteachers, firefighters, young families and the elderly on fixed incomes are all regulated out," the report said.The report blamed excessive local regulations for adding up to 35 percent to the price of a new house.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2012
Federal officials have extended a regulatory waiver that makes it easier to "flip" properties - a move meant to encourage the renovation of foreclosed homes but that critics say could herald the return of predatory schemes. The Federal Housing Administration has waived through 2014 an anti-flipping regulation, which had prevented the agency from insuring mortgages on properties sold within 90 days of acquisition. The waiver, first implemented in 2010 to bolster the flagging housing market, is intended to enable investors to buy and quickly rehab properties as the market continues to struggle.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2012
Edwin P. Post II, a retired federal housing inspector and veteran of two wars, died Oct. 25 of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Sunrise Assisted-Living in Columbia. The former Mays Chapel resident was 89. The son of a Con-Ed lineman and a homemaker, Edwin Price Post II was born and raised on Staten Island, N.Y., where he graduated from McKee High School. He served in the Navy during World War II from 1942 to 1947, where he was a patternmaker. He was recalled to active duty during the Korean War, serving again from 1950 to 1951.
NEWS
By David Abromowitz and Jack Manning | August 11, 2011
The ongoing housing and jobs crises were submerged by the saga over what to do about federal debt. Unfortunately, with triggers in place for deeper cuts, the solution to the debt saga may come at the expense of a successful public/private partnership that actually addresses the housing and jobs crises. For nearly 25 years, the federal government has encouraged the development of affordable rental housing by using a unique federal tax credit — one that fosters a strong partnership between public and private interests, while benefiting families and local communities.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2011
State and local officials joined Shaun Donovan, the nation's top housing official, on a tour Friday of construction efforts that they hope will give residents of a blighted corner of West Baltimore affordable and environmentally minded housing. The development, which aims to renovate or build 111 low-income apartments by the end of this year, is in the Poppleton neighborhood, where boarded-up buildings sit alongside tidy, well-kept homes. The Department of Housing and Urban Development provided $1.5 million of federal stimulus funding to outfit apartments in the development with features that include double-pane windows, cabinets free of formaldehyde and energy-efficient appliances.
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | February 22, 2009
Scouring Federal Hill, Don Smith and Bob Marciak hoped they would find a spacious rowhouse, a little different in style, that would accommodate their wish for a backyard as a soothing refuge from the bustling city. They looked at about 50 houses, Smith recalled, before opening the door to a renovated century-old residence where a gas fireplace exuded a welcome feeling, where the wide living room had a wall of built-in cabinets and shelves, and where a graceful staircase and decorative columns drew the eye toward the rest of the house.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | July 30, 2008
Hundreds of thousands of struggling homeowners may get the help they need to stave off foreclosure from the federal housing bill that Congress passed last week. But for hundreds of thousands more, people like Veronica Peterson, it comes too late. Peterson is waiting for the eviction notice that will force her out of the $545,000 house she bought in Columbia two years ago.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 14, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Federal officials say that President Clinton probably will ask Congress to replace the federal agency that provides mortgage insurance to millions of home buyers with a new government-controlled corporation that operates more like a private business.The agency, the Federal Housing Administration, was created 60 years ago to help combat the effects of the Depression. It has provided mortgage insurance for more than 51 million home buyers, enabling many of them to get mortgages they could not otherwise obtain.
NEWS
December 18, 1990
After 10 years of willful neglect, America now has a kinder and gentler federal housing program. Housing and Urban Development chief Jack Kemp can take some of the credit here, but the 101st Congress did the lion's share of the work in shifting course. Mr. Kemp's HOPE program, designed to sell off public housing to tenants, and Shelter Plus Care, which combines housing aid with social services, both made it into a landmark housing bill signed into law in late November.The bill has many other parts, some of which give the Bush administration pause.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2005
The date for a trial to determine remedies for a finding of discrimination by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development against black public housing residents in Baltimore has been pushed back to at least March. The second, or remedy, phase of the trial in the 10-year-old civil rights case had been scheduled to begin Dec. 5 but was delayed by disputes between lawyers for HUD and public housing residents over the taking of expert witness depositions, according to court records.
BUSINESS
By KENNETH HARNEY | May 15, 2005
WASHINGTON - Federal Housing Secretary Alphonso Jackson has an urgent request for potential first-time buyers, especially those with limited or imperfect credit histories: When you shop for a home this spring or summer, take a hard look at the new, consumer-friendly breed of FHA mortgages now rolling into the marketplace. Equally important, be wary of the higher rates, fees and penalties that often come with loans in the "subprime" market. Jackson has a special reason for wanting to persuade first-time buyers to check out FHA loans.
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