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By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2012
Targeting human trafficking, federal agents participated in a joint operation with local law enforcement that led to the arrest of 23 men alleged to have solicited sex from undercover officers along U.S. 1 in Jessup. The sting brought agents from Homeland Security Investigations, a division of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, together with officers from local and state police departments. While local law enforcement goes after so-called johns to deter prostitution, their value to federal authorities is as a source of information for cases against human traffickers.
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | August 20, 2012
In 1995, Barack Obama released "Dreams From My Father," a compelling memoir full of stories about his life that -- though often not exactly true -- persuaded many people that this young man had a great political future ahead of him. Nearly a decade later, Mr. Obama introduced himself to the country with a stirring speech at the 2004 Democratic convention in which he conceded, "I stand here knowing that my story is part of the larger American story...
NEWS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
Last month's raid on the Patapsco Flea Market in Southwest Baltimore netted $47.3 million worth of counterfeit luxury goods, the largest seizure at a flea market in the United States, federal authorities announced Thursday. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's Homeland Security Investigations also confiscated $1.5 million in cash, which it described as "suspected criminal proceeds. " Federal officials released new details of the April 22 raid on the bazaar, where authorities say vendors sold counterfeit and pirated goods with the market owner's knowledge.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2012
Imean Shaheed was working last Sunday when federal agents rushed into the Patapsco Flea Market, announced over the loudspeaker that the bazaar was closed for business and shut down vendors selling knockoff Nikes, Louis Vuitton bags and Tiffany & Co. jewelry. "It was like the movies," the 20-year-old Shaheed said Saturday after the Cherry Hill flea market re-opened. Some booths were empty, but the parking lot was full and customers flocked to vendors such as Shaheed who were open for business.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2012
Undercover federal agents rented a booth at Patapsco Flea Market to gain access to its management as part of a 2 1/2 -year sting targeting merchants selling counterfeit and pirated goods - an investigation that resulted in a raid Sunday on the Southwest Baltimore marketplace, according to a search warrant and affidavit released Monday. Capping the intensive investigation into fake brand-name clothes and accessories, as well as pirated DVDs and musical recordings, special agents with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Homeland Security Investigations confiscated numerous items being sold at the sprawling market.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2012
Vendors at the Patapsco Flea Market have a history of allegedly selling counterfeit and pirated merchandise, according to an affidavit, which outlined the latest accusation that resulted in a raid Sunday by federal Homeland Security Investigations special agents. Capping a 2 1/2-year-long investigation into counterfeit apparel and accessories as well as pirated DVDs and musical recordings, federal investigators confiscated numerous items being sold there. Federal authorities released few details about the raid, but the affidavit details several undercover operations that found that many of the items sold at the flea market were fake.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2012
Antonio Martinez renounced terrorism and expressed regret Friday for trying to blow up a Catonsville military center, shortly before he was sentenced to 25 years in prison - closing a case that brought a radical holy war to Maryland. Prosecutors suggested Martinez's turnaround was insincere. Materials indicating his continuing connection to terrorist beliefs were seized recently from the 22-year-old's cell, said Assistant U.S. Attorney Christine Manuelian. He appears to still have a "mindset" of wanting to kill in the name of religion, more than a year after the failed attack, Manuelian said at the sentencing hearing.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2012
A Baltimore-area man will face up to 25 years in prison after pleading guilty Thursday to the attempted use of a weapon of mass destruction in connection with a failed terrorist plot to blow up a Catonsville military recruiting center in December 2010. Antonio Benjamin Martinez, 22, who also goes by the name Muhammad Hussain, had also been charged with attempting to murder federal officials, but he pleaded not guilty to that count in a deal with federal prosecutors. His sentencing is set for April 6 in Maryland U.S. District Court.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | August 14, 2011
On its face, this strikes me as a pretty good idea: Allow police or federal agents to use the "ping" signal or GPS in a suspect's cell phone to track him down and execute a warrant for his arrest. This seems like a reasonable and even wise use of "location technology. " It would likely save time and money, and give cops and marshals another tool in their efforts to bring the accused to the bar presto, pronto, post-haste. But not so fast. Magistrate Judge Susan K. Gauvey, of the U.S. District Court in Baltimore, just issued an exhaustive, 139-page opinion on this matter, saying it is no small matter - and raising the large matter of the Fourth Amendment.
NEWS
By Rebekah Brown | July 27, 2011
From the street the faded, yellow house on Belair Road looks unassuming. Three large picture windows overlook a community recreation center and an elementary school. It's around the corner from a community baseball diamond. On one recent visit, a small American flag lay discarded on the front lawn, along with a few scattered cigarette butts. A metal pipe protrudes above a side door. Before the police raided this house, prosecutors said the pipe held a surveillance camera placed there by the operators that recorded the number of men who passed through the entrance, and helped monitor the women working inside.
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