Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFederal Government
IN THE NEWS

Federal Government

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 23, 2011
If Maryland was not adjacent to the federal government, which has overspent revenues by close to $5 trillion in the last five years, the Maryland economy would make Michigan's economy look good ("Jobs: a silver lining," June 21). Also money is not the answer to improving education. Getting parents of lower income kids involved is. But I understand that is not politically correct in some circles. Lyle Rescott, Marriottsville
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Pamela Wood and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
The workers who staff the federal government in Washington are whiter, richer, more educated and more liberal than the rest of the country, according to two political scientists at Johns Hopkins University —who warn of the potential for a troubling gap between the federal workforce and the people it serves. "It might be a problem," said Jennifer Bachner, director of the Hopkins' master's degree program in government analytics. "If the government looks very different demographically than the American people, the question is: Can they govern well?
Advertisement
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | January 10, 2013
The federal government announced the creation of 106 new accountable care organziations, including five in Maryland, that will provide coordinated care to Medicare patients. Accountable Care Organizations are groups of doctors, hospitals, clinics and other health care providers created under health reform that work together to care for patients. The hope is that the coordinated care will help reduce medical errors and result in cost savings by  keeping people healthier. More than 250 accountable care organizations have been created around the country since passage of health reform.
NEWS
September 22, 2014
Maryland's decision to join a handful of states that allow undocumented immigrants the chance to obtain driver's licenses was a pragmatic one designed to keep residents safe. Border security, deportation policy and pathways to citizenship are not within Maryland's purview, but ensuring that drivers on the road are competent, that their vehicles are registered and that they purchase insurance are the state's responsibility. The establishment of a two-tiered license system here - in which those who cannot document their immigration status are allowed the chance to obtain a license valid for driving but not purposes like getting on airplanes or entering federal buildings - was simply a rational response to the twin facts that some hundreds of thousands of undocumented immigrants live in Maryland and that by necessity they will drive whether we like it or not. The policy is of a piece with others the state has adopted in recent months.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2013
Two years after the Obama administration relaunched an effort to get rid of surplus federal buildings, almost all of the excess property identified in Maryland remains in government hands, a review by The Baltimore Sun has found. Red tape, lack of congressional action and inadequate funding have left federal agencies stuck with at least 200 vacant or underutilized properties in the state, from closet-size storage sheds in Beltsville to an eight-story, historic office building a block from Baltimore's Inner Harbor.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
President Barack Obama was expected to sign legislation late Wednesday to reopen the federal government 16 days after agencies were forced to close. Here's a look at what happens next: When will federal employees return to work? The Obama administration said federal workers should expect to return to work on Thursday. The White House encouraged workers to check the U.S. Office of Personnel Management's website for further guidance. What about back pay? The agreement passed by Congress on Wednesday provides retroactive pay to furloughed employees.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2013
The federal shutdown has furloughed many public employees and curtailed services, but one sign of government activity last week continued to hover over Baltimore undeterred. A Navy blimp has been in flight over the city since last month, as a contractor tests its sensors to see how well they will work for mapping. Doug Abbotts, a spokesman for the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division said the 178-foot blimp's trek, which was scheduled to end Saturday, was funded through a contract his agency made with the Army earlier in the year.
NEWS
March 27, 2013
Regarding your story about "unconscious bias" against blacks in federal jobs, since blacks make up 13.1 percent of the population and 17.8 percent of the federal workforce how can this be an issue ("Study finds 'unconscious bias' against blacks in federal jobs," March 24)? Also, the article just talks about obstacles and bias. None of the "what to do" items in the gray box are actions blacks can take to help themselves. Once again, the root issue is not addressed. I recruited for many years at local colleges, and Morgan State University students were, on average, by far the least prepared to advance in the workplace.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2014
A ruling by a federal judge in a lawsuit filed by federal employees over the government shutdown last fall has given the workers hope that they could soon be eligible for a payout. U.S. Court of Federal Claims Chief Judge Patricia Campbell-Smith declined to dismiss the lawsuit brought by some 2,000 workers who were deemed essential during the during the 16-day shutdown. The plaintiffs worked through the shutdown but didn't get paid on time for their labor. Campbell-Smith wrote in an opinion that the federal government violated the Fair Labor Standards Act, but she didn't go as far as saying that the government needed to pay the plaintiffs.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2013
Florence P. Haseltine knows the power of scientists meeting face to face. The former researcher at the National Institutes of Health notes a list of milestones achieved through networking and collaboration at conferences, such as the deliberations that led to advances that helped slow the spread of HIV. Now Haseltine, former director of the Center for Population Research of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development in Rockville, worries...
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2014
A ruling by a federal judge in a lawsuit filed by federal employees over the government shutdown last fall has given the workers hope that they could soon be eligible for a payout. U.S. Court of Federal Claims Chief Judge Patricia Campbell-Smith declined to dismiss the lawsuit brought by some 2,000 workers who were deemed essential during the during the 16-day shutdown. The plaintiffs worked through the shutdown but didn't get paid on time for their labor. Campbell-Smith wrote in an opinion that the federal government violated the Fair Labor Standards Act, but she didn't go as far as saying that the government needed to pay the plaintiffs.
HEALTH
By John Fritze and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
Federal auditors looking into Maryland's flawed health insurance exchange are subpoenaing documents as part of their probe and have sought information from the lead contractor hired by the state to build the site. North Dakota-based Noridian Healthcare Solutions, the former prime contractor with a multimillion-dollar deal to design Maryland's online insurance marketplace, received a request for documents related to the project from the inspector general of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services on July 30, the company's president said Tuesday.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
When federal databases containing sensitive information on U.S. intelligence or nuclear weapons come under cyberattack, the agencies call on major companies like Lockheed Martin, Verizon and Booz Allen Hamilton - as well as a two-year-old startup in Federal Hill - to shore up defenses. Maddrix LLC is among seven companies to be the first ones accredited in a new National Security Agency vetting program. The firms use complex data analysis and digital forensics to root out invaders that are lurking or have left behind tracks during their intrusions.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and By Liz Bowie | August 13, 2014
Low-income students in Maryland who decide to take the Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate tests will get some subsidies from the federal government to help cover some of the cost. The federal government announced Tuesday that it is awarding Maryland a $635,000 grant to help pay for the tests. Maryland was one of more than 40 states to receive funding totaling $28.4 million. The Advanced Placement tests now cost $89 a test, and some students will take more than one test.
NEWS
July 31, 2014
Thank you for your thoughtful, balanced editorial on Republican Rep. Paul Ryan's recent discussion of poverty ( "Ryan's safety net," July 28). A quick read of Congressman Ryan's proposal show his appreciation of the federal Earned Income Tax Credit as an effective strategy for helping low-income working families rise out of poverty or at least improve their economic security. However, Mr. Ryan's proposals for SNAP (formerly food stamps) are, as noted by Democratic Rep. Chris Van Hollen, problematic in that they remove protections for poor families who need such food assistance.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
Attendance at Maryland's national parks, including at Baltimore's Fort McHenry, dropped in 2013, thanks in part to a shutdown of the federal government that closed the parks, officials said. Maryland's two dozen national parks took in 6.6 million visits last year, down by about 40,000 from 2012. The state's parks generated $212 million in 2013, about $5 million less than the year before. Baltimore's Fort McHenry took in 678,000 visitors last year and $37,000, a drop from 2012 when the site brought in 700,000 visitors and $40,000.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2012
Next month, the U.S. Office of Personnel Management rolls out the Pathways programs, created by President Barack Obama in an effort to better attract young people to federal government jobs. The programs aim to streamline and standardize recruiting, application and hiring for interns, recent graduates and presidential management fellows across the federal government, and to increase the percentage of interns who become full-time federal employees. The Washington-based Partnership for Public Service is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that encourages young people to pursue careers in the federal government.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | August 11, 2013
Elections have consequences. People who attain political power daily make decisions that affect citizens in myriad ways, some not so obvious. For example, one of the more underanalyzed (but long lasting) consequences of a re-elected Barack Obama is the ongoing expansion of federal control, overseen by an administration intent on federalizing just about anything standing in its way. No halfway-interested citizen can claim surprise. This president's life is a model of progressive activism, from Harvard Law School to (Chicago)
NEWS
July 15, 2014
We thank the nameless graffiti artist in Carroll County who spray painted a denunciation of an aborted plan to house some of the thousands of unaccompanied minors who have crossed the southern U.S. border in recent months at a military facility near Westminster. He or she has told us all we need to know about what's driving the furor over these children. No, we're not going to harp on the first part of the message — "No illeagles here" — and claim that stupidity is at the heart of things.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2014
Back in April, it seemed like a win-win deal. The federal government, with a workforce that has grown increasingly dissatisfied with training opportunities, negotiated a first-of-its-kind program: A Maryland college that caters to non-traditional students online would grant a big tuition discount for all 2.2 million federal workers — 25 percent off all undergraduate courses and most graduate courses — plus their spouses and legal dependents....
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.