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By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2012
Antonio Martinez renounced terrorism and expressed regret Friday for trying to blow up a Catonsville military center, shortly before he was sentenced to 25 years in prison - closing a case that brought a radical holy war to Maryland. Prosecutors suggested Martinez's turnaround was insincere. Materials indicating his continuing connection to terrorist beliefs were seized recently from the 22-year-old's cell, said Assistant U.S. Attorney Christine Manuelian. He appears to still have a "mindset" of wanting to kill in the name of religion, more than a year after the failed attack, Manuelian said at the sentencing hearing.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 7, 1996
JORDAN, Mont. -- In the first defections from the Freemen fugitives in two months, a couple, along with the woman's two children, voluntarily left the group's High Plains farmhouse yesterday and were whisked away by federal agents.The break follows the government's increasing pressure tactics, which began Monday with the shut-off of electricity to the compound, where 18 people, including the two children who left yesterday and a 16-year-old boy, had been holed up since March 25.The four who left the compound were identified as Elwyn Ward, 55, Gloria Ward, 35 (also known as Tamara Mangum)
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 1, 2010
A federal grand jury in Maryland has charged the chairman of the Senate's powerful budget panel and two former supermarket executives with bribery, extortion and other criminal offenses in an 18-count indictment. In announcing the charges Wednesday, prosecutors said Sen. Ulysses Currie, a Democrat, had misused his influence for personal gain while helping Shoppers Food Warehouse expand in Maryland. "Government officials cross a bright line when they accept payments in return for using the authority of their office, whether they take cash in envelopes or checks labeled as consulting payments," U.S. Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein said in a statement.
NEWS
By Robert Reinhold and Robert Reinhold,New York Times News Service | March 14, 1993
WACO, Texas -- Nearly two weeks after federal agents began a siege on an armed religious sect, federal officials said yesterday that conditions were deteriorating inside the compound, with a number of the 105 remaining sect members suffering life-threatening injuries from the shootout. But there was no sign of any speedy break in the standoff.Doctors gave medical advice to the wounded by telephone Friday night and urged them to seek hospitalization; none accepted. One of the most seriously wounded is Judy Schneider, 41, the wife of Steve Schneider, the top lieutenant to the Branch Davidian sect's leader, David Koresh.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Staff Writer | August 20, 1993
A Baltimore man jailed on drug charges in 1991 continued to deal in drugs both locally and from behind the walls of one of America's toughest federal prisons, federal law enforcement sources said yesterday.The inmate, Michael Barnes, 39, had his wife and others smuggle heroin to him inside the U.S. Penitentiary at Terre Haute, Ind., where it was distributed to inmates, the sources said.Yesterday, Barnes and his wife, Cheryl Denise Barnes, 37, were charged in sealed indictments brought by the U.S. attorney's office in the Southern District of Indiana.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Scott Higham and Caitlin Francke and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1999
Christopher Wills, the man freed by a Baltimore judge because his trial on carjacking and armed robbery charges languished too long, denounced his rearrest on federal charges stemming from the same crime yesterday, calling it a "vengeful prosecution."In a telephone interview from the city jail, Wills said he was cleared of the state charges three months ago because prosecutors and judges violated his right to a "speedy trial" within Maryland's 180-day deadline."When I [win] because you violated my rights, don't try to persecute me unfairly," Wills said.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2011
Antonio Martinez, who is accused of masterminding a failed jihadist plot to bomb a Catonsville military center, pleaded not guilty Friday to a two-count indictment charging him with the attempted murder of federal employees and the attempted use of a "weapon of mass destruction. " The 21-year-old Baltimore man, who has been in custody since his arrest a month ago, could receive life in prison if convicted on both counts, as well as a fine of up to $500,000. Martinez, who prefers to be known as Muhammad Hussain, confessed to plotting the attack after it was foiled Dec. 8 by investigators posing as accomplices, prosecutor Christine Manuelian said in court last month.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2011
A 39-year-old man was sentenced to 22 years in prison on Monday for selling cocaine in West Baltimore after agents with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration intercepted drugs and a package containing more than $250,000 in cash. A jury convicted Gregory Alfred Whyte, also known as "Manny," after a six-day trial in U.S. District Court in Baltimore. Prosecutors said he was given a harsher sentence because he tried to intimidate a witness into recanting his testimony. The case began when federal agents in Los Angeles intercepted a refrigerator that was being sent to an address on North Fulton Avenue in Baltimore.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | May 14, 2013
Last month, I received emails from two people I know but who don't know each other: one a close friend and Second Amendment supporter, and the other a regular reader who sends me news items she believes the "liberal media" are willfully suppressing. Each sent me a story link about recent U.S. Department of Homeland Security purchases of huge stockpiles of ammunition, including hollow-point bullets. A Forbes.com column penned by Larry Bell, replete with conspiratorial overtones, suggested that the Obama administration is up-arming itself while trying to disarm the citizenry.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | March 26, 1996
Federal agents didn't have to go far to round up another group of illegal immigrants yesterday: They found them working in the federal building in downtown Baltimore.The agents arrested a dozen immigrants removing asbestos from the Fallon Federal Building at Hopkins Plaza. All were certified by the state to remove asbestos, and all were carrying federal photo identification cards, giving them access to what is supposed to be a secure building."To find illegal immigrants working in a federal building is a bit of an irony," said Benedict J. Ferro, director of the Immigration and Naturalization Service in Maryland.
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