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By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | November 15, 2001
Investigations in the Sept. 11 terrorism and the anthrax attacks that followed have federal agents in Maryland stretched so thin that they say fewer federal crimes are being investigated - at least for now. Officials say many of the 200 FBI agents assigned to Maryland and Delaware have been working full time on terrorism since Sept. 11 and have been drawn off cases they usually investigate, which range from white-collar crime to child pornography. "When Sept. 11 first happened, pretty much everybody was working on terrorism.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | December 28, 2013
The 1970s corruption investigation known as Abscam, celebrated in "American Hustle," one of the holiday season's hottest movies, had its roots in Baltimore. It was in Charm City that the FBI tested the sting-style operation that marked Abscam as a particularly theatrical and effective form of undercover investigation. Baltimore FBI agents later trained those who carried out the Abscam sting. Abscam famously featured FBI agents posing as Arab sheiks, along with an accomplished con artist (played by Christian Bale in "American Hustle")
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | September 20, 1996
Seventy of the 86 suspected illegal immigrants arrested Tuesday in a raid on a Kent County nursery will be voluntarily deported today, according to the Baltimore director of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, who yesterday defended the conduct of his agents during the operation.The 70 Mexican citizens will be flown on a government charter, due to leave Baltimore-Washington International Airport about 1 p.m., to Harlingen, Texas, where they will board a bus and be transported across the border, said Benedict J. Ferro, head of the INS office in Baltimore.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 26, 1999
AUSTIN, Texas -- A figure in the mysterious disappearance of atheist Madalyn Murray O'Hair was ordered held without bond yesterday after being arrested the day before on federal weapons charges.David R. Waters, 52, appeared before U.S. Magistrate Stephen Capelle after federal agents raided his Austin apartment and confiscated more than 100 rounds of ammunition."Federal firearms charges are being filed against Mr. Waters based on ammunition seized at his residence," said Assistant U.S. Attorney Gerald Carruth in Austin.
NEWS
March 1, 1994
The verdicts in the murder cases against survivors of the Waco disaster are fittingly ambiguous. None of the 11 defendants was convicted of the more serious murder and conspiracy charges, but five were found guilty of something called aiding and abetting voluntary manslaughter. This acknowledges that four federal agents were killed in the first attempt to storm the Branch Davidian stronghold in Texas a year ago. But it leaves unresolved the question who was really at fault.In no way can the violent deaths of lawmen be condoned.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 24, 1995
HYDER, Ariz. -- William Marks was a prime suspect when he was hooked up to a polygraph machine and interrogated by federal agents in connection with the deadly derailment of an Amtrak train near this desert community.During hours of questioning by agents who "stared into my eyes the whole time," Mr. Marks was told that someone had implicated him in the sabotage of a trestle that sent the Sunset Limited crashing into a ravine Oct. 9, killing one person and injuring 78.He also was asked about his gun collection, night-vision rifle scope and whether he knew anyone who hated the federal government.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 10, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The siege goes on. The bills roll in.Guns and ammo? No problem, they bring their own. It's the klieg ZTC lights and dog food that start to add up.Not to mention the $109,000 the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms shelled out for "aircraft and supplies."Even the federal bean counters have a role to play in the standoff in Waco, Texas.As the stalemate between the Branch Davidian cult and federal agents dragged past the midpoint of its second week, details emerged yesterday of just how dearly David Koresh is making the U.S. government pay.More than $1 million so far. Possibly millions more.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 10, 1994
HOUSTON -- Ten and a half months after the apocalyptic ministry of David Koresh became known around the world with a deadly gun battle between his followers and federal agents, 11 surviving members of his sect are to go on trial today to face murder charges.Although even prosecutors have suggested that there is much confusion about who actually fired the fatal shots -- and though three defendants were not present during the gun battle -- the 10 men and a woman are all accused of being part of a broad conspiracy to kill federal agents during a raid Feb. 28 by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | March 25, 2010
Federal prosecutors filed criminal charges this week against Baltimore police Detective Mark J. Lunsford, alleging he embezzled $10,000 in confidential-informant funds while assigned to a federal drug task force, lied to colleagues and stole a broken diamond watch from a target's home during a drug raid. "The charges are not unexpected, and Mr. Lunsford is extremely regretful that he finds himself in this position," defense attorney Paul M. Polansky said Wednesday. No court date has been set on the charges, which were filed Tuesday through a "criminal information" by prosecutors rather than a grand jury indictment.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | June 29, 1995
Developer Randolph R. Ayersman has built some of rural Howard County's most beautiful gabled homes, selling for as much as $725,000.But federal agents announced yesterday that they have taken away his dream-home business, saying he financed it through the sale of more than 3 tons of marijuana smuggled in from Mexico.Ayersman, 42, has pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, and the Drug Enforcement Administration has seized properties including his $400,000 Dayton home, his nearby farm valued at $450,000 and seven choice land parcels valued at more than $800,000.
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