Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFederal Case
IN THE NEWS

Federal Case

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | November 7, 2003
WHEN THE subpoena from the U.S. attorney's office arrived this week, City Councilwoman Lois Garey put the thing aside without opening it. She wanted to play with her grandchildren instead. This is known as an act of mental health. Also, it is a lesson in perspective for the entire City Council of Baltimore, 17 of whose members have acknowledged being hit with similar subpoenas and informed that their activities are under federal investigation. Among prosecutors' areas of interest? Well, there has been much talk of free tickets to 1st Mariner Arena.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2013
After leading a life of crime, being charged with murder and being shot, Howard McCray was ready for a change. In 2008, he began working with Maryland Shock Trauma Center, where he had been treated for gunshot wounds, to reach out to other victims who come through the hospital to help them reform. The work he did with Shock Trauma's Violence Prevention Program received national attention, with McCray appearing on CNN and National Public Radio. “I'm a changed man,” McCray said in the CNN segment.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Maryanne Trump Barry | March 14, 1994
A HEIGHTENED fear of crime is rampant in the United States today.In response, the House and Senate will soon consider final action on major crime legislation.It includes an extraordinary number of provisions, including one that would make many offenses -- for example, virtually any offense involving a firearm -- a federal crime.If enacted, the bill could swamp the federal courts with cases they are not properly equipped to handle.Before this happens, Congress should look long and hard at the effect it will have if so many crimes now prosecuted by the states are federalized.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2013
When FBI agents heard on a wiretap that a Baltimore police detective was preparing to make a drug arrest based on false information, according to court documents, they decided not to intervene. The arrest of Brenda Brown went forward, and so did the federal case against Kendell Richburg. Richburg pleaded guilty last month to armed drug conspiracy charges after prosecutors said he protected a drug-peddling informant in exchange for information he needed to make arrests. Four more officers have been suspended in connection with the investigation, sources told The Baltimore Sun last week.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Jamie Stiehm and Gail Gibson and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2002
The troubled Baltimore nightclub Emineo, which has been affiliated with professional boxer Hasim S. Rahman, is linked to a federal racketeering case in which several men are accused of running a crime ring involved with drug dealing, arson, witness tampering and attempted murder. One of the lead defendants in the case, Louis William Colvin, was the manager at Emineo until his arrest in April, and his father holds the club's liquor license, records show. On the day the racketeering charges were announced, authorities said federal agents had raided the South Calvert Street bar that morning, searching for business and financial papers related to the case.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2001
Calvin Woodard Jr. was a four-time convicted felon when police arrested him in December 1999 for striking his girlfriend with a .40- caliber Glock handgun - exactly the kind of career criminal prosecutors have hoped to bring down with beefed-up enforcement of federal gun laws. But in building a case against Woodard last year for illegally possessing a gun, federal prosecutors ended up prosecuting his girlfriend and drawing criticism from advocates for domestic violence victims. Joann L. Gilliam, 44, of Glen Burnie was sentenced to 30 months in federal prison March 22 for lying to the grand jury investigating the gun case against Woodard and trying to coax a friend into doing the same.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2002
Federal authorities charged the alleged ringleaders of one of West Baltimore's most violent drug gangs yesterday with carrying out the slayings of six people, including one man who prosecutors say was killed to prevent him from testifying about an earlier double homicide. Investigators said the gang, the Lexington Terrace Boys, used violence to target rival dealers, potential witnesses, deadbeat customers and any others who threatened the group's crack-cocaine business that has operated since 1999 from the Lexington Terrace and Edgar Allan Poe Homes public housing complexes.
NEWS
August 14, 2006
Jason Beau Moody's trial on murder charges wasn't postponed - it was on permanent hold for more than two years. The state of limbo was government-induced, an inordinate delay and all too common occurrence in Baltimore's courts. Some court officials have tried to grapple with the systemwide problem of repeat postponements, but inertia has set in. Mr. Moody's case, though not indicative of the worst abuse of the system, is a fine example of the redundancy of the problem. In September 2003, Mr. Moody was arrested and charged in the shooting death of his girlfriend's former husband, Kevin Shields, 26. The girlfriend pleaded guilty the following August as part of an agreement in which she would testify against the jailed Mr. Moody.
SPORTS
By Veronica Gorley Chufo and Alicia P.Q. Wittmeyer and Veronica Gorley Chufo and Alicia P.Q. Wittmeyer,NEWPORT NEWS DAILY PRESS | September 26, 2007
SUSSEX, Va. -- Michael Vick's legal woes compounded yesterday, when a Surry County grand jury indicted him and three associates on local charges related to dogfighting. About three hours after convening, the grand jury charged the suspended Atlanta Falcons quarterback with one count of promoting or engaging in dogfighting, and a count of beating, killing or causing dogs to fight. Both are felonies that carry sentences of up to five years in prison and fines of up to $2,500. "We are disappointed that these charges were filed in Surry County since it is the same conduct covered by the federal indictment for which Mr. Vick has already accepted full responsibility and pled guilty to in U.S. District Court," Billy Martin, an attorney for Vick, said in a statement after the indictments were announced.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | August 19, 1992
WASHINGTON -- To avoid conflict with New York prosecutors, Justice Department lawyers told a federal judge yesterday that they would defer their case against Clark M. Clifford and Robert A. Altman until the Manhattan district attorney's office completed its bank fraud case against them.But at a hearing, U.S. District Judge Joyce Hens Green did not accept the Justice Department's proposal to sort out the trial dates for Mr. Clifford and Mr. Altman.Judge Green has set a trial on the federal case in Washington for Oct. 26, although a judge in New York has scheduled the trial on the state charges to begin Oct. 22.Judge Green asked the prosecutors to submit additional legal papers assessing the effect of a federal trial on the New York prosecution and said she would decide at a hearing on Sept.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2013
A federal judge ruled Monday that claims by two former Anne Arundel County employees, who allege they lost their jobs because of retaliation by the administration of former County Executive John R. Leopold, can advance to trial. U.S. District Judge Catherine C. Blake threw out some parts of the lawsuits by Karla Hamner, a former spokeswoman for Leopold, and Joan Harris, who worked as a constituent services specialist during the executive's first term. But the judge "kept the crux of both of the cases" said John Singleton, an attorney representing both plaintiffs.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | June 14, 2012
A lawyer for John Merzbacher, the former Baltimore Catholic school teacher serving four life terms for child rape and sexual abuse, argued in a federal appeals court filing Thursday that his imprisoned client must be offered a plea deal, despite his convictions, or be released immediately. The claims refer to a U.S. District Court opinion handed down in 2010, saying that Merzbacher's constitutional rights were violated when his defense attorneys neglected to tell him about a 10-year plea offer before his 1995 trial on charges he attacked a Catholic Community middle school girl nearly two decades earlier.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2011
After years of watching Umar Burley beat various gun and drug charges, prosecutors have won a conviction in U.S. District Court with a 15-year prison term against the Baltimore drug dealer — part of a one-two-punch strategy between state and federal officials. But they could have gone for more, one local attorney said, raising questions about whether the "career offender" — who allegedly killed a police officer's father in a car crash last year — actually got off easy. "What I would expect to see, if this guy were as big of a head as he sounds, is a … plea to a charge with a maximum penalty of life," said Andrew White, a former federal prosecutor who is now in private practice.
NEWS
By Paul Schwartzman, Ruben Castaneda and Cheryl W. Thompson, The Washington Post | November 12, 2010
Just after 10:12 a.m. Friday, Leslie Johnson frantically phoned her husband, Jack B. Johnson, the Prince George's county executive. Two FBI agents were at the front door of their two-story brick colonial in Mitchellville. "Don't answer it," the county executive said, unaware that more agents were listening in. According to an FBI affidavit, Johnson ordered his wife to find and destroy a $100,000 check from a real estate developer that was hidden in a box of liquor. "Do you want me to put it down the toilet?"
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2010
A Baltimore judge dismissed Tuesday state charges filed against a man who had been acquitted of similar charges in federal court, calling the local indictments a "sham" prosecution that violated the defendant's constitutional protection against being tried twice for the same offense. On Oct. 3, 2008, a U.S. District Court jury found Lenny Lyle Cain not guilty of federal drug charges. Three weeks later, the state filed new charges against him, based on the same incidents and investigation, Baltimore Circuit Court Judge Paul A. Smith held in a 10-page opinion.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, Patuxent Publishing | May 5, 2010
Witnesses to a fatal shooting at a Halloween party last year at a $1.6 million Columbia mansion described a chaotic scene in which at least four fights broke out, partygoers passed guns through windows to avoid security and a bottle was cracked over a young man's head. These new details are contained in hundreds of pages of police investigative documents reviewed by the Howard County Times this week. Prosecutors provided the documents to defense attorneys in the case two weeks ago. The documents, based on interviews with more than 100 witnesses, also help explain why prosecutors say they were forced to drop murder and attempted-murder charges against two young men initially accused in the crime.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | January 12, 1993
NEW YORK -- A New York judge yesterday rejected Clark M. Clifford's bid to have state charges against him in the Bank of Credit & Commerce International scandal dismissed on the basis of his poor health.Mr. Clifford, a former secretary of defense and adviser to several presidents, and his law partner and protege, Robert A. Altman, are scheduled to go on trial Feb. 15 in New York state Supreme Court in Manhattan on charges of accepting a bribe and helping to conceal BCCI's ownership of U.S. banks from regulators.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | April 16, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The four Los Angeles police officers tried in the Rodney G. King beating case in federal court had, as all Americans do, a constitutional right not to be tried twice for the same crime -- but that right was never at stake in the federal case.The reason for that is a Supreme Court ruling in 1922 that permits a federal prosecution even after accused individuals have gone through a state trial, and won. The Los Angeles officers were mainly exonerated in a state trial last year.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2010
The man who police say was behind the wheel of a car that struck and killed the father of a Baltimore officer escaped conviction on federal gun charges last year — a rare exception, given federal prosecutors' reputation for closing cases. Umar Burley, 39, the suspected driver , and passenger Brent Matthews, 36, were ordered held without bond Thursday on drug charges in connection with the crash. City prosecutors say both men, accused of fleeing a drug arrest, could face manslaughter charges once the investigation is complete.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | March 16, 2010
Before he was locked up, Terrence "Squeaky" Richardson dealt drugs, randomly robbed people and killed his enemies as a leader of a "violent and notorious gang in Baltimore City," prosecutors said Monday during opening statements in a federal racketeering and drug conspiracy trial. And after he went to prison, they said, he ordered others to take care of business, directing them over mobile phones that were illegally smuggled into his cell. "This case is about gangs, drugs and violence," Assistant U.S. Attorney Kwame Manley said in a repeated refrain Monday.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.