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By Wendell Cochran | December 29, 1996
When Congress created the Federal Election Commission in the wake of Watergate more than two decades ago, one hope was that better disclosure would limit abuses of money in politics. There is little question that the FEC, although understaffed and starved of resources by Congress, helps journalists, public interest groups, political challengers and citizens to learn more about campaign cash.However, anyone who has spent much time with FEC records knows there are serious shortcomings in the disclosure system.
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NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2013
— The Federal Election Commission deadlocked Thursday over a proposal by the Democratic Governors Association to set up an organization that could engage in federal elections — a result that effectively permits the new group to go forward. After a series of meetings and hours of debate, the five members of the commission wound up in essentially the same position they began: a de facto party-line vote that will allow the DGA to create a group called Jobs & Opportunity that will expand its electoral reach.
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NEWS
October 22, 2002
Only 69.2 percent of Maryland residents who are eligible to vote are registered. This is the seventh-lowest in the nation among the 48 states that require voters to register before election day. The national average is 76 percent. Percent of eligible State ........................voters registered..................Rank Arizona..............................59.9................................48 Wyoming............................61.5................................47 California.....
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2012
Democratic challenger John Delaney outraised longtime Republican Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett by a 6-to-1 margin in the first half of October and had more cash on hand going into the final weeks of the campaign, according to figures released by the Federal Election Commission. In the state's most competitive congressional race, Delaney raised more than $251,000 between Oct. 1 and Oct.17 — a period that included a Washington fundraiser headlined by former President Bill Clinton. Delaney, a Montgomery County banker, had $173,000 on hand.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | December 17, 1994
WASHINGTON -- This year's congressional races were the costliest in history, the chairman of the Federal Election Commission said yesterday.Preliminary tallies of reports on money spent through Nov. 28 by general election candidates showed "the largest numbers ever," Trevor Potter said. With more than 90 percent of the post-election reports in, the study showed:* Spending by Senate and House candidates who survived primaries was $596 million -- up 17 percent from 1992, 50 percent from 1990.
NEWS
By TRICIA BISHOP | July 16, 2006
For the year's second quarter, John P. Sarbanes raised more funds than his Democratic competitors in the 3rd Congressional District race, according to paperwork filed yesterday with the Federal Election Commission. Sarbanes, son of incumbent U.S. Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes, raised $303,050 this quarter and has $585,465 on hand. In second place is state Sen. Paula C. Hollinger, a Pikesville Democrat who collected $193,000, with $271,000 on hand. Former Baltimore Health Commissioner Dr. Peter L. Beilenson took in $136,690, with $291,538 on hand, while businessman Oz Bengur reported $132,132 and has $121,259 on hand.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 24, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In a development that could directly affect whether some Republican presidential candidates make it through the crucial first stage of the primary season, the Federal Election Commission is expecting a shortfall of as much of $15 million in the matching funds that candidates are expecting to receive early next year.While the amount of the deficit depends on how much the campaigns request by the end of this year, commission officials say the Treasury Department will have only $22.5 million to dispense in January.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | June 27, 2008
WASHINGTON - Wealthy political candidates caught a break yesterday as the Supreme Court struck down a campaign finance rule that benefits their opponents. By 5-4, the court ruled that Congress went too far when it loosened fundraising restraints for politicians facing millionaires who invest in their own campaigns. The court's majority declared that the campaign finance double standard violated First Amendment free-speech guarantees. "The argument that a candidate's speech may be restricted in order to level electoral opportunity has ominous implications because it would permit Congress to arrogate the voters' authority to evaluate the strength of candidates competing for office," Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. wrote for the majority.
NEWS
By Jim Payne and Jim Payne,Capital News Service | March 12, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Western Maryland's tumultuous congressional race ended in November, but campaign debt continues to haunt Roscoe G. Bartlett and Thomas Hattery.Federal Election Commission records show the Hattery For Congress Committee ended 1992 owing $57,517.94. Mr. Bartlett's campaign reported a debt of $65,485.73. Neither candidate has reduced his debt since the year-end report.Personal loans the candidates made to their own election committees make up almost all of the debt. There is no limit to the amount candidates can contribute to their campaigns.
NEWS
By Jim Payne and Jim Payne,Capital News Service | March 12, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Western Maryland's tumultuous congressional race ended in November, but campaign debt continues to haunt Roscoe G. Bartlett and Thomas Hattery.Federal Election Commission records show the Hattery For Congress Committee ended 1992 owing $57,517.94, while Mr. Bartlett's campaign reported a debt of $65,485.73. Neither candidate has reduced his debt since the year-end report, they said.Personal loans the candidates made to their own election committees make up almost all of the debt.
NEWS
February 23, 2012
Think money doesn't talk? Try telling that to this year's GOP presidential hopefuls, whose fates are more than ever tied to a handful of wealthy donors who bankroll the super PACs that raise and spend unlimited amounts of cash on their behalf. Campaign finance reports submitted to the Federal Election Commission this week showed that just 23 big donors contributed $53 million to the super PACs supporting Mitt Romney, Rick Santorum, Newt Gingrich and Ron Paul. That was more than the total amount raised by all the candidates' campaigns combined, where the limit on contributions by individuals is just $2,500.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | February 15, 2012
How many billionaires does it take to buy a presidential election? We're about to find out. The 2012 campaign is likely to be a battle between one group of millionaires and billionaires supporting President Barack Obama and another group supporting his GOP rival. Perhaps this was the inevitable result of the Supreme Court's grotesque decision in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission in 2010, which opened the floodgates to unrestricted campaign money through so-called "super PACs.
NEWS
January 21, 2012
It has been two years since the Supreme Court issued its decision in the case Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, and we are only now just beginning to see how its overturning of a century of campaign finance law is distorting the electoral process. Rather than acting truly independently of campaigns, as the majority of justices envisioned, these entities exclusively act on behalf of individual candidates - and are typically run by former aides. Rather than encouraging the universal right of free speech, the ruling has had the effect of providing a megaphone for the rich to drown out all other voices.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2011
A Baltimore developer has paid a $55,000 fine to settle a case in which the Federal Election Commission found the company used corporate funds to make campaign contributions in the names of company executives during the 2006 election cycle. Edward St. John, chairman and owner of St. John Properties Inc., agreed to pay the civil penalty after the commission found that political contributions by six senior vice presidents, who were later reimbursed by the company, violated laws that prohibit corporations from using general funds to help elect candidates to federal office, the FEC reported.
NEWS
By Paul West, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2010
The national Republican Party and a pair of newly organized conservative operations are pouring hundreds of thousands of dollars into attack ads against Democratic Rep. Frank Kratovil in the increasingly negative fight for Maryland's easternmost House district. Republican challenger Andy Harris, a veteran state lawmaker from Baltimore's northern suburbs, is again opposing Kratovil, an endangered Democratic freshman from the Eastern Shore. The House Democratic campaign committee was the first to enter the general election with attack ads aimed at district voters.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,Sun reporter | July 22, 2008
Sen. John McCain is scheduled to arrive in Baltimore this evening for his first high-profile fundraising visit to Maryland since becoming the presumptive Republican nominee, the latest foray by a presidential candidate mining the state's steady supply of campaign cash. Tonight's reception at the Center Club downtown will be hosted by former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and marks perhaps his most visible effort in McCain's behalf to date. Political analysts don't expect McCain to fare well against Democrat Barack Obama in Maryland, where Democrats outnumber Republicans roughly 2-to-1.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | August 5, 1996
THE SURPRISE IN the Federal Election Commission (FEC) lawsuit against the Christian Coalition for allegedly crossing the line dividing voter education from political partisanship is not the suit itself, but that it has taken so long.Since religious conservatives became active in politics in the late 1970s, many liberal coalitions have been trying to intimidate them and invalidate their full participation in the political process.The FEC objects to the "scorecards" the Christian coalition distributes, saying they "express advocacy" for certain candidates and should be reported as "in kind" contributions to those candidates or as independent expenditures.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Staff Writer | February 5, 1994
Bolstered by 43 contributions of $1,000 each, Baltimore County Del. Gerry L. Brewster leads the money-raising contest among those planning to run for Maryland's 2nd Congressional District seat this year.The Towson Democrat has raised $60,743 and still had $57,209 on hand Dec. 31, according to the report his campaign filed with the Federal Election Commission.His most prominent Republican counterpart, Baltimore County Del. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. has raised only $10,441, but hopes to enlarge his treasury by $30,000 with a $50-per-ticket fund-raiser tonight at the Dundalk Marine Terminal.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | June 27, 2008
WASHINGTON - Wealthy political candidates caught a break yesterday as the Supreme Court struck down a campaign finance rule that benefits their opponents. By 5-4, the court ruled that Congress went too far when it loosened fundraising restraints for politicians facing millionaires who invest in their own campaigns. The court's majority declared that the campaign finance double standard violated First Amendment free-speech guarantees. "The argument that a candidate's speech may be restricted in order to level electoral opportunity has ominous implications because it would permit Congress to arrogate the voters' authority to evaluate the strength of candidates competing for office," Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. wrote for the majority.
NEWS
By TRICIA BISHOP | July 16, 2006
For the year's second quarter, John P. Sarbanes raised more funds than his Democratic competitors in the 3rd Congressional District race, according to paperwork filed yesterday with the Federal Election Commission. Sarbanes, son of incumbent U.S. Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes, raised $303,050 this quarter and has $585,465 on hand. In second place is state Sen. Paula C. Hollinger, a Pikesville Democrat who collected $193,000, with $271,000 on hand. Former Baltimore Health Commissioner Dr. Peter L. Beilenson took in $136,690, with $291,538 on hand, while businessman Oz Bengur reported $132,132 and has $121,259 on hand.
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