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NEWS
July 1, 2001
Baltimore ranks eighth among U.S. metropolitan areas in percentage of bad roads Metro area...Percentage...Rank New Orleans...35...1 Detroit...35...1 Los Angeles...33...3 Indianapolis...31...4 San Jose Calif...30...5 San Francisco-Oakland...29...6 Chicago...27...7 Baltimore...26...8 Sacramento Calif...25...9 Grand Rapids, Mich...25...9 Norfolk, Va...24...11 Denver...23...12 Oklahoma City...23...12 Dallas...23...12 Source: Federal Highway Administration, 2000. SUN STAFF
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BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2013
The Maryland Transportation Authority is reviewing a request from CSX Transportation Corp. to lease about five acres under Interstate 95 to be used for construction of the train and truck depot that will serve the Port of Baltimore. The land would allow CSX to expand the footprint of the 70-acre site near the Morrell Park neighborhood in Southwest Baltimore for its $90 million facility to transfer cargo containers from trains to trucks and vice versa. The state has promised to pay one-third of the cost.
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BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2013
The Maryland Transportation Authority is reviewing a request from CSX Transportation Corp. to lease about five acres under Interstate 95 to be used for construction of the train and truck depot that will serve the Port of Baltimore. The land would allow CSX to expand the footprint of the 70-acre site near the Morrell Park neighborhood in Southwest Baltimore for its $90 million facility to transfer cargo containers from trains to trucks and vice versa. The state has promised to pay one-third of the cost.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2012
Grout used to protect steel support cables in the Woodrow Wilson Bridge, which carries Interstate 95 over the Potomac River, may be contaminated with an excessive level of chloride, a corroding substance known to accelerate rusting. The Federal Highway Administration warned 21 states — including Maryland — that as many as three dozen bridges were built with possibly defective grout manufactured in Ohio between November 2002 and March 2010. Chloride-contaminated grout was blamed in the collapse of a pedestrian walkway at Lowe's Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C. in 2000, injuring more than 100 fans.
FEATURES
By Katherine Shaver and The Washington Post | January 15, 2010
Prince George's County Council members say officials overseeing construction of the Intercounty Connector are penalizing the county by canceling or changing more of its environmental projects than those in Montgomery County. ICC officials said they plan to cut some previously required environmental projects and to reclassify others because the highway's final design ended up sparing almost a mile more of streams and 30 more acres of wetlands and forests than they had expected, leaving less environmental damage for them to offset.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2012
Grout used to protect steel support cables in the Woodrow Wilson Bridge, which carries Interstate 95 over the Potomac River, may be contaminated with an excessive level of chloride, a corroding substance known to accelerate rusting. The Federal Highway Administration warned 21 states — including Maryland — that as many as three dozen bridges were built with possibly defective grout manufactured in Ohio between November 2002 and March 2010. Chloride-contaminated grout was blamed in the collapse of a pedestrian walkway at Lowe's Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C. in 2000, injuring more than 100 fans.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | January 3, 1992
Saving about 57 acres of trees and wetlands while expanding U.S. 50 between Parole and Bowie will cost the state and federal governments about $6 million.State Highway Administrator Hal Kassoff said hisagency is redesigning the expanded road, which includes additional lanes and new interchanges at Routes 3 and 424, to protect the trees and wetlands along the shoulders.The new design will replace the 30-foot-wide shoulders -- a safety feature required by the Federal Highway Administration on interstate roads -- on either side of the highway with a narrower shoulder andguard rails or jersey barriers, Kassoff said.
NEWS
February 24, 1992
George R. Turner Jr., a federal highway engineer and administrator for 41 years, died Friday of cancer at his home in Millers. He was 69 and lived in the Baltimore area for 10 years.Services for Mr. Turner will be held at 10 a.m. tomorrow at Grace and St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Monument Street and Park Avenue.He started working for the Federal Highway Administration as an engineer in the late 1940s.In 1978, Mr. Turner joined the Federal Highway Administration's Baltimore office, working for three years as deputy regional administrator for six mid-Atlantic states, and for seven years as regional administrator.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 2, 2005
Opponents of the Intercounty Connector urged state and federal agencies yesterday to extend a Feb. 15 deadline for commenting on the project until June 3. Forty-five organizations fighting the proposed highway in the Washington suburbs say the State Highway Administration and the Federal Highway Administration have denied them enough time to analyze a draft environmental impact statement released in November. The statement and its technical reports amount to thousands of pages, and the groups charge they have been denied adequate access to the documents.
NEWS
September 10, 2002
The Federal Highway Administration is working to correct road settlement on the Baltimore-Washington Parkway in Prince George's County. One lane on the northbound and southbound sides of the parkway at the Route 197 interchange is likely to be closed this week. Closures will be from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. southbound through Friday; 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. northbound through Friday; and 6 a.m. to 4 p.m. in both directions Saturday. Delays should be expected southbound below Route 198 and northbound above the Capital Beltway.
FEATURES
By Katherine Shaver and The Washington Post | January 15, 2010
Prince George's County Council members say officials overseeing construction of the Intercounty Connector are penalizing the county by canceling or changing more of its environmental projects than those in Montgomery County. ICC officials said they plan to cut some previously required environmental projects and to reclassify others because the highway's final design ended up sparing almost a mile more of streams and 30 more acres of wetlands and forests than they had expected, leaving less environmental damage for them to offset.
NEWS
July 1, 2001
Baltimore ranks eighth among U.S. metropolitan areas in percentage of bad roads Metro area...Percentage...Rank New Orleans...35...1 Detroit...35...1 Los Angeles...33...3 Indianapolis...31...4 San Jose Calif...30...5 San Francisco-Oakland...29...6 Chicago...27...7 Baltimore...26...8 Sacramento Calif...25...9 Grand Rapids, Mich...25...9 Norfolk, Va...24...11 Denver...23...12 Oklahoma City...23...12 Dallas...23...12 Source: Federal Highway Administration, 2000. SUN STAFF
BUSINESS
January 6, 2002
Morgan State to offer courses on right of way Morgan State University's National Transportation Center will offer real estate courses that train students in the right-of-way land acquisitions profession. The university is working with the Federal Highway Administration's Office of Real Estate Services and the International Right-of-Way Association to offer the curriculum. The first course - about principles of real estate appraisal - will begin in the spring semester this year. Scholarship money is available for the course, which is approved by the Maryland Real Estate Appraisers' Commission and the Appraisal Institute.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | December 8, 2001
The Bush administration rejected yesterday Maryland's request that a pro-union labor agreement be required for construction of the Woodrow Wilson bridge project. The decision leaves Gov. Parris N. Glendening with a choice of ending his push for a "project labor agreement," or PLA, or pursuing a legal challenge that could lead to months of construction delays. "We're reviewing what the impact of the [Bush administration's] decision will be," a spokesman for Glendening said late yesterday.
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