Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFederal Aviation Administration
IN THE NEWS

Federal Aviation Administration

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2013
Five air traffic control towers in Maryland that are part of 149 "low activity" towers nationwide will remain open through the end of the September, the U.S. Department of Transportation announced Friday. The towers, including those at Martin State Airport in Baltimore County and Easton/Newnam Field on the Eastern Shore had been slated to close in June under federal budget cuts known as sequestration. Legislation approved by Congress last month gave the Federal Aviation Administration authority to transfer money from other accounts to keep the towers open.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2013
Five air traffic control towers in Maryland that are part of 149 "low activity" towers nationwide will remain open through the end of the September, the U.S. Department of Transportation announced Friday. The towers, including those at Martin State Airport in Baltimore County and Easton/Newnam Field on the Eastern Shore had been slated to close in June under federal budget cuts known as sequestration. Legislation approved by Congress last month gave the Federal Aviation Administration authority to transfer money from other accounts to keep the towers open.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Joe Davidson, The Washington Post | January 3, 2013
Congressional action to avert a "fiscal cliff" of higher taxes and across-the-board federal budget cuts means that government agencies will avoid many dreaded spending reductions — at least for now. But "now" is no more than two months. The future remains uncertain for federal employees because the legislation, passed less than 24 hours into 2013, delays the budget reductions known as sequestration only until early March. "Really, do we have to go through that again?" asked an exasperated Gregory J. Junemann, president of the International Federation of Professional & Technical Engineers.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2013
While hundreds of thousands of federal workers brace for unpaid furloughs starting next month, Uncle Sam is still looking to hire. In one week alone this month, nearly 2,200 job listings available to the public were posted on USAJobs.gov, the federal government's recruiting site. Add in new postings open only to current or former federal workers , including those laid off, and the number of new openings jumps to more than 4,600. "One thing for sure about hiring freezes: They always begin to melt as soon as they are put into place," said Don Kettl, dean of the University of Maryland School of Public Policy at College Park.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2013
While hundreds of thousands of federal workers brace for unpaid furloughs starting next month, Uncle Sam is still looking to hire. In one week alone this month, nearly 2,200 job listings available to the public were posted on USAJobs.gov, the federal government's recruiting site. Add in new postings open only to current or former federal workers , including those laid off, and the number of new openings jumps to more than 4,600. "One thing for sure about hiring freezes: They always begin to melt as soon as they are put into place," said Don Kettl, dean of the University of Maryland School of Public Policy at College Park.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 28, 1995
MANILA, Philippines -- They called the project Bojinka, "the explosion."The plan was devastating in its complexity and technical brilliance. If it had not been foiled, it might have been the worst terrorist attack in U.S. history.Project Bojinka was a plan to blow up 11 U.S. airliners over the Pacific in a day of rage at the United States.According to investigators, it called for five Muslim terrorists to plant virtually undetectable bombs aboard the planes, all jumbo jets, in an intricately synchronized plan that had the bombers changing planes as many as four times in a day.The U.S. government has accused Ramzi Ahmed Yousef, the Pakistani suspected of engineering the New York World Trade Center bombing, of being the mastermind behind the Bojinka plot.
NEWS
By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | January 13, 1992
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- "Palm 90" probably wouldn't be remembered as one of the most horrifying air disasters if a handful of heroes had not saved a few survivors from the icy Potomac River.But this was real-life drama, a story of tragedy and triumph, captured on camera in the nation's capital.In turn, "Palm 90," the air traffic control code name for Air Florida's Flight 90, is still a vivid memory 10 years later for many across the country. It crashed Jan. 13, 1982, killing 78, including four on the ground.
NEWS
December 4, 2002
John L. McLucas, 82, former secretary of the Air Force and head of the Federal Aviation Administration during the 1970s, died Sunday in Alexandria, Va. He served during the Nixon and Ford administrations as Air Force secretary from 1973 to 1975 and then as FAA administrator until 1977. Most recently, he was board chairman of the Arthur C. Clarke Foundation.
NEWS
May 8, 2002
Howard County state legislators are sponsoring a meeting today with Federal Aviation Administration officials to discuss changes in landing patterns at Baltimore-Washington International Airport and what effect the changes might have on noise in Howard County. The meeting, which is open to the public, will be held at 7:30 p.m. in the Ellicott Room, George Howard Building, 3430 Court House Drive, Ellicott City.
NEWS
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | October 28, 1997
Federal Aviation Administration officials have ordered the operators of some of the most heavily used Boeing 737 jetliners to quickly repair potentially dangerous cracks in fuselages after the discovery of severe cracking on three Southwest Airlines jets.The cracks, found at joints where aluminum skin panels overlap, are the result of stresses encountered over thousands of flights in which the airplane is pressurized and depressurized.Pub Date: 10/28/97
NEWS
By Joe Davidson, The Washington Post | January 3, 2013
Congressional action to avert a "fiscal cliff" of higher taxes and across-the-board federal budget cuts means that government agencies will avoid many dreaded spending reductions — at least for now. But "now" is no more than two months. The future remains uncertain for federal employees because the legislation, passed less than 24 hours into 2013, delays the budget reductions known as sequestration only until early March. "Really, do we have to go through that again?" asked an exasperated Gregory J. Junemann, president of the International Federation of Professional & Technical Engineers.
NEWS
August 28, 2014
Police departments in Maryland and across the country are weighing the costs and benefits of using unmanned aerial vehicles as aids in the fight against crime. There are still many unanswered questions regarding the new technology's potential impact on citizens' privacy rights as well as safety concerns related to their sharing airspace with civilian and military aircraft. Those issues will all require careful study before drones can be deployed as a widely available law-enforcement tool.
BUSINESS
By States News Service | April 29, 1991
Federal Contracts Report is a weekly summary of selected contracts recently awarded by the federal government to companies and other vendors in the Baltimore area.* American Construction Services Inc. of Edgewood won an $802,000 contract from the Federal Aviation Administration Technical Center to supply underground and vaulted tanks.* Eagen McAllister Associates Inc. of Lexington Park won a $548,889 contract from the Navy to provide architectural and engineering services.* Westinghouse Electric Corp.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.