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NEWS
September 2, 2011
Whether it's a hurricane, a flood, a tornado or an earthquake, Americans count on the Federal Emergency Management Agency to be among the first responders. As the recent example of Hurricane Irene shows, only government can marshal the vast resources needed to quickly bring relief to victims of major disasters, then oversee cleanup and reconstruction efforts in the aftermath. That's why a looming partisan fight in Congress over whether to replenish FEMA's disaster relief account must not be allowed to cripple the agency's ability to carry out its life-saving mission.
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NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
Maryland will receive federal disaster funding to help pay for snow-clearing efforts from a February storm that left a foot and a half of accumulation across parts of the region in a single day, the Federal Emergency Management Agency announced Thursday. No cost estimate from the storm has been released by the state, so it isn't clear how much funding Maryland could get. The funding, distributed through the state, will assist eligible local governments and nonprofits "on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work in Baltimore, Carroll and Howard counties," according to FEMA.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2011
Anne Arundel County's highway bureau will receive $1.5 million in federal aid to reimburse local taxpayers for money spent clearing snow from last February's snowstorms. The assistance from the Federal Emergency Management Agency represents 75 percent of the county's expenditures. It is part of more than $82 million that FEMA has provided for Maryland following federal disaster declarations during last year's severe winter weather. Maryland weather blog: Frank Roylance on meteorology Sign up for FREE mobile weather alerts
NEWS
By Todd Eberly | May 17, 2013
It has been a rough week or so for the Obama administration. From Benghazi to the tapping of reporters' phones to the IRS admitting that it targeted conservative groups for extra scrutiny, the press is in a frenzy, and many are questioning President Barack Obama's future. If the president does not soon regain control of the narrative, he is likely to suffer the same fate as his predecessor - a collapse in public confidence and a vastly diminished second term. To understand President Obama's situation, we need to explore a little presidential theory and some recent presidential history.
EXPLORE
November 29, 2011
The city government will be able to use some reimbursement funds from the Federal Emergency Management Agency to cover certain costs incurred when the city was hit by Hurricane Irene in August. An emergency declaration put into effect by President Barack Obama authorized FEMA to provide appropriate assistance for costs of required emergency measures. Under this declaration, the city of Laurel was eligible to receive funds to cover overtime for employees, equipment used and materials and supplies.
NEWS
December 7, 2012
As much as I respect Dan Rodricks ' work as a columnist, his recent article castigating President Barack Obama for FEMA's decision to deny relief to Worcester and Dorchester counties was curiously conspiratorial ("No hurricane relief, and no good reason," Dec. 6). One would expect Mr. Rodricks to be knowledgeable about the Federal Emergency Management Agency's mandate and the damage thresholds that trigger eligibility for relief. For him to suggest that President Obama would personally direct or deny relief to any community based on political considerations is disappointing and uncharacteristic of Mr. Rodricks' body of work.
NEWS
September 8, 2011
The Congressional tea party caucus has not and will not withhold disaster relief funds from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and tea party members have already appropriated more FEMA funds for 2012 than were originally requested. But of course, those "insignificant" facts were never mentioned in your latest editorial attempt to discredit and disparage the GOP-led U.S. House of Representatives ("Shortchanging FEMA," Sept. 5). When The Sun publishes its daily partisan half-truths, it would do well to preface them with a disclaimer: "Read the following at your own risk, as our innuendo, distortions and outright lies may actually cause your head to explode.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2011
Baltimore County will receive more than $4 million in federal funds to help cover the costs of snow cleanup after the back-to-back blizzards in February last year. The assistance, approved Wednesday by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, will cover 75 percent of the county's spending on snow removal, including labor and overtime, road salt and contractor services. It represents a 75 percent federal share of the county's spending. FEMA officials said they had also approved more than $1 million in weather disaster assistance to the State Highway Administration, and almost $6.5 million to Montgomery County.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2012
President Barack Obama on Thursday declared a major disaster in Maryland following the storms and high winds of late June and early July, and ordered federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts in the areas affected. The deadly derecho that ripped through the state June 29 damaged buildings, utility lines and trees, leaving hundreds of thousands in Maryland without power. The disaster declaration covers the storms and winds from June 29 through July 8. Federal funding is now available to the state and local governments and some nonprofits for emergency work and repairs to facilities in Baltimore City and Calvert, Charles, Kent, Montgomery and St. Mary's counties.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
Maryland will receive federal disaster funding to help pay for snow-clearing efforts from a February storm that left a foot and a half of accumulation across parts of the region in a single day, the Federal Emergency Management Agency announced Thursday. No cost estimate from the storm has been released by the state, so it isn't clear how much funding Maryland could get. The funding, distributed through the state, will assist eligible local governments and nonprofits "on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work in Baltimore, Carroll and Howard counties," according to FEMA.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2012
Maryland's congressional delegation continued to press the Obama administration Friday to reconsider its decision to deny federal aid to Eastern Shore families hurt by superstorm Sandy as state leaders encouraged victims to report damage. In a letter Friday, Sens. Barbara A. Mikulski and Ben Cardin asked FEMA administrator Craig Fugate to "exercise flexibility" in determining whether residents in Somerset, Worcester and Dorchester counties should be eligible to apply for federal housing aid. Federal Emergency Management Agency officials determined this week that the damage in Maryland from the Oct. 29 storm was not extensive enough to justify assistance for several hundred families whose homes were affected.
NEWS
December 7, 2012
As much as I respect Dan Rodricks ' work as a columnist, his recent article castigating President Barack Obama for FEMA's decision to deny relief to Worcester and Dorchester counties was curiously conspiratorial ("No hurricane relief, and no good reason," Dec. 6). One would expect Mr. Rodricks to be knowledgeable about the Federal Emergency Management Agency's mandate and the damage thresholds that trigger eligibility for relief. For him to suggest that President Obama would personally direct or deny relief to any community based on political considerations is disappointing and uncharacteristic of Mr. Rodricks' body of work.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2012
President Barack Obama on Thursday declared a major disaster in Maryland following the storms and high winds of late June and early July, and ordered federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts in the areas affected. The deadly derecho that ripped through the state June 29 damaged buildings, utility lines and trees, leaving hundreds of thousands in Maryland without power. The disaster declaration covers the storms and winds from June 29 through July 8. Federal funding is now available to the state and local governments and some nonprofits for emergency work and repairs to facilities in Baltimore City and Calvert, Charles, Kent, Montgomery and St. Mary's counties.
EXPLORE
November 29, 2011
The city government will be able to use some reimbursement funds from the Federal Emergency Management Agency to cover certain costs incurred when the city was hit by Hurricane Irene in August. An emergency declaration put into effect by President Barack Obama authorized FEMA to provide appropriate assistance for costs of required emergency measures. Under this declaration, the city of Laurel was eligible to receive funds to cover overtime for employees, equipment used and materials and supplies.
NEWS
September 8, 2011
The Congressional tea party caucus has not and will not withhold disaster relief funds from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and tea party members have already appropriated more FEMA funds for 2012 than were originally requested. But of course, those "insignificant" facts were never mentioned in your latest editorial attempt to discredit and disparage the GOP-led U.S. House of Representatives ("Shortchanging FEMA," Sept. 5). When The Sun publishes its daily partisan half-truths, it would do well to preface them with a disclaimer: "Read the following at your own risk, as our innuendo, distortions and outright lies may actually cause your head to explode.
NEWS
September 2, 2011
Whether it's a hurricane, a flood, a tornado or an earthquake, Americans count on the Federal Emergency Management Agency to be among the first responders. As the recent example of Hurricane Irene shows, only government can marshal the vast resources needed to quickly bring relief to victims of major disasters, then oversee cleanup and reconstruction efforts in the aftermath. That's why a looming partisan fight in Congress over whether to replenish FEMA's disaster relief account must not be allowed to cripple the agency's ability to carry out its life-saving mission.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2012
Maryland's congressional delegation continued to press the Obama administration Friday to reconsider its decision to deny federal aid to Eastern Shore families hurt by superstorm Sandy as state leaders encouraged victims to report damage. In a letter Friday, Sens. Barbara A. Mikulski and Ben Cardin asked FEMA administrator Craig Fugate to "exercise flexibility" in determining whether residents in Somerset, Worcester and Dorchester counties should be eligible to apply for federal housing aid. Federal Emergency Management Agency officials determined this week that the damage in Maryland from the Oct. 29 storm was not extensive enough to justify assistance for several hundred families whose homes were affected.
NEWS
By Todd Eberly | May 17, 2013
It has been a rough week or so for the Obama administration. From Benghazi to the tapping of reporters' phones to the IRS admitting that it targeted conservative groups for extra scrutiny, the press is in a frenzy, and many are questioning President Barack Obama's future. If the president does not soon regain control of the narrative, he is likely to suffer the same fate as his predecessor - a collapse in public confidence and a vastly diminished second term. To understand President Obama's situation, we need to explore a little presidential theory and some recent presidential history.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2011
Anne Arundel County's highway bureau will receive $1.5 million in federal aid to reimburse local taxpayers for money spent clearing snow from last February's snowstorms. The assistance from the Federal Emergency Management Agency represents 75 percent of the county's expenditures. It is part of more than $82 million that FEMA has provided for Maryland following federal disaster declarations during last year's severe winter weather. Maryland weather blog: Frank Roylance on meteorology Sign up for FREE mobile weather alerts
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2011
Baltimore County will receive more than $4 million in federal funds to help cover the costs of snow cleanup after the back-to-back blizzards in February last year. The assistance, approved Wednesday by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, will cover 75 percent of the county's spending on snow removal, including labor and overtime, road salt and contractor services. It represents a 75 percent federal share of the county's spending. FEMA officials said they had also approved more than $1 million in weather disaster assistance to the State Highway Administration, and almost $6.5 million to Montgomery County.
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