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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 10, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The siege goes on. The bills roll in.Guns and ammo? No problem, they bring their own. It's the klieg ZTC lights and dog food that start to add up.Not to mention the $109,000 the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms shelled out for "aircraft and supplies."Even the federal bean counters have a role to play in the standoff in Waco, Texas.As the stalemate between the Branch Davidian cult and federal agents dragged past the midpoint of its second week, details emerged yesterday of just how dearly David Koresh is making the U.S. government pay.More than $1 million so far. Possibly millions more.
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 24, 1995
HYDER, Ariz. -- William Marks was a prime suspect when he was hooked up to a polygraph machine and interrogated by federal agents in connection with the deadly derailment of an Amtrak train near this desert community.During hours of questioning by agents who "stared into my eyes the whole time," Mr. Marks was told that someone had implicated him in the sabotage of a trestle that sent the Sunset Limited crashing into a ravine Oct. 9, killing one person and injuring 78.He also was asked about his gun collection, night-vision rifle scope and whether he knew anyone who hated the federal government.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 10, 1994
HOUSTON -- Ten and a half months after the apocalyptic ministry of David Koresh became known around the world with a deadly gun battle between his followers and federal agents, 11 surviving members of his sect are to go on trial today to face murder charges.Although even prosecutors have suggested that there is much confusion about who actually fired the fatal shots -- and though three defendants were not present during the gun battle -- the 10 men and a woman are all accused of being part of a broad conspiracy to kill federal agents during a raid Feb. 28 by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | March 25, 2010
Federal prosecutors filed criminal charges this week against Baltimore police Detective Mark J. Lunsford, alleging he embezzled $10,000 in confidential-informant funds while assigned to a federal drug task force, lied to colleagues and stole a broken diamond watch from a target's home during a drug raid. "The charges are not unexpected, and Mr. Lunsford is extremely regretful that he finds himself in this position," defense attorney Paul M. Polansky said Wednesday. No court date has been set on the charges, which were filed Tuesday through a "criminal information" by prosecutors rather than a grand jury indictment.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | August 27, 1993
Federal agents across the country yesterday raided offices and hospitals of National Medical Enterprises, one of the nation's largest hospital companies, as part of a national investigation of health insurance fraud.Law enforcement officials familiar with the investigation said they seized documents as part of an effort to prove that the company had participated in a national conspiracy to defraud patients and insurance companies.In a statement, the company's general counsel, Scott Brown, said National Medical was cooperating with investigators in making documents available and praised law enforcement agencies for not disturbing patients at nine hospitals entered by federal agents.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | June 29, 1995
Developer Randolph R. Ayersman has built some of rural Howard County's most beautiful gabled homes, selling for as much as $725,000.But federal agents announced yesterday that they have taken away his dream-home business, saying he financed it through the sale of more than 3 tons of marijuana smuggled in from Mexico.Ayersman, 42, has pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, and the Drug Enforcement Administration has seized properties including his $400,000 Dayton home, his nearby farm valued at $450,000 and seven choice land parcels valued at more than $800,000.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 7, 1996
JORDAN, Mont. -- In the first defections from the Freemen fugitives in two months, a couple, along with the woman's two children, voluntarily left the group's High Plains farmhouse yesterday and were whisked away by federal agents.The break follows the government's increasing pressure tactics, which began Monday with the shut-off of electricity to the compound, where 18 people, including the two children who left yesterday and a 16-year-old boy, had been holed up since March 25.The four who left the compound were identified as Elwyn Ward, 55, Gloria Ward, 35 (also known as Tamara Mangum)
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Staff Writer | August 20, 1993
A Baltimore man jailed on drug charges in 1991 continued to deal in drugs both locally and from behind the walls of one of America's toughest federal prisons, federal law enforcement sources said yesterday.The inmate, Michael Barnes, 39, had his wife and others smuggle heroin to him inside the U.S. Penitentiary at Terre Haute, Ind., where it was distributed to inmates, the sources said.Yesterday, Barnes and his wife, Cheryl Denise Barnes, 37, were charged in sealed indictments brought by the U.S. attorney's office in the Southern District of Indiana.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 1, 2010
A federal grand jury in Maryland has charged the chairman of the Senate's powerful budget panel and two former supermarket executives with bribery, extortion and other criminal offenses in an 18-count indictment. In announcing the charges Wednesday, prosecutors said Sen. Ulysses Currie, a Democrat, had misused his influence for personal gain while helping Shoppers Food Warehouse expand in Maryland. "Government officials cross a bright line when they accept payments in return for using the authority of their office, whether they take cash in envelopes or checks labeled as consulting payments," U.S. Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein said in a statement.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Scott Higham and Caitlin Francke and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1999
Christopher Wills, the man freed by a Baltimore judge because his trial on carjacking and armed robbery charges languished too long, denounced his rearrest on federal charges stemming from the same crime yesterday, calling it a "vengeful prosecution."In a telephone interview from the city jail, Wills said he was cleared of the state charges three months ago because prosecutors and judges violated his right to a "speedy trial" within Maryland's 180-day deadline."When I [win] because you violated my rights, don't try to persecute me unfairly," Wills said.
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