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By Knight-Ridder News Service | July 11, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Contrary to the intent of affirmative-action laws, the share of federal highway money going to black contractors has been shrinking for nearly a decade.More work reserved for disadvantaged businesses is going instead to white-owned companies that are controlled -- at least in name -- by women.The Federal Highway Administration's numbers are striking.Since 1985, the annual share of federal highway money for African-American contractors has been cut almost in half, to $286 million, while the share for companies owned by white women more than doubled, to $879 million.
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NEWS
By Rockford Weitz, Scott G. Borgerson and John Curtis Perry | April 8, 2008
Transportation authorities recently closed a two-mile elevated section of Interstate 95 in Philadelphia for several days to conduct emergency repairs after discovering a 6-foot crack in a concrete support pillar. Luckily, a highway inspector noticed the widening crack and helped avert a tragic collapse such as the nation witnessed in Minneapolis last August. Baltimore is also at high risk to suffer a catastrophe from crumbling infrastructure due to the confluence of six aging major highway systems.
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NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff Marina Sarris contributed to this story | June 5, 1991
Under a plan worked out between lawmakers and the Schaefer administration to keep the state from losing federal highway funds, the General Assembly will decide at a special session later this month whether drivers should pay more for licenses, titles, tags and other services.House Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell Jr., D-Eastern Shore, the last key legislative opponent of the fee increase, agreed yesterday to support a measure that would produce $40 million in new revenues.The Maryland Department of Transportation says it needs that much in matching funds -- at least temporarily -- to secure another $312 million in federal highway money.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun reporter | August 25, 2007
Concrete falling from an overhead bridge - where deterioration found in 2005 has not yet been repaired - forced the closure of the Baltimore-Washington Parkway in Greenbelt yesterday and snarled traffic between the two cities for several hours. The closing, which came less than four weeks after the collapse of the Interstate 35W bridge over the Mississippi River in Minneapolis, raised new questions about the safety of Maryland's infrastructure. One corrosion engineer warned that any instance of concrete falling from a bridge indicates "a serious problem."
NEWS
February 24, 1992
George R. Turner Jr., a federal highway engineer and administrator for 41 years, died Friday of cancer at his home in Millers. He was 69 and lived in the Baltimore area for 10 years.Services for Mr. Turner will be held at 10 a.m. tomorrow at Grace and St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Monument Street and Park Avenue.He started working for the Federal Highway Administration as an engineer in the late 1940s.In 1978, Mr. Turner joined the Federal Highway Administration's Baltimore office, working for three years as deputy regional administrator for six mid-Atlantic states, and for seven years as regional administrator.
NEWS
January 18, 1991
Unless state officials expand the current auto emissions testing program to include six rural counties, Maryland could lose millions of dollars in federal highway funds. Increased population and motor vehicle use have rendered once-bucolic areas of the state as vulnerable to pollution as more populous cities and towns, where emission testing is already required.Governor Schaefer is expected to introduce legislation indefinitely extending the seven-year-old emissions testing program, which expires this year.
NEWS
By New York Times | November 23, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Spending on the nation's highways and the corresponding costs to states would rise under a plan being considered by the the Bush administration.The revision is considered the most important one in decades, coming as the 43,000-mile Interstate Highway System nears completion and as many states are short of cash.While the majority of federal highway spending has for decades gone to the Interstates, the proposal seeks to make more money available for upgrading primary highways, such as U.S. 1, which runs roughly parallel to Interstate 95 from Maine to Florida.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 2, 2005
Opponents of the Intercounty Connector urged state and federal agencies yesterday to extend a Feb. 15 deadline for commenting on the project until June 3. Forty-five organizations fighting the proposed highway in the Washington suburbs say the State Highway Administration and the Federal Highway Administration have denied them enough time to analyze a draft environmental impact statement released in November. The statement and its technical reports amount to thousands of pages, and the groups charge they have been denied adequate access to the documents.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | December 8, 2001
The Bush administration rejected yesterday Maryland's request that a pro-union labor agreement be required for construction of the Woodrow Wilson bridge project. The decision leaves Gov. Parris N. Glendening with a choice of ending his push for a "project labor agreement," or PLA, or pursuing a legal challenge that could lead to months of construction delays. "We're reviewing what the impact of the [Bush administration's] decision will be," a spokesman for Glendening said late yesterday.
NEWS
June 6, 1991
It was inevitable that state lawmakers would end up with no option but to increase motor vehicle fees. The facts have been indisputable since the 1991 session convened: The transportation fund is eroding and highways and bridges are crumbling.Chief among the reasons is that federal highway money has dwindled while the Motor Vehicle Administration's services and costs increased. To make things worse, revenues from fees for licenses, titles and tags have remained stable. As a result, fees amounted to only 33 percent of the MVA's budget last year, compared to 84 percent in 1955.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | August 13, 2007
CHICAGO -- In the wake of the Minnesota bridge collapse, House Transportation Committee Chairman James L. Oberstar, Democrat of Minnesota, was struck with a blinding insight on how to solve the problem of neglected infrastructure. Before you continue reading, let me suggest that you take a pair of vise grips and use them to get a tight hold on your wallet. Because what occurred to Mr. Oberstar is that the federal government needs more money to spend on aging bridges. "If you're not prepared to invest another five cents in bridge reconstruction and road reconstruction, then God help you," he declared.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Nia-Malika Henderson and Susan Gvozdas and Nia-Malika Henderson,Sun reporters | August 7, 2007
The electronic sign towering over Scardina Home Services on Veterans Highway in Millersville isn't just about business, its employees say. At Christmastime, snowflakes fall over lighted messages wishing drivers happy holidays. With patriotic images of the Vietnam Memorial and soldiers, other messages urge commuters to support the troops. But some highway safety experts say such eye-catching signs could distract drivers - presenting another hazard for motorists already juggling cell phones, following the spoken directions from electronic navigation devices and otherwise stretching their powers of concentration.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER and MICHAEL DRESSER,SUN REPORTER | April 11, 2006
Rockville -- Opponents of a proposed east-west highway through the Washington suburbs accused state and federal highway officials yesterday of preparing an "incomplete, inadequate and biased" study that understates the environmental harm that would result from construction of the $2.4 billion toll road. A coalition of environmental groups called on federal officials to send the State Highway Administration back to the drawing board to reconsider the impact of the Intercounty Connector and alternatives for relieving congestion in the traffic-choked area.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER and MICHAEL DRESSER,SUN REPORTER | January 5, 2006
State and federal highway officials have signed off on a final plan to build a $2.4 billion highway through Washington's suburbs - an agreement that could clear the way for construction of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s top transportation project to begin as early as this fall. Maryland Transportation Secretary Robert L. Flanagan and Highway Administrator Neil J. Pedersen announced yesterday that they had reached agreement with federal officials on a revised environmental impact statement for the Intercounty Connector.
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gwyneth K. Shaw,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 29, 2005
WASHINGTON -- A huge $286 billion plan for the nation's highways and transit systems is likely to win final congressional approval today, after a last-minute snag delayed a House vote last night. A provision -- inserted by a senator during negotiations between the House and Senate -- to try to reopen a runway at a Montana military base drew the ire of House leaders, who decided to put off a planned late-night vote and try to force the Senate to back down. Both chambers are trying to complete work today, in order to begin a recess that will last until after Labor Day. Maryland would receive $2.9 billion in federal highway funds and more than $900 million for mass transit over the six-year period covered by the bill.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2005
The Ehrlich administration's plan for financing construction of the Intercounty Connector highway is in trouble in the General Assembly, with leading legislators questioning its heavy reliance on borrowing. Defying warnings that they could be putting the project in jeopardy, lawmakers in both houses are drafting alternatives to the administration's proposal to use $1 billion in bonds backed by future federal highway aid to help pay for the highway. The $2.4 billion project does not need legislative approval, but the administration cannot go forward unless it can persuade the Assembly to accept its financing plan.
NEWS
By Kansas City Star | February 6, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Nancy L. Kassebaum vows to be dragged into the 21st century inch by inch, not centimeter by centimeter.She and two Republican colleagues from Kansas last week introduced bills to block a plan to replace all highway signs in the United States with signs listing distances and speed limits in metric units by October 1996."
NEWS
By Citizen's for and Citizen's for,The Scenic Severn River Bridge and Defense Briefings filed in Baltimore's U.S. District Court. Robert Lee Staff writer | November 25, 1991
Did state and federal highway officials go through all the public hearings and bureaucratic red tape required to replace the beloved old Severn River drawbridge with a behemoth 80-foot span?This and other questions will be weighed tomorrow by U.S. District Judge Joseph C. Howard, who will decide whether to halt work on the Route 450 replacement span, slated to begin next week.Bryson Popham, one of two private Annapolis lawyers representing the city free in its lawsuit challenging the high span, says state and federal highway planners didn't meet all the necessary requirements, but concedes "there is no smoking gun."
NEWS
March 6, 2005
MUCH ATTENTION was paid last week to the environmental risks posed by the Intercounty Connector as symbolized by an imperiled centuries-old tulip poplar. And while the federal EPA's criticism of the proposed 18-mile highway across Montgomery County was surprising (so much for the governor's highly touted environmental mitigations), there's a bigger obstacle in the ICC's path: its $2.4 billion cost. More precisely, it's the growing concern among legislators that the administration's creative financing plan is putting Maryland out on a limb.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 2, 2005
Opponents of the Intercounty Connector urged state and federal agencies yesterday to extend a Feb. 15 deadline for commenting on the project until June 3. Forty-five organizations fighting the proposed highway in the Washington suburbs say the State Highway Administration and the Federal Highway Administration have denied them enough time to analyze a draft environmental impact statement released in November. The statement and its technical reports amount to thousands of pages, and the groups charge they have been denied adequate access to the documents.
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