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By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2011
A 32-year-old Baltimore attorney pleaded guilty Tuesday to possessing child pornography, according to the Maryland U.S. Attorney's Office. Patrick Joseph Redd, who was disbarred "by consent" in March, will be sentenced to 24 to 37 months in federal prison if the court accepts his plea deal. Sentencing is scheduled for Sept. 20 in Baltimore U.S. District Court. Federal agents raided Redd's Rodgers Forge home two years ago, seizing a computer that was later found to have 11 images of minors engaged in sexual activity, according to court records, which claim Redd purposely searched for and downloaded the images.
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NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1996
An Arundel High School teacher pleaded innocent yesterday in federal court to 14 counts of illegal trafficking, importation and possession of child pornography on the Internet.Bruce Edward McDade, 47, was indicted May 13 by a federal grand jury on eight counts of distributing and five counts of receiving "a visual depiction of a minor engaging in sexually explicit conduct," according to the U.S. District Court clerk's office in Greenbelt.McDade also was charged Monday with one count of possession of child pornography on the Internet.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2004
Federal authorities and local police seized more than 150 kilograms of cocaine - valued at $4 million wholesale and as much as $40 million on the street - late Wednesday in the Baltimore area and have filed federal drug importation charges against a New York man, officials said yesterday. Law enforcement officials called the narcotics seizure one of the region's largest in recent years. "This is a huge arrest, this is a lot of drugs that are not going to reach the streets of our city," Baltimore Police Commissioner Kevin P. Clark said at a news conference with federal authorities and other local law enforcement officials to announce the seizure.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | August 8, 1997
In one of the largest drug cases in Maryland history, a South Florida man who conspired to move more than a ton of cocaine worth $25 million through Baltimore was convicted of drug-conspiracy charges in federal court yesterday.After several hours of deliberations over two days, jurors found Luis Francisco Alba, 49, of Miami guilty of conspiring to distribute cocaine from South America in steel chemical drums to the Dundalk Marine Terminal and then a warehouse in East Baltimore.Alba faces a minimum 10-year prison term and a maximum of life without parole when he is sentenced Oct. 17 by U.S. District Judge Frederic N. Smalkin.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | November 15, 2001
Investigations in the Sept. 11 terrorism and the anthrax attacks that followed have federal agents in Maryland stretched so thin that they say fewer federal crimes are being investigated - at least for now. Officials say many of the 200 FBI agents assigned to Maryland and Delaware have been working full time on terrorism since Sept. 11 and have been drawn off cases they usually investigate, which range from white-collar crime to child pornography. "When Sept. 11 first happened, pretty much everybody was working on terrorism.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 26, 1999
AUSTIN, Texas -- A figure in the mysterious disappearance of atheist Madalyn Murray O'Hair was ordered held without bond yesterday after being arrested the day before on federal weapons charges.David R. Waters, 52, appeared before U.S. Magistrate Stephen Capelle after federal agents raided his Austin apartment and confiscated more than 100 rounds of ammunition."Federal firearms charges are being filed against Mr. Waters based on ammunition seized at his residence," said Assistant U.S. Attorney Gerald Carruth in Austin.
NEWS
March 1, 1994
The verdicts in the murder cases against survivors of the Waco disaster are fittingly ambiguous. None of the 11 defendants was convicted of the more serious murder and conspiracy charges, but five were found guilty of something called aiding and abetting voluntary manslaughter. This acknowledges that four federal agents were killed in the first attempt to storm the Branch Davidian stronghold in Texas a year ago. But it leaves unresolved the question who was really at fault.In no way can the violent deaths of lawmen be condoned.
NEWS
By Newsday | September 27, 1991
NEW YORK -- Dandeny Munoz-Mosquera may be one of the world's busiest hired killers, but not too busy for a leisurely afternoon at Disneyland.That was just one of Munoz-Mosquera's many stops during a trip the United States that apparently had spanned 12 days before it was abruptly interrupted Wednesday night by his arrest on a Queens street corner, according to federal officials tracking him for nearly two weeks.Munoz-Mosquera -- who federal agents say may have killed or arranged the murders of more than 40 police officers, judges and politicians for the Medellin drug cartel in his native Colombia -- was in the city to commit murder, according to Drug Enforcement Administration agents and court papers filed in Brooklyn.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | September 20, 1996
Seventy of the 86 suspected illegal immigrants arrested Tuesday in a raid on a Kent County nursery will be voluntarily deported today, according to the Baltimore director of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, who yesterday defended the conduct of his agents during the operation.The 70 Mexican citizens will be flown on a government charter, due to leave Baltimore-Washington International Airport about 1 p.m., to Harlingen, Texas, where they will board a bus and be transported across the border, said Benedict J. Ferro, head of the INS office in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 10, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The siege goes on. The bills roll in.Guns and ammo? No problem, they bring their own. It's the klieg ZTC lights and dog food that start to add up.Not to mention the $109,000 the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms shelled out for "aircraft and supplies."Even the federal bean counters have a role to play in the standoff in Waco, Texas.As the stalemate between the Branch Davidian cult and federal agents dragged past the midpoint of its second week, details emerged yesterday of just how dearly David Koresh is making the U.S. government pay.More than $1 million so far. Possibly millions more.
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