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By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau | September 3, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Saying that the people of Florida have been "victimized twice," first by a killer hurricane and then by a slow federal government, Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski is calling for an overhaul of federal disaster relief policy.Ms. Mikulski, chairwoman of the Senate spending subcommittee that oversees the beleaguered Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), will ask for a study of the government's disaster policy that will serve as a blueprint for legislation next year."The human tragedy is truly intolerable, because the people of South Florida have been victimized twice," the Maryland Democrat said in a statement, noting that the hurricane could not have been controlled.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2012
A Maryland woman pleaded guilty Tuesday to embezzling more than $143,000 from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, where she worked as a human resources analyst, according to the Maryland U.S. attorney's office. Sheila Ann Howard, 56, of Capitol Heights in Prince George's County, began working for FEMA — which responds to disasters across the country such as the recent devastation from superstorm Sandy — as a disaster assistant in 1986, and later served as a staffing clerk and personal assistant, among other positions, prosecutors said.
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NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 18, 2006
GULFPORT, Miss. -- Federal emergency officials say they have improved the logistics, communication and equipment problems that were exposed by Hurricanes Katrina, Rita and Wilma last year. David Paulison, director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, told reporters in a conference call Friday that his office has worked since last hurricane season to fix the issues that left many people without help after devastating storms. "We have a lot of issues inside of FEMA," he said. "There were a lot of systems that were not in place and a lot of things that need to be fixed.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2012
Most roads were cleared of snow and fallen trees in Garrett County as of late Sunday, and most federal and state emergency officials who'd responded there following superstorm Sandy's damaging blizzard had departed. Still, thousands remained without power. "The only thing that's still lacking, as far as I understand it, is power restoration, and that's a slow, tedious process because of the damage that's been done and because of the vastness of Garrett County," said Jim Raley, chairman of the county's Board of Commissioners.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2001
It would have been a horrible wreck on Interstate 95 -- leaving a trail of twisted metal, shattered glass and broken bones. An Army captain and a crew of federal emergency workers would have been among the injured. Instead, the group watched as Anne Arundel County firefighter William "Artie" Cooper Jr. -- a paramedic suddenly turned stuntman -- aborted an impending chain of events and avoided a high-speed crash in a heroic act that was recognized last weekend at a national conference of emergency personnel in Dallas.
NEWS
By Edmund L. Andrews and Edmund L. Andrews,New York Times News Service | August 27, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Hurricane Andrew poses a daunting test for the agency that coordinates federal disaster relief programs, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which was criticized for its lack of preparation in responding to Hurricane Hugo and the earthquake in Northern California three years ago.Acknowledging that the agency was overwhelmed by the back-to-back disasters in 1989, officials of the agency yesterday outlined a broad effort to ship in food,...
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Laura Barnhardt and Linda Linley and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2003
In raucous meetings yesterday and last night, hundreds of residents of eastern Baltimore County packed the Bowleys Quarters Volunteer Fire Department hall and Sparrows Point High School, demanding that federal, state and local officials give them answers needed to rebuild their lives and homes in the wake of Tropical Storm Isabel. Many in the crowd at Bowleys Quarters have been living for seven days in flood- and oil-soaked homes, without electricity, telephones and plumbing after Isabel's devastating storm surge flooded much of the east side's bay front.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2003
For almost a year, Howard County's Community Emergency Response Network, a committee of law enforcement agencies, nonprofits and other groups, has worked with Howard institutions to develop emergency response plans, given the county's proximity to potential terrorist targets. Now, the group, called CERN for short, is taking on an additional responsibility: leading the county's new Citizen Corps, a volunteer force that will receive Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) training to respond to potential disasters.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | November 25, 1996
FISHING CREEK -- It would be hard to find a place in Maryland more remote than the three mismatched pieces of land known as Hooper Island.It would be hard, too, to find a house or an outbuilding here not damaged by Hurricane Fran, which struck this small, close-knit community on Sept. 6. The storm shifted sea walls, tore chunks of land from the waterfront, flooded houses and stranded residents -- the worst display of natural fury many residents can remember.Two months later, homeowners here are still hoping state, federal and local agencies will help them repair and rebuild.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS and MELISSA HARRIS,SUN REPORTER | February 11, 2006
EMMITSBURG -- In a mock command center at a former Catholic women's college, leaders of "Central City" hustle to respond after a hurricane sends the "Roaring River" into downtown, flooding businesses and the city's 911 center. Frazzled town managers pick up ringing phones, knowing that callers want the impossible. Irate business owners chide officials on television for incompetence, and residents complain on a radio talk show about everything from the overflowing sewer system to the washed-out veterans' cemetery.
NEWS
September 2, 2011
Whether it's a hurricane, a flood, a tornado or an earthquake, Americans count on the Federal Emergency Management Agency to be among the first responders. As the recent example of Hurricane Irene shows, only government can marshal the vast resources needed to quickly bring relief to victims of major disasters, then oversee cleanup and reconstruction efforts in the aftermath. That's why a looming partisan fight in Congress over whether to replenish FEMA's disaster relief account must not be allowed to cripple the agency's ability to carry out its life-saving mission.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 18, 2006
GULFPORT, Miss. -- Federal emergency officials say they have improved the logistics, communication and equipment problems that were exposed by Hurricanes Katrina, Rita and Wilma last year. David Paulison, director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, told reporters in a conference call Friday that his office has worked since last hurricane season to fix the issues that left many people without help after devastating storms. "We have a lot of issues inside of FEMA," he said. "There were a lot of systems that were not in place and a lot of things that need to be fixed.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS and MELISSA HARRIS,SUN REPORTER | February 11, 2006
EMMITSBURG -- In a mock command center at a former Catholic women's college, leaders of "Central City" hustle to respond after a hurricane sends the "Roaring River" into downtown, flooding businesses and the city's 911 center. Frazzled town managers pick up ringing phones, knowing that callers want the impossible. Irate business owners chide officials on television for incompetence, and residents complain on a radio talk show about everything from the overflowing sewer system to the washed-out veterans' cemetery.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS | September 30, 2005
This week, President Bush urged all of us - especially federal workers - to conserve. Turn off the computers, air-conditioning and lights at night, he said. Use mass transit, carpool or work closer to home. But many federal workers didn't hear a call to action. Rather, they heard irony. Despite years of efforts to encourage federal employees to work from home or suburban offices, to save fuel and help keep government running during disasters, more than half of managers disfavor so-called "telework" initiatives, according to a private-sector survey of almost 300 federal workers published this year.
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Laura Barnhardt and Linda Linley and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2003
In raucous meetings yesterday and last night, hundreds of residents of eastern Baltimore County packed the Bowleys Quarters Volunteer Fire Department hall and Sparrows Point High School, demanding that federal, state and local officials give them answers needed to rebuild their lives and homes in the wake of Tropical Storm Isabel. Many in the crowd at Bowleys Quarters have been living for seven days in flood- and oil-soaked homes, without electricity, telephones and plumbing after Isabel's devastating storm surge flooded much of the east side's bay front.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2003
For almost a year, Howard County's Community Emergency Response Network, a committee of law enforcement agencies, nonprofits and other groups, has worked with Howard institutions to develop emergency response plans, given the county's proximity to potential terrorist targets. Now, the group, called CERN for short, is taking on an additional responsibility: leading the county's new Citizen Corps, a volunteer force that will receive Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) training to respond to potential disasters.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS | September 30, 2005
This week, President Bush urged all of us - especially federal workers - to conserve. Turn off the computers, air-conditioning and lights at night, he said. Use mass transit, carpool or work closer to home. But many federal workers didn't hear a call to action. Rather, they heard irony. Despite years of efforts to encourage federal employees to work from home or suburban offices, to save fuel and help keep government running during disasters, more than half of managers disfavor so-called "telework" initiatives, according to a private-sector survey of almost 300 federal workers published this year.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2001
It would have been a horrible wreck on Interstate 95 -- leaving a trail of twisted metal, shattered glass and broken bones. An Army captain and a crew of federal emergency workers would have been among the injured. Instead, the group watched as Anne Arundel County firefighter William "Artie" Cooper Jr. -- a paramedic suddenly turned stuntman -- aborted an impending chain of events and avoided a high-speed crash in a heroic act that was recognized last weekend at a national conference of emergency personnel in Dallas.
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