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NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1997
Three more workers at the George H. Fallon Federal Building were treated at hospitals yesterday after complaining of noxious fumes, but government officials who run the building say they found no evidence of a problem.City fire investigators attribute the complaints of chest pains, breathing problems, teary eyes and nausea by 18 people since Thursday to glue used to install carpeting on the upper floors.But a spokesman for the General Services Administration, which runs federal office buildings, said yesterday that extensive tests are inconclusive and do not point to the renovation, which continued yesterday.
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NEWS
August 23, 2010
The debate about the location of a mosque in New York City has reached a point beyond ridiculous and has become a dangerous example of the intolerance of American citizens. Equating an entire religion with terrorism is ignorance and bigotry. Think back several years ago when the federal building in Oklahoma City was bombed by Timothy McVeigh, a man who was raised as a Christian. I don't recall any outrage or debate about the proximity of Christian churches to the bombing site. I don't recall anyone stating that Christian churches near the site would be an insult to the memory of the people who died there.
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NEWS
By Pam Belluck and Pam Belluck,New York Times News Service | May 17, 1995
OKLAHOMA CITY -- Timothy McVeigh has claimed responsibility for the Oklahoma City bombing, according to two people who have talked with him in jail since his arrest.He has told them that the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building was chosen as a target because it housed so many government offices and because it was more architecturally vulnerable than other federal buildings, the two people said.Mr. McVeigh has also said he did not know there was a day-care center in the building and was surprised when he learned from newspapers that children had died in the bombing, according to these two people, who spoke on the condition of anonymity.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | May 24, 2004
Alice Aycock is a New York-based artist known for creating semi-architectural projects that are often interwoven with large-scale public buildings. Her latest creation, an aluminum sculpture called Swing Over, can be seen above the entrance to the George H. Fallon Federal Building at 31 Hopkins Plaza in downtown Baltimore. Commissioned in 1997 by the federal government and completed this month at a cost of $350,000, it suggests the flight patterns of two mating hummingbirds, or ballet dancers on stage.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | March 26, 1996
Federal agents didn't have to go far to round up another group of illegal immigrants yesterday: They found them working in the federal building in downtown Baltimore.The agents arrested a dozen immigrants removing asbestos from the Fallon Federal Building at Hopkins Plaza. All were certified by the state to remove asbestos, and all were carrying federal photo identification cards, giving them access to what is supposed to be a secure building."To find illegal immigrants working in a federal building is a bit of an irony," said Benedict J. Ferro, director of the Immigration and Naturalization Service in Maryland.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1997
An environmental consultant has been unable to pinpoint the cause of fumes that have been making workers ill at Baltimore's George H. Fallon Federal Building for the past month, but he believes he has hit on a way to make sure it doesn't happen again.On the recommendation of consultant Hugh Granger of HP Environmental Inc. in Herndon, Va., the ventilation system of the 17-story building at Lombard Street and Hopkins Plaza has been modified so that air moves from the lower floors -- where employees are -- to the top eight floors, where renovations were halted after the fumes started making people sick.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1997
The mysterious ill wind of the George H. Fallon Federal Building shifted to another floor and another office yesterday, sending eight more people to the hospital for a two-week total of 26. But it once again eluded baffled health investigators, who have yet to determine what it is, where it's from or where it might turn up next.Alfred DeLucia, regional spokesman for the building's government landlord, the General Services Administration, said that in his 18 years with the agency, "This is the first time in my experience where we've had air quality problems and have not picked up any readings."
NEWS
By D. Quentin Wilber and D. Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | September 15, 1997
How much noise do mating hummingbirds make?In downtown Baltimore, it appears they can cause quite a hum of protest, at least at the beleaguered George H. Fallon Building.PTC There, a $350,000 aluminum sculpture depicting the flight paths of two mating hummingbirds might be woven into the federal building's facade facing Hopkins Plaza. The proposed artwork has some employees protesting what they call wasteful government spending, especially in light of the building's past woes.The General Services Administration hasn't made a final recommendation on the piece, but on July 31, a community arts panel voted to recommend approval of the project.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | May 30, 1997
As an environmental detective of sorts, Hugh Granger has seen this kind of baffling case before. And after two weeks of testing, exploring, cleaning and venting by a variety of doctors, engineers and hygienists, he's developed a theory of what's been sending waves of people to the hospital during the past 15 days at the George H. Fallon Federal Building.The initial culprit, Granger believes, was fumes seeping into the first floor from outside, perhaps from resurfacing going on just outside the building.
NEWS
February 5, 1998
Taxpayers may get free help with their federal and state income tax returns tomorrow at two Baltimore offices.Internal Revenue Service and Maryland comptroller's office personnel will be in the lobby of the State Office Building in the 300 block of W. Preston St. and in the lobby of the Fallon Federal Building in Hopkins Plaza.The service will be available from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the State Office Building and from 8: 30 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the federal building.More than 200 taxpayers visited the offices when the service was provided Monday, according to state Comptroller Louis L. Goldstein.
NEWS
By Scott Gold and Scott Gold,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 1, 2004
McALESTER, Okla. - When Bill Rayburn says that death is the easy way out, folks around here tend to listen. At 87, Rayburn is old enough to remember how the Depression nearly snuffed out small towns like this. He nearly lost his life in the Battle of the Bulge, earned two Purple Hearts in three wars and has seen things on a battlefield that gentlemen don't speak about in public. Sure, he says, he wants to see Oklahoma City bombing conspirator Terry Nichols die. He just wants it to take a while.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 21, 2003
QUANTICO, VA. - At the center of a chilly, cavernous garage known as Evidence Bay 1284, Mohammed Atta's suitcase sits atop a table. It's a high-end Travelpro, barely used. On its handle the flight tag reads: American Airlines (Flight) #11. Los Angeles. Sept. 11, 2001. The suitcase waits here among hundreds of other remnants of the 2001 terrorist attacks at the FBI's national laboratory for investigators who come by every so often to examine it. Across the room are other items - boxes that read "hijacker keys," "hijacker bags," "hijacker computer hard drives."
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Kate Shatzkin and Josh Mitchell and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | March 22, 2003
About 40 anti-war protesters were arrested yesterday morning after they blocked an entrance to the U.S. District Court building in downtown Baltimore, federal and city police officials said. As the United States escalated its bombing campaign against Iraq, protesters carrying signs and shouting anti-war slogans gathered about 9 a.m. in front of the Garmatz Federal Courthouse on West Lombard Street. Organizers of the protest said they wanted to deliver a letter to Chief Judge J. Frederick Motz requesting action against the war. But when a team of more than 60 city police and federal security officials blocked members of the group from entering the building, some protesters lay in front of an entrance to an underground parking garage, organizers said.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2001
Worried about further terrorist attacks, federal officials shut down the nation's entire air transportation system yesterday, ordering thousands of airplanes out of the skies and prohibiting takeoffs at airports nationwide. The unprecedented "ground stop" cleared the nation's skies of civilian aircraft for the first time in history, and poured thousands of stranded travelers onto an already clogged network of highways and rail lines. But passenger rail and bus services shut down as well, virtually freezing public transportation in the Northeast.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | September 23, 2000
Federal Hill's historic Southway Bowling Center is closing to be converted into upscale loft apartments. And Alva Brown, duckpin hall-of-famer in the city where the sport was born, said it's a tragedy. "Feel bad for the kids," said Brown, 78, who runs the 61-year-old southern Baltimore landmark with her son. "Where are they going to go?" Duckpin bowling is a celebrated Baltimore pastime that, according to local lore, was invented at a Howard Street tavern a century ago by Orioles John McGraw and Wilbert Robinson.
NEWS
February 5, 1998
Taxpayers may get free help with their federal and state income tax returns tomorrow at two Baltimore offices.Internal Revenue Service and Maryland comptroller's office personnel will be in the lobby of the State Office Building in the 300 block of W. Preston St. and in the lobby of the Fallon Federal Building in Hopkins Plaza.The service will be available from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the State Office Building and from 8: 30 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the federal building.More than 200 taxpayers visited the offices when the service was provided Monday, according to state Comptroller Louis L. Goldstein.
NEWS
By Newsday | June 28, 1993
NEW YORK -- The ringleader of the plot to terrorize New York City with a medley of well-orchestrated bombings had planned to flee to the Philippines, sources close to the investigation have revealed.Siddig Ibrahim Siddig Ali, a Muslim fundamentalist accused of being the ringleader of the plan to bomb the United Nations, the Federal Building and the Lincoln and Holland Tunnels, had, by the time of his arrest Thursday, already sold his furniture and home computer, a federal law enforcement source said.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,Sun Staff Correspondent | April 21, 1995
OKLAHOMA CITY -- The children's playground has become a morgue.Behind the blown-apart federal building, sealed off from the public, rescue workers have been pulling badly mangled and crushed bodies from the wreckage for two days now, laying them side by side where children from a day-care center in the building once played.The tedious, emotional search through the mountain of concrete and twisted steel was starting to take its toll on rescue workers yesterday. If it wasn't for the few success stories, they wouldn't have any hope at all."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 8, 1998
DENVER -- Terry L. Nichols escaped the death penalty yesterday, after a deeply divided federal jury said it could not decide just how active a role he played in planning the bombing that killed 168 people in Oklahoma City's federal building.Judge Richard P. Matsch excused jurors yesterday morning and will sentence Nichols to a life term or, possibly, a lesser term. Under federal law, only the jury could have given Nichols the death penalty, the sentence that was given to his co-conspirator, Timothy J. McVeigh.
BUSINESS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 25, 1997
A White Plains, N.Y., utility company is expanding its Baltimore presence by setting up a division here to pursue federal projects.Trigen Energy Corp. formed the division, Trigen Energy Federal Projects, after it was awarded a $150 million Department of Defense contract, according to Jim J. Abromitis, president of Trigen Energy Baltimore and the new division.Trigen has four facilities in the Baltimore area that produce heat, steam and cooling. The company competes with Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.Abromitis said the company's growth has been helped by a new federal policy that allows the company to go directly to those in charge of federal facilities who can award contracts to their company without going through a lengthy process of bidding.
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