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NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | March 7, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The Senate Appropriations Committee approved yesterday several amendments to an omnibus spending bill that would provide as much as $25 million in federal disaster aid to help Marylanders recover from damage caused ** by this winter's storms and floods.Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, a Maryland Democrat and committee member, said the bill would include $16 million to $20 million to repair a portion of the washed-out C&O Canal in Montgomery County, and $2.5 million to repair roads and bridges in Allegany, Garrett, Frederick, Washington and Cecil counties.
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BUSINESS
October 22, 1998
The U.S. Department of Agriculture declared nine Southern Maryland and Eastern Shore counties that suffered severe drought damage this summer federal disaster areas yesterday.To qualify, the counties had to have posted at least a 30 percent loss of a major crop. The counties are: Anne Arundel, Calvert, Charles, Dorchester, Prince George's, St. Mary's, Somerset, Wicomico and Worcester.A disaster declaration makes farmers in those counties eligible to apply for low-interest loans to help finance next year's planting.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2013
Members of Maryland's congressional delegation asked the Obama administration Thursday to reconsider its decision to deny federal disaster aid to Garrett County residents walloped by an October snowstorm. In a letter to Federal Emergency Management Agency administrator W. Craig Fugate, the lawmakers said the weather system — produced by Hurricane Sandy — cut power to the county for a week and damaged 23 homes. "Garrett County was hit extremely hard by Hurricane Sandy, and the people of Western Maryland will remember this storm and the damage it did for a long time," said Rep. John Delaney, a Montgomery County lawmaker who signed the letter, along with Sens.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2010
Maryland will receive more than $15.4 million in federal disaster funds to help state and local governments and some private, non-profit organizations replenish funds expended during last winter's snow storms. The Federal Emergency Management Agency has obligated $14.1 million for costs incurred during the Dec. 18-20 blizzard, and another $1.3 million for expenditures during the Feb. 5-11 storms. Three-quarters of the funds will be made available right away, the agency said. The rest will follow as paperwork is processed.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2011
Baltimore County will receive more than $4 million in federal funds to help cover the costs of snow cleanup after the back-to-back blizzards in February last year. The assistance, approved Wednesday by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, will cover 75 percent of the county's spending on snow removal, including labor and overtime, road salt and contractor services. It represents a 75 percent federal share of the county's spending. FEMA officials said they had also approved more than $1 million in weather disaster assistance to the State Highway Administration, and almost $6.5 million to Montgomery County.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2011
The Federal Emergency Management Agency has added Baltimore and Baltimore County to the list of 13 Maryland counties eligible for federal disaster assistance in the wake of Hurricane Irene. FEMA and the Maryland Emergency Management Agency said the federal aid will support local recovery expenditures by state and local governments and some private, non-profit organizations. Eligible work includes the replacement and repair damaged roads, bridges, buildings, utilities, recreation areas and other public facilities.
NEWS
By Dan Chapman and Dan Chapman,COX NEWS SERVICE | March 10, 2002
PRINCEVILLE, N.C. - The dead sleep snugly again in the town cemetery. New white-sided homes shine in the warm winter's sun. Handfuls of young men are back dealing drugs by the railroad tracks. Madam Rose reads palms along Main Street. Princeville survived Hurricane Floyd, which in 1999 destroyed nearly every home, business and dream. But a wound festers. And because the nation has largely forgotten the hurricane - and Princeville - the town finds itself alone, struggling for its long-term recovery.
NEWS
By Frank Greve and Frank Greve,Knight-Ridder News ServiceKnight-Ridder News Service | August 27, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration's plan to reinvent government would force agencies to compete with private companies for much of their work, increase the independence of agency heads and eliminate the jobs of thousands of federal managers.A confidential 109-page draft of the plan obtained by Knight-Ridder News Service offers dozens of proposals, including promises that the U.S. Postal Service will deliver overnight local first-class mail, that the IRS will pay tax refunds within 21 days and that the Social Security Administration will answer its phones.
NEWS
By Richard Fausset and Richard Fausset,Tribune Newspapers | September 23, 2009
ATLANTA - -The state of Georgia faced continuing headaches and heartache Tuesday from a pernicious series of rainstorms that had claimed the lives of at least seven people and flooded more than 1,000 homes - although weather forecasters said the worst of the deluge likely had passed. On Tuesday morning, Gov. Sonny Perdue formally asked President Barack Obama for an emergency declaration that would make the hardest-hit areas eligible for federal disaster relief funds. A day earlier, Perdue had declared a state of emergency in 17 counties in the Atlanta area and North Georgia.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,Sun reporter | May 23, 2008
A legislative oversight committee approved tough new regulations yesterday aimed at restoring the Chesapeake Bay's blue crab population by significantly cutting the harvest of female crabs. The rules - approved over the protests of watermen and Eastern Shore lawmakers - mean the season for females will end Oct. 23, about two months early. The rules also impose limits on how many bushels of females watermen can catch. State officials said they had no choice but to impose stiff measures because the crab population has fallen precipitously.
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