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By Peter S. Green and Peter S. Green,Special to The Sun | July 5, 1991
LJUBLJANA, Yugoslavia -- The platoon of Slovenian police reservists at the Ljubelj border crossing looked like a nervous lot as their commandant raised the white, red and blue Slovenian flag above the customs house June 26.A half-mile down the winding mountain road, at the Marshal Tito army post, a detachment of federal Yugoslav People's Army troops waited with tanks and armored cars.The Slovenians, well-equipped with bulletproof vests and blue-gray uniforms, had only high-powered rifles, Kalashnikov submachine guns and a few shoulder-fired anti-tank missiles.
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NEWS
By Katie Cosgrove and Katie Cosgrove,SUN STAFF | May 9, 2004
The battle of New Market, Va., on May 15, 1864, was a fairly small fight by Civil War standards, but the Confederate victory in the Shenandoah Valley had a significant place in the larger mosaic of the war in Northern Virginia in the spring of 1864. Here is a chronology of 1864 events in Northern Virginia leading up the fighting at New Market: Feb. 1: The House of Representative passed a bill authorizing the rank of lieutenant general. In the federal service, this rank had only been held previously by George Washington, as commander of the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War, and temporarily by Winfield Scott, who, at 74, was commander-in-chief of the federal army at the outbreak of the Civil War and had been a general since the War of 1812.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 9, 1992
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- Only hours after the deadliest violation of a 2-month-old cease-fire, an Indian general and three dozen administrators arrived in Yugoslavia yesterday to launch Europe's first U.N. peacekeeping mission.Lt. Gen. Satish Nambiar told journalists at Belgrade airport that he and other senior officers for the 14,000-troop deployment would not be deterred by the latest outbreak of violence.The U.N. mission, delayed for months by disputes among the Yugoslav combatants and by concerns about its $634 million annual cost, got under way as the federal army and Serb guerrillas resumed heavy artillery attacks on the eastern Croatian city of Osijek.
NEWS
July 29, 2001
The news from Washington last evening by train relates merely to the movements of the Federal army. We gather the following from the Star of yesterday afternoon: The forward movement -- rumors of an engagement. The Star, in noticing the movement of Gen. McDowell's column towards Fairfax Court House, en route for Manassas Junction, says: The column on the extreme right is commanded by General Hunter; the right centre column by General Tyler. That consists of the following troops: The Maine Second and the First, Second and Third Connecticut regiments, under Col. Keyes; the New York Second and First and Second Ohio regiments, under Brigadier General Schenck, and the New York Thirteenth, Sixty-ninth, Seventy-ninth and First Wisconsin under Col. Corcoran (probably)
NEWS
By Alan Cowell and Alan Cowell,New York Times News Service | September 22, 1991
ZAGREB, Yugoslavia -- Federal army tanks battered Croatia's easternmost garrisons with shellfire, and warplanes struck its Adriatic coastline yesterday as the army launched the civil war's broadest and harshest assault against the secessionist republic.Croatian officials appealed to Yugoslav military leaders in Belgrade twice for a truce in a conflict that is threatening to escalate beyond control, but there was no public response, suggesting that the federal authorities are bent on expanding territorial control in a weakened Croatia.
NEWS
June 29, 1991
In respite, Yugoslavia's cooler heads (if any) have a chance to prevail. Now that the federal army has proclaimed victory and a cease-fire in its two-day war with secessionist Slovenia, the federal presidency can seek compromise.But Yugoslavia's European neighbors should not leave that to chance and Yugoslav passions. They are right to pursue the opportunity for good works provided by the recently strengthened Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE).Austria and Italy invoked use of the Conflict Prevention Center in Vienna, set up by the CSCE summit last November.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 7, 1991
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- Despite a threatened European trade embargo, Yugoslavia's warfare intensified yesterday after Croatia ordered full mobilization against the advancing federal army and a top Serbian general accused the republic of "asking for total war."Serbian guerrillas backed by federal army troops, tanks and aircraft fired shells within 10 miles of Zagreb as they closed in on the Croatian capital.The Serbian forces also pressed their attack on the strategic city of Karlovac and reached the center of Vukovar, in eastern Croatia, one of the last Croatian strongholds in a region that has been pounded by artillery for weeks.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 20, 1991
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- The federal army broke a troubling three-day silence yesterday, easing fears of an imminent military coup by promising not to interfere in Yugoslavia's political crisis.But the armed forces warned that they would "under no circumstances permit interethnic armed conflicts and civil war" and also signaled their readiness to halt unrest such as the anti-Communist protests that paralyzed Belgrade last week.The statement from hard-line Communists of the high command took no notice of Serbia's deliberate destruction of the collective federal presidency, which has deprived Yugoslavia of leadership and the armed forces of a commander in chief.
NEWS
By Charles T. Powers and Charles T. Powers,Los Angeles Times | September 24, 1991
VARAZDIN, Yugoslavia -- While a cease-fire generally held across Croatia yesterday, the forces of the embattled breakaway republic were busy distributing a haul of tanks, armored personnel carriers and stocks of weapons abandoned over the weekend by federal army troops.The federal troops departed hastily Sunday, forced by the terms of their withdrawal to change into civilian clothes on the lawn of their barracks, leaving their pants and boots soaking in a steady rain, before boarding buses for home.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 18, 1991
ZAGREB, Yugoslavia -- This city, capital of the secessionist Croatian republic, was under fierce attack by the Yugoslav army and air force yesterday, hours after federal military leaders signed another cease-fire brokered by the European Community.Yugoslav air force planes could be heard streaking through the darkness, strafing the blacked-out city below, and the ground shook with the explosions of artillery shells fired into the city center from Yugoslav army bases on the outskirts.Helicopters, presumably carrying federal troops, were seen flying over the city in what appeared to be a drive to knock out the local television transmitter.
NEWS
By Jack Gorman and Jack Gorman,Special to the Sun | October 15, 2000
The morning of Oct. 19, 1864, had gone badly for the Union army at Cedar Creek, but about 10:30 a.m., after he heard sounds of battle and pushed his horse on a much-publicized hard ride from Winchester, Va., Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan arrived to rally his troops. At the time of Sheridan's arrival, only the 6th Corps and the adjacent cavalry had formed a line of battle to put up a fight, and after several attacks, the Confederates had halted in order to regroup for a seemingly easy victory.
NEWS
By ANDREW D. FAITH and ANDREW D. FAITH,SUN STAFF | June 7, 1998
As thousands of Civil War re-enactors meet in Gettysburg, Pa., next month to commemorate a crucial battle of that war, the outcome of that struggle is well known to history: The Confederate army was defeated with such devastating losses that it was never again capable of winning the war. But in June 1863, as the two armies started toward the battlefield, there was no such certainty about the verdict.After Gen. Robert E. Lee, commander of the Army of Northern Virginia, had defeated the Union army at Chancellorsville, Va., May 2-4, 1863, Southerners' hopes soared to the possibility that Lee's army would march north to New York or Philadelphia and dictate the terms of peace and Southern independence at the Capitol in Washington.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 9, 1992
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- Only hours after the deadliest violation of a 2-month-old cease-fire, an Indian general and three dozen administrators arrived in Yugoslavia yesterday to launch Europe's first U.N. peacekeeping mission.Lt. Gen. Satish Nambiar told journalists at Belgrade airport that he and other senior officers for the 14,000-troop deployment would not be deterred by the latest outbreak of violence.The U.N. mission, delayed for months by disputes among the Yugoslav combatants and by concerns about its $634 million annual cost, got under way as the federal army and Serb guerrillas resumed heavy artillery attacks on the eastern Croatian city of Osijek.
FEATURES
October 27, 1991
December 1860. It was a fateful month for Marylanders and al U.S. citizens as South Carolina seceded from the Union and other Southern states soon joined it. In a few short months, Confederate troops would begin shelling federal property, specifically Fort Sumter in Charleston harbor.How ready were the federal troops -- in Maryland and elsewher-- for the start of the Civil War? And who were some of the high-ranking military men with Maryland connections?The only immediate force that the government had at its command to stem the tide of war was its regular Army -- a scattered force of 16,000 men. They were expected to provide security in a country of more than 30 million people on 4 million square miles of land.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Special to The Sun | October 20, 1991
ILOK, Yugoslavia -- A convoy of French doctors accompanied by European Community monitors managed yesterday to enter Vukovar, the town Croatians are calling their Stalingrad.But it was a small -- and imperfect -- victory in a spreading war.Although Croatian forces and the Serb-led federal army had agreed to a two-day truce to give the convoy safe passage, it came under fire as it was leaving the besieged town.One vehicle reportedly struck a mine, and two French nurses were hurt.About 60 of the most seriously injured patients had been loaded into ambulances, but dozens more remained in a Vukovar field hospital.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 7, 1991
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- Despite a threatened European trade embargo, Yugoslavia's warfare intensified yesterday after Croatia ordered full mobilization against the advancing federal army and a top Serbian general accused the republic of "asking for total war."Serbian guerrillas backed by federal army troops, tanks and aircraft fired shells within 10 miles of Zagreb as they closed in on the Croatian capital.The Serbian forces also pressed their attack on the strategic city of Karlovac and reached the center of Vukovar, in eastern Croatia, one of the last Croatian strongholds in a region that has been pounded by artillery for weeks.
FEATURES
October 27, 1991
December 1860. It was a fateful month for Marylanders and al U.S. citizens as South Carolina seceded from the Union and other Southern states soon joined it. In a few short months, Confederate troops would begin shelling federal property, specifically Fort Sumter in Charleston harbor.How ready were the federal troops -- in Maryland and elsewher-- for the start of the Civil War? And who were some of the high-ranking military men with Maryland connections?The only immediate force that the government had at its command to stem the tide of war was its regular Army -- a scattered force of 16,000 men. They were expected to provide security in a country of more than 30 million people on 4 million square miles of land.
NEWS
By Jack Gorman and Jack Gorman,Special to the Sun | October 15, 2000
The morning of Oct. 19, 1864, had gone badly for the Union army at Cedar Creek, but about 10:30 a.m., after he heard sounds of battle and pushed his horse on a much-publicized hard ride from Winchester, Va., Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan arrived to rally his troops. At the time of Sheridan's arrival, only the 6th Corps and the adjacent cavalry had formed a line of battle to put up a fight, and after several attacks, the Confederates had halted in order to regroup for a seemingly easy victory.
NEWS
By Charles T. Powers and Charles T. Powers,Los Angeles Times | September 24, 1991
VARAZDIN, Yugoslavia -- While a cease-fire generally held across Croatia yesterday, the forces of the embattled breakaway republic were busy distributing a haul of tanks, armored personnel carriers and stocks of weapons abandoned over the weekend by federal army troops.The federal troops departed hastily Sunday, forced by the terms of their withdrawal to change into civilian clothes on the lawn of their barracks, leaving their pants and boots soaking in a steady rain, before boarding buses for home.
NEWS
By Alan Cowell and Alan Cowell,New York Times News Service | September 22, 1991
ZAGREB, Yugoslavia -- Federal army tanks battered Croatia's easternmost garrisons with shellfire, and warplanes struck its Adriatic coastline yesterday as the army launched the civil war's broadest and harshest assault against the secessionist republic.Croatian officials appealed to Yugoslav military leaders in Belgrade twice for a truce in a conflict that is threatening to escalate beyond control, but there was no public response, suggesting that the federal authorities are bent on expanding territorial control in a weakened Croatia.
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