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By Paul West, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2010
Two Baltimore-area nominees to the federal bench, Ellen Lipton Hollander and James K. Bredar, moved a step closer to confirmation Thursday when the Judiciary committee voted to send their names to the full Senate. The Marylanders won approval on voice votes, without opposition, but could still face a considerable wait to begin their lifetime appointments. At least 23 other judicial nominees are already in line for Senate debate and final action, as Republicans continue to slow the confirmation process.
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NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | July 20, 2014
On February 19, 2008, Sen. Barack Obama promised to "fundamentally transform America. " This was no mere rhetoric from the telegenic man who would go on to best Hillary Clinton for the Democratic nomination. Rather, it was an audacious (to borrow a term) pledge to transform America's economy, culture and standing in the world. Some on the right responded with unfounded allegations against candidate Obama, claiming he was a socialist, closet Muslim or racist. All were off base, but lodged often enough to allow the mainstream press to paint anti-Obama-ites with a broad brush - often laced with its own hint of racist innuendo (This defense mechanism continues to act as sword and shield for the president and Democratic leaders in Congress.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2013
The top deputy in the Baltimore prosecutor's office is in line to become a Maryland federal judge after President Obama formally nominated for the job Wednesday. The nominee, George J. Hazel, 38, was hired to join Gregg L. Bernstein's team shortly after his election as State's Attorney in 2010. Hazel oversees felony cases including those handled by the office's major investigations, homicide and special victims units. Hazel was a U.S. prosecutor in Washington and Baltimore before joining the city office in 2011.
NEWS
November 20, 2013
Given the money that you want readers to pay for digital access, perhaps you can hire an intern to do just a bit of research before you print typically slanted editorials like the recent one on President Obama's appointments to the federal bench ( "Senate obstructionists run wild," Nov. 19). To say that "obstruction has gotten out of hand, and the Democrats' failure to do anything about it makes them look weak" - especially in regard to filling seats in the D.C. Court of Appeals - is perfectly laughable.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | May 29, 1993
Two judges and a state's attorney -- all from the Washington suburbs -- have been recommended to fill vacancies on Maryland's federal bench.Democratic Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes of Maryland announced yesterday that he has asked the White House to nominate U.S. Magistrate Judge Deborah K. Chasanow, Prince George's County State's Attorney Alexander Williams Jr. and Montgomery County Circuit Judge Peter J. Messitte."
NEWS
By Cynthia Tucker | May 2, 2005
ATLANTA - Janice Rogers Brown's life story is testimony to the triumph of intellect and will, the indomitability of the human spirit and the singular promise of America. Born to sharecroppers in Greenville, Ala., in 1949, Ms. Brown, who is black, spent her childhood under the brutal lash of Jim Crow. Against the odds, she has risen to occupy a seat on the California Supreme Court. Still, she does not belong on the federal bench. Justice Brown is one of a handful of extremist judicial nominees put forward by President Bush but blocked, so far, by the U.S. Senate.
NEWS
By Nelson Schwartz and Nelson Schwartz,Contributing Writer | August 18, 1994
WASHINGTON -- After enduring months of questioning about his qualifications, Prince George's County prosecutor Alexander Williams Jr. was confirmed by the full Senate last night for a seat on Maryland's federal bench.Earlier this year, the American Bar Association said Mr. Williams was not qualified to serve as a federal judge, citing his lack of trial experience and poor legal writing. But members of the Senate Judiciary Committee voted unanimously last week to approve Mr. Williams' nomination and criticized the ABA's rating process.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2003
Baltimore attorney Richard D. Bennett, a white-collar criminal defense lawyer who has served as Maryland's chief federal prosecutor and was the state's Republican chairman during President Bush's 2000 campaign, was tapped yesterday by the White House to become a federal judge. Bennett, 55, was nominated to fill the vacancy on Maryland's federal bench created by Chief U.S. District Judge Frederic N. Smalkin's decision last summer to retire to senior status because of health concerns. The nomination marks the second federal judicial appointment in Maryland under the Bush administration.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Laura Vozzella and Lisa Respers and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2000
Judge Joseph C. Howard Sr., the first African-American appointed to the federal bench in Baltimore, died yesterday of a rare neurodegenerative disease at his home in Pikesville. He was 77. Known as a trailblazer in the legal and civil rights community, Judge Howard made history Oct. 23, 1979, when he was appointed judge in the U.S. District Court after being nominated by President Jimmy Carter. News of his death yesterday from Shy-Drager syndrome was met with shock and grief by those who knew the outspoken jurist.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 7, 2002
WASHINGTON - Neither the White House nor Senate Democrats are giving any quarter in their battle over what kind of judges should sit on the federal bench, and officials on both sides say they expect more confirmation fights in the months ahead. The first confrontation could be over any of several conservative nominees. One possibility, both sides say, is President Bush's declared choice of Priscilla Owen, a conservative justice on the Texas Supreme Court, for a federal appeals court post.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2013
The top deputy in the Baltimore prosecutor's office is in line to become a Maryland federal judge after President Obama formally nominated for the job Wednesday. The nominee, George J. Hazel, 38, was hired to join Gregg L. Bernstein's team shortly after his election as State's Attorney in 2010. Hazel oversees felony cases including those handled by the office's major investigations, homicide and special victims units. Hazel was a U.S. prosecutor in Washington and Baltimore before joining the city office in 2011.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2010
U.S. District Judge Alexander Williams Jr. is scheduled to speak Sunday morning at Asbury United Methodist Church in Annapolis. Judge Williams, who presides over cases in the federal court in Greenbelt, has been on the federal bench since 1994. "There is a need for our youth to see role models like Judge Williams," said Carl O. Snowden, director of the Office for Civil Rights for the Office of the Maryland Attorney General. Snowden said Williams will speak as part of the service, which is open to the public, at 11 a.m. Among his degrees, Williams received his undergraduate and law degrees from Howard University, as well a master's degree from the School of Divinity there.
NEWS
August 9, 2010
In response to the letter to the editor from Benedict Frederick Jr. regarding Chief U.S. District Judge Vaughn Walker ("Slanted coverage of gay marriage ruling," Readers Respond, Aug. 8), Mr. Frederick concludes that because Judge Walker is rumored to be gay, he would have a personal bias in his ruling. If that were the case, wouldn't the opposite be true - a straight judge would also be biased? Mr. Frederick might be interested to know that Judge Walker was nominated to the federal bench in 1987 by President Ronald Reagan, and he was confirmed under President George H. W. Bush.
NEWS
By Paul West, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2010
Two Baltimore-area nominees to the federal bench, Ellen Lipton Hollander and James K. Bredar, moved a step closer to confirmation Thursday when the Judiciary committee voted to send their names to the full Senate. The Marylanders won approval on voice votes, without opposition, but could still face a considerable wait to begin their lifetime appointments. At least 23 other judicial nominees are already in line for Senate debate and final action, as Republicans continue to slow the confirmation process.
NEWS
By Paul West, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2010
Lost in the gathering debate over President Barack Obama's next Supreme Court pick, a profound shift in the federal judiciary is taking place below the high court. Working methodically, and drawing sporadic fire from left and right, Obama is gradually reshaping the U.S. courts. Already, he's tipped the balance of two appellate circuits to Democratic-appointed majorities, with a third about to flip. He also is choosing a larger proportion of women and minorities for lifetime federal judgeships than other presidents.
NEWS
By Carl Tobias | January 18, 2008
Next week, when federal judicial selection resumes, participants in the process could learn much from efforts to fill Judge J. Michael Luttig's vacancy on the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. On May 10, 2006, Judge Luttig, one of the brightest stars in the conservative judicial firmament and who was on every Supreme Court short list, resigned from the 4th Circuit, which includes Maryland. Nineteen months later, President Bush has yet to nominate anyone for this vacancy - a failure to act that typifies the Bush administration's selection process.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2002
The White House nominated Baltimore Circuit Judge William D. Quarles yesterday to become the first federal judge for Maryland appointed under President Bush. Quarles, 54, has spent the past six years as a Circuit Court judge in Baltimore. He previously was a partner at the law firm Venable, Baetjer and Howard and was an assistant U.S. attorney during the Reagan administration. His nomination to the federal bench in Baltimore was expected. It was announced yesterday by U.S. Rep. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., a Baltimore County Republican who lobbied for the appointment.
NEWS
September 29, 1996
District Judge James Battin,71, a former Republican congressman who spent 27 years on the federal bench, died Friday of cancer in Billings, Mont.Pub Date: 9/29/96
NEWS
By Cynthia Tucker | May 2, 2005
ATLANTA - Janice Rogers Brown's life story is testimony to the triumph of intellect and will, the indomitability of the human spirit and the singular promise of America. Born to sharecroppers in Greenville, Ala., in 1949, Ms. Brown, who is black, spent her childhood under the brutal lash of Jim Crow. Against the odds, she has risen to occupy a seat on the California Supreme Court. Still, she does not belong on the federal bench. Justice Brown is one of a handful of extremist judicial nominees put forward by President Bush but blocked, so far, by the U.S. Senate.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 14, 2003
WASHINGTON - President Bush unleashed harsh criticism at Senate Democrats yesterday for holding up his judicial nominees as the last hours ticked down on a theatrical 39-hour marathon debate on judges that seemed to leave the two parties as deeply divided as ever. Little has changed since Republicans marched to the Senate chamber Wednesday evening to protest Democrats' use of procedural tactics this year to prevent a handful of Bush's conservative judicial choices from getting confirmation votes.
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