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NEWS
By Robert Reinhold and Robert Reinhold,New York Times News Service | March 14, 1993
WACO, Texas -- Nearly two weeks after federal agents began a siege on an armed religious sect, federal officials said yesterday that conditions were deteriorating inside the compound, with a number of the 105 remaining sect members suffering life-threatening injuries from the shootout. But there was no sign of any speedy break in the standoff.Doctors gave medical advice to the wounded by telephone Friday night and urged them to seek hospitalization; none accepted. One of the most seriously wounded is Judy Schneider, 41, the wife of Steve Schneider, the top lieutenant to the Branch Davidian sect's leader, David Koresh.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2011
A 39-year-old man was sentenced to 22 years in prison on Monday for selling cocaine in West Baltimore after agents with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration intercepted drugs and a package containing more than $250,000 in cash. A jury convicted Gregory Alfred Whyte, also known as "Manny," after a six-day trial in U.S. District Court in Baltimore. Prosecutors said he was given a harsher sentence because he tried to intimidate a witness into recanting his testimony. The case began when federal agents in Los Angeles intercepted a refrigerator that was being sent to an address on North Fulton Avenue in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2014
FBI agents fatally shot a man Friday afternoon in a busy commercial area of Owings Mills, the bureau and Baltimore County police confirmed. The shooting happened around 4:45 p.m. in the 9700 block of Reisterstown Road on an access road to a shopping complex housing a Wal-Mart and Sam's Club, among other businesses. No details about the circumstances surrounding the shooting were provided, and the man who died was not identified. The FBI said a shoot review team from headquarters was at the scene to conduct the investigation.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2012
Undercover federal agents rented a booth at Patapsco Flea Market to gain access to its management as part of a 2 1/2 -year sting targeting merchants selling counterfeit and pirated goods - an investigation that resulted in a raid Sunday on the Southwest Baltimore marketplace, according to a search warrant and affidavit released Monday. Capping the intensive investigation into fake brand-name clothes and accessories, as well as pirated DVDs and musical recordings, special agents with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Homeland Security Investigations confiscated numerous items being sold at the sprawling market.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | August 8, 1997
In one of the largest drug cases in Maryland history, a South Florida man who conspired to move more than a ton of cocaine worth $25 million through Baltimore was convicted of drug-conspiracy charges in federal court yesterday.After several hours of deliberations over two days, jurors found Luis Francisco Alba, 49, of Miami guilty of conspiring to distribute cocaine from South America in steel chemical drums to the Dundalk Marine Terminal and then a warehouse in East Baltimore.Alba faces a minimum 10-year prison term and a maximum of life without parole when he is sentenced Oct. 17 by U.S. District Judge Frederic N. Smalkin.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | November 15, 2001
Investigations in the Sept. 11 terrorism and the anthrax attacks that followed have federal agents in Maryland stretched so thin that they say fewer federal crimes are being investigated - at least for now. Officials say many of the 200 FBI agents assigned to Maryland and Delaware have been working full time on terrorism since Sept. 11 and have been drawn off cases they usually investigate, which range from white-collar crime to child pornography. "When Sept. 11 first happened, pretty much everybody was working on terrorism.
NEWS
March 1, 1994
The verdicts in the murder cases against survivors of the Waco disaster are fittingly ambiguous. None of the 11 defendants was convicted of the more serious murder and conspiracy charges, but five were found guilty of something called aiding and abetting voluntary manslaughter. This acknowledges that four federal agents were killed in the first attempt to storm the Branch Davidian stronghold in Texas a year ago. But it leaves unresolved the question who was really at fault.In no way can the violent deaths of lawmen be condoned.
NEWS
By Newsday | September 27, 1991
NEW YORK -- Dandeny Munoz-Mosquera may be one of the world's busiest hired killers, but not too busy for a leisurely afternoon at Disneyland.That was just one of Munoz-Mosquera's many stops during a trip the United States that apparently had spanned 12 days before it was abruptly interrupted Wednesday night by his arrest on a Queens street corner, according to federal officials tracking him for nearly two weeks.Munoz-Mosquera -- who federal agents say may have killed or arranged the murders of more than 40 police officers, judges and politicians for the Medellin drug cartel in his native Colombia -- was in the city to commit murder, according to Drug Enforcement Administration agents and court papers filed in Brooklyn.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | September 20, 1996
Seventy of the 86 suspected illegal immigrants arrested Tuesday in a raid on a Kent County nursery will be voluntarily deported today, according to the Baltimore director of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, who yesterday defended the conduct of his agents during the operation.The 70 Mexican citizens will be flown on a government charter, due to leave Baltimore-Washington International Airport about 1 p.m., to Harlingen, Texas, where they will board a bus and be transported across the border, said Benedict J. Ferro, head of the INS office in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 10, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The siege goes on. The bills roll in.Guns and ammo? No problem, they bring their own. It's the klieg ZTC lights and dog food that start to add up.Not to mention the $109,000 the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms shelled out for "aircraft and supplies."Even the federal bean counters have a role to play in the standoff in Waco, Texas.As the stalemate between the Branch Davidian cult and federal agents dragged past the midpoint of its second week, details emerged yesterday of just how dearly David Koresh is making the U.S. government pay.More than $1 million so far. Possibly millions more.
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