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By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1996
An Arundel High School teacher charged last month with using the Internet to obtain child pornography has been indicted by a federal grand jury on 13 counts of illegal trafficking and importation of pornography.Bruce Edward McDade, 47, was indicted Monday on eight counts of distributing and five counts of receiving "a visual depiction of a minor engaging in sexually explicit conduct mailed, shipped and transported in interstate commerce," according to the U.S. District Court clerk's office in Greenbelt.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 10, 1994
HOUSTON -- Ten and a half months after the apocalyptic ministry of David Koresh became known around the world with a deadly gun battle between his followers and federal agents, 11 surviving members of his sect are to go on trial today to face murder charges.Although even prosecutors have suggested that there is much confusion about who actually fired the fatal shots -- and though three defendants were not present during the gun battle -- the 10 men and a woman are all accused of being part of a broad conspiracy to kill federal agents during a raid Feb. 28 by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | March 25, 2010
Federal prosecutors filed criminal charges this week against Baltimore police Detective Mark J. Lunsford, alleging he embezzled $10,000 in confidential-informant funds while assigned to a federal drug task force, lied to colleagues and stole a broken diamond watch from a target's home during a drug raid. "The charges are not unexpected, and Mr. Lunsford is extremely regretful that he finds himself in this position," defense attorney Paul M. Polansky said Wednesday. No court date has been set on the charges, which were filed Tuesday through a "criminal information" by prosecutors rather than a grand jury indictment.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2012
Antonio Martinez renounced terrorism and expressed regret Friday for trying to blow up a Catonsville military center, shortly before he was sentenced to 25 years in prison - closing a case that brought a radical holy war to Maryland. Prosecutors suggested Martinez's turnaround was insincere. Materials indicating his continuing connection to terrorist beliefs were seized recently from the 22-year-old's cell, said Assistant U.S. Attorney Christine Manuelian. He appears to still have a "mindset" of wanting to kill in the name of religion, more than a year after the failed attack, Manuelian said at the sentencing hearing.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2012
Federal agents in Baltimore helped lead an operation that this week seized and shut down nearly 700 U.S.-based websites linked to the sale of counterfeit pharmaceutical drugs as part of an international effort to upend the global online drug trade. The local operation, known as Bitter Pill, was part of an international initiative led by Interpol that spanned 100 countries and confiscated 3.7 million doses of counterfeit medications worth an estimated $10.5 million, according to federal officials.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Kelly Gilbert and Richard Irwin and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | November 29, 1990
Three Colombia nationals, suspected of being part of the Medellin drug cartel, were arrested in a sting operation last night in the heart of Fells Point by federal agents and city police.The men were arrested after arriving from New York with more than $105,000 as payment to an undercover agent for "delivering" more than $700,000 worth of purported "high-grade cocaine," a Drug Enforcement Administration spokesman said today.In fact, said Agent Douglas Biales of the DEA office in Baltimore, the "cocaine" used in the transaction was bogus.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 7, 1996
JORDAN, Mont. -- In the first defections from the Freemen fugitives in two months, a couple, along with the woman's two children, voluntarily left the group's High Plains farmhouse yesterday and were whisked away by federal agents.The break follows the government's increasing pressure tactics, which began Monday with the shut-off of electricity to the compound, where 18 people, including the two children who left yesterday and a 16-year-old boy, had been holed up since March 25.The four who left the compound were identified as Elwyn Ward, 55, Gloria Ward, 35 (also known as Tamara Mangum)
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 1, 2010
A federal grand jury in Maryland has charged the chairman of the Senate's powerful budget panel and two former supermarket executives with bribery, extortion and other criminal offenses in an 18-count indictment. In announcing the charges Wednesday, prosecutors said Sen. Ulysses Currie, a Democrat, had misused his influence for personal gain while helping Shoppers Food Warehouse expand in Maryland. "Government officials cross a bright line when they accept payments in return for using the authority of their office, whether they take cash in envelopes or checks labeled as consulting payments," U.S. Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein said in a statement.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Scott Higham and Caitlin Francke and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1999
Christopher Wills, the man freed by a Baltimore judge because his trial on carjacking and armed robbery charges languished too long, denounced his rearrest on federal charges stemming from the same crime yesterday, calling it a "vengeful prosecution."In a telephone interview from the city jail, Wills said he was cleared of the state charges three months ago because prosecutors and judges violated his right to a "speedy trial" within Maryland's 180-day deadline."When I [win] because you violated my rights, don't try to persecute me unfairly," Wills said.
NEWS
By Robert Reinhold and Robert Reinhold,New York Times News Service | March 14, 1993
WACO, Texas -- Nearly two weeks after federal agents began a siege on an armed religious sect, federal officials said yesterday that conditions were deteriorating inside the compound, with a number of the 105 remaining sect members suffering life-threatening injuries from the shootout. But there was no sign of any speedy break in the standoff.Doctors gave medical advice to the wounded by telephone Friday night and urged them to seek hospitalization; none accepted. One of the most seriously wounded is Judy Schneider, 41, the wife of Steve Schneider, the top lieutenant to the Branch Davidian sect's leader, David Koresh.
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