Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFederal Agents
IN THE NEWS

Federal Agents

NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1996
An Arundel High School teacher charged last month with using the Internet to obtain child pornography has been indicted by a federal grand jury on 13 counts of illegal trafficking and importation of pornography.Bruce Edward McDade, 47, was indicted Monday on eight counts of distributing and five counts of receiving "a visual depiction of a minor engaging in sexually explicit conduct mailed, shipped and transported in interstate commerce," according to the U.S. District Court clerk's office in Greenbelt.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | June 29, 1995
Developer Randolph R. Ayersman has built some of rural Howard County's most beautiful gabled homes, selling for as much as $725,000.But federal agents announced yesterday that they have taken away his dream-home business, saying he financed it through the sale of more than 3 tons of marijuana smuggled in from Mexico.Ayersman, 42, has pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, and the Drug Enforcement Administration has seized properties including his $400,000 Dayton home, his nearby farm valued at $450,000 and seven choice land parcels valued at more than $800,000.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1996
An Arundel High School teacher pleaded innocent yesterday in federal court to 14 counts of illegal trafficking, importation and possession of child pornography on the Internet.Bruce Edward McDade, 47, was indicted May 13 by a federal grand jury on eight counts of distributing and five counts of receiving "a visual depiction of a minor engaging in sexually explicit conduct," according to the U.S. District Court clerk's office in Greenbelt.McDade also was charged Monday with one count of possession of child pornography on the Internet.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2004
Federal authorities and local police seized more than 150 kilograms of cocaine - valued at $4 million wholesale and as much as $40 million on the street - late Wednesday in the Baltimore area and have filed federal drug importation charges against a New York man, officials said yesterday. Law enforcement officials called the narcotics seizure one of the region's largest in recent years. "This is a huge arrest, this is a lot of drugs that are not going to reach the streets of our city," Baltimore Police Commissioner Kevin P. Clark said at a news conference with federal authorities and other local law enforcement officials to announce the seizure.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 10, 1998
WASHINGTON -- With real-life police drama gaining wide popularity as television entertainment, the Supreme Court moved yesterday to consider the constitutionality of taking the news media along on police operations.The court agreed to hear "ride-along" cases from Maryland and Montana that test whether police or federal agents violate people's privacy rights when the officers allow news reporters and photographers to accompany them onto private property to document a search or an arrest.In the Maryland case, a Montgomery County couple was routed out of bed, he in undershorts, she in a nightgown, as federal marshals with guns drawn burst into their home in 1992 to look for their son, who was a fugitive.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2012
A Baltimore-area man will face up to 25 years in prison after pleading guilty Thursday to the attempted use of a weapon of mass destruction in connection with a failed terrorist plot to blow up a Catonsville military recruiting center in December 2010. Antonio Benjamin Martinez, 22, who also goes by the name Muhammad Hussain, had also been charged with attempting to murder federal officials, but he pleaded not guilty to that count in a deal with federal prosecutors. His sentencing is set for April 6 in Maryland U.S. District Court.
NEWS
By Robert Reinhold and Robert Reinhold,New York Times News Service | March 14, 1993
WACO, Texas -- Nearly two weeks after federal agents began a siege on an armed religious sect, federal officials said yesterday that conditions were deteriorating inside the compound, with a number of the 105 remaining sect members suffering life-threatening injuries from the shootout. But there was no sign of any speedy break in the standoff.Doctors gave medical advice to the wounded by telephone Friday night and urged them to seek hospitalization; none accepted. One of the most seriously wounded is Judy Schneider, 41, the wife of Steve Schneider, the top lieutenant to the Branch Davidian sect's leader, David Koresh.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | November 15, 2001
Investigations in the Sept. 11 terrorism and the anthrax attacks that followed have federal agents in Maryland stretched so thin that they say fewer federal crimes are being investigated - at least for now. Officials say many of the 200 FBI agents assigned to Maryland and Delaware have been working full time on terrorism since Sept. 11 and have been drawn off cases they usually investigate, which range from white-collar crime to child pornography. "When Sept. 11 first happened, pretty much everybody was working on terrorism.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 26, 1999
AUSTIN, Texas -- A figure in the mysterious disappearance of atheist Madalyn Murray O'Hair was ordered held without bond yesterday after being arrested the day before on federal weapons charges.David R. Waters, 52, appeared before U.S. Magistrate Stephen Capelle after federal agents raided his Austin apartment and confiscated more than 100 rounds of ammunition."Federal firearms charges are being filed against Mr. Waters based on ammunition seized at his residence," said Assistant U.S. Attorney Gerald Carruth in Austin.
NEWS
March 1, 1994
The verdicts in the murder cases against survivors of the Waco disaster are fittingly ambiguous. None of the 11 defendants was convicted of the more serious murder and conspiracy charges, but five were found guilty of something called aiding and abetting voluntary manslaughter. This acknowledges that four federal agents were killed in the first attempt to storm the Branch Davidian stronghold in Texas a year ago. But it leaves unresolved the question who was really at fault.In no way can the violent deaths of lawmen be condoned.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.