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NEWS
By Bill Thompson | January 15, 1999
REMEMBER this phrase: "smart growth."Just two little words. But they are about to become the defining battle cry in the next great showdown between liberals and conservatives.Maybe you thought that the conservative revolution was complete -- that the liberal philosophy of politics and government had been vanquished, had been consigned to the trash heap of history. Didn't President Clinton declare not long ago that the era of big government was over?Didn't Mr. Clinton support welfare reform, reduction of the federal bureaucracy, even tax cuts?
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NEWS
June 24, 2014
What's going on here? First it's the Internal Revenue Service harassing and intimidating minority political organizations. And now it's the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office trying to act as judge and jury regarding the ongoing debate over the use of the Washington Redskins team name ( "Washington's offensive line," June 20). This is apparently the brave new world of American democracy. Special interest groups now look to resolve any issue in their favor by raising a strident clamor and then look forward expectantly as a federal bureaucracy, obscure or not, resolves everything in their favor.
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NEWS
By Ned Martel and Ned Martel,States News Service | September 1, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Like beachfront property owners expecting a big storm, federal employee union leaders are taking precautions against Hurricane RE-GO -- as bureaucrats have dubbed the Reinventing Government report Vice President Al Gore will release next week.Union officials will have a private briefing with Mr. Gore tomorrow. The vice president has spent the summer evaluating the federal bureaucracy, and is under increasing pressure to cut workplace and work force expenses and improve services at the same time.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,Special to the Sun | August 10, 2008
The Wrecking Crew: How Conservatives Rule By Thomas Frank Metropolitan Books / 288 pages / $25 If you like muckrakers, Michael Moore and moveon.org, you'll like Thomas Frank. The author of What's the Matter with Kansas?, an explanation of how conservatives use "the cultural issues" to get Americans to vote against their economic interests, Frank is a hell-raising populist with a University of Chicago doctorate. He'd like to run over every right-wing Republican he runs across. In The Wrecking Crew, Frank contends that conservatives, using "bad ideas that still chew through the nation's brain," are well on the way to installing "a free market utopia."
NEWS
By Carol Emert and Carol Emert,States News Service | October 28, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The federal bureaucracy, which often is criticized as bloated and cumbersome, is actually smaller than it was 50 years ago.And the number of people on the federal payroll shrank between 1990 and 1991, according to a report released last week by the U.S. Department of Commerce.Federal civilian employment peaked during World War II at 3.4 million, but was reduced to 2 million by 1947, according to the report, "Public Employment: 1991." By 1951, it was back up to 2.5 million and tallied between 2.8 million and 3 million until 1984.
NEWS
June 24, 2014
What's going on here? First it's the Internal Revenue Service harassing and intimidating minority political organizations. And now it's the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office trying to act as judge and jury regarding the ongoing debate over the use of the Washington Redskins team name ( "Washington's offensive line," June 20). This is apparently the brave new world of American democracy. Special interest groups now look to resolve any issue in their favor by raising a strident clamor and then look forward expectantly as a federal bureaucracy, obscure or not, resolves everything in their favor.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Contributing writer | January 6, 1991
In an out-of-the-way crook of Aberdeen Proving Ground is a collection of warehouses and storage yards jammed with items from machines to tires that Uncle Sam no longer finds useful.There are smashed-up Plymouth station wagons, camouflage trailers, scientific lab equipment, military uniforms and dozens of personal computers.Scrap tank parts, 6-foot, 320-watt fans and sophisticated stereo equipment can be found, too."We have just about everything here but the kitchen sink," said Audrey Cremeans, a property distribution specialist who is one of 23 people who receive, sort, catalog, distribute and sell the thousands of no-longer-used items returned here frommilitary bases and other national agencies.
NEWS
November 28, 1992
Some of the most familiar pairings in American annals migh not have prospered had the names been reversed.Roebuck and Sears.Costello and Abbott.Jill and Jack.A debate is now raging in corporate offices, think-tanks and government chambers over whether to call the new combined "common market" in this region the "Baltimore-Washington" metropolitan area, or the "Washington-Baltimore" area.Because the populace in the two regions ostensibly has more in common now, and because business leaders feel the consolidation would attract more international business and government aid to these parts, federal officials are expected to combine the two metropolitan areas into a single mega-market, on paper, by year's end.Fortunately, one criteria that the U.S. Office of Management and Budget does not use in deciding whether two metropolises merit a common market is how smoothly they decide whose name goes first.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | September 8, 1993
WASHINGTON -- All the political wise guys hereabouts are pooh-poohing Vice President Al Gore's extensive report on how the federal government can be reformed -- "reinvented" is the current hyperbole -- by folding, spindling and sometimes mutilating existing functions and agencies.The claim that taxpayers can be saved a not inconsiderable $108 billion over a five-year period if all the recommendations are carried out is being widely cast as another pipe dream, in the class of Jimmy Carter's pledge in 1976 to reduce the federal bureaucracy from 1,900 agencies to 200, or the Grace Commission recommendations under Ronald Reagan, both of which came to little.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2001
Sitting elbow to elbow with President Bush yesterday, Gov. Parris N. Glendening warned that his proposed $1.6 trillion tax cut over 10 years was too large and would harm education programs and prescription drug coverage. His remarks, broadcast live on national television from the East Room of the White House where the National Governors' Association met with the president, came on the eve of Bush's first budget presentation to Congress. The timing was lost on no one, least of all Bush, who spoke before Glendening and softly lobbied the governors to endorse his tax plan.
NEWS
By Tara Sonenshine | September 9, 2005
WASHINGTON - Tragedies often bring out the truth, shining a light on the darkest of corners, laying bare the most basic of issues. So may be the case with Hurricane Katrina. The nightmare in Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama will force Americans to confront hard questions about how we lead our lives, at home and abroad. For the moment, attention is rightly focused on the physical acts of survival. But as the water recedes and life-and-death decisions get made, some bigger truths will need to be stared down: Quality of life.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 17, 2004
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. -- As President Bush and his campaign team rev up their campaign for a race to the finish, they hope to revive the image of the likable, ordinary-guy president whose calm leadership soothed the country after the Sept. 11 attacks before he went to war in Afghanistan and Iraq. At the same time, the president plans to intensify his criticism of John Kerry, continuing to portray the Democratic candidate as a "Massachusetts liberal" whose views put him outside the mainstream.
NEWS
By Stephens Broening and Stephens Broening,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 1, 2004
President Bush had little to say about terrorism in public during the 7 1/2 months between his inauguration and al-Qaida's devastating attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. In very few of the hundreds of speeches, photo ops, news conferences, communiques, statements, radio addresses and other remarks on record at the White House did he mention the menace of terrorism. When he did, he was likely to frame the problem of U.S. national security as one that might involve a "rogue state" attempting to blackmail the United States with weapons of mass destruction.
NEWS
April 3, 2002
Bureaucratic `beast' enhances our lives and protects citizens I wonder why The Sun gave space to Crispin Sartwell's silly diatribe about the federal bureaucracy ("The bureaucratic beast spits out only stupidity," Opinion Commentary, March 18). Mr. Sartwell's thesis that "every government bureaucracy that deals with the public is a huge, lumbering tribute to human ingenuity in making our lives impossible" is out of touch with reality. I have been around for six decades and have never found my life impossible or controlled on a day-to-day basis by these systems of power.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2001
Sitting elbow to elbow with President Bush yesterday, Gov. Parris N. Glendening warned that his proposed $1.6 trillion tax cut over 10 years was too large and would harm education programs and prescription drug coverage. His remarks, broadcast live on national television from the East Room of the White House where the National Governors' Association met with the president, came on the eve of Bush's first budget presentation to Congress. The timing was lost on no one, least of all Bush, who spoke before Glendening and softly lobbied the governors to endorse his tax plan.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 27, 2000
WASHINGTON - Ever since Al Gore smashed an ashtray on David Letterman's show a few years ago to dramatize what was wrong with the federal bureaucracy, the vice president's "Reinventing Government" initiative has achieved some of its goals - from improving the Social Security Administration's customer service hotline to helping citizens file income taxes online. What it hasn't done, many analysts say, is what Gore continues to claim it has: cut 300,000 federal jobs. Trying to shake the "big spender" label his rival has tried to tag him with, Gore declared this week that, "for eight years now, I've worked to reduce the size of government."
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | April 25, 1993
Renovations to turn two vacant buildings at Rosewood Center in Owings Mills into transitional housing for up to 23 homeless Baltimore County women and their children are scheduled to begin next week.The center, similar to units operating in Baltimore City and Anne Arundel County, will offer women and their youngsters housing while they receive guidance and job training.Drug counseling and other services to prepare them to enter the work force will be offered, said Frank W. Welsh, county director of community development.
NEWS
By Tara Sonenshine | September 9, 2005
WASHINGTON - Tragedies often bring out the truth, shining a light on the darkest of corners, laying bare the most basic of issues. So may be the case with Hurricane Katrina. The nightmare in Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama will force Americans to confront hard questions about how we lead our lives, at home and abroad. For the moment, attention is rightly focused on the physical acts of survival. But as the water recedes and life-and-death decisions get made, some bigger truths will need to be stared down: Quality of life.
NEWS
By Bill Thompson | January 15, 1999
REMEMBER this phrase: "smart growth."Just two little words. But they are about to become the defining battle cry in the next great showdown between liberals and conservatives.Maybe you thought that the conservative revolution was complete -- that the liberal philosophy of politics and government had been vanquished, had been consigned to the trash heap of history. Didn't President Clinton declare not long ago that the era of big government was over?Didn't Mr. Clinton support welfare reform, reduction of the federal bureaucracy, even tax cuts?
FEATURES
By M. R. Montgomery and M. R. Montgomery,Boston Globe | July 14, 1994
This modest, wise, small book would perhaps escape attention were it not for the incredible boom in tourism to the remote Four Corners territory of the Southwest. So be it: If the lost time and lost land described in this autobiographical essay have been irrevocably changed by modernity and motor vehicles, tourism and telephones, Edward T. Hall's memoir of a time and space lost forever will at least be read by people who have already acquired a taste for Navajo and Hopi country.For tourists who have gotten their hands on the excellent California Automobile Association travel map of the southwest Indian country, "West of the Thirties," will provide an unusual additional guide, an authentic example of that rarest commodity -- truth about how it was. Mr. Hall, before beginning a long career in anthropology (pioneering the field of nonverbal communication)
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